Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Note: You can take 10% off all Slashdot Deals with coupon code "slashdot10off." ×

Comment Re:Ping Pong (Score 1) 432

...hell if you believe that Democracy is an absolute right then you can just says that since PRC government was not democratically elected then all the laws it enacted are illegitimate.

Why limit this to PRC? If one believes that Democracy is an absolute right, then none of the current major governments are legit. You might find a Democracy in smaller governing bodies, organizations, etc.

Comment Re:Problem is lack of thoughtfulness (Score 1) 649

It appears that Huffington Post changed the text of the article (and added photos, etc). Currently if I do the same search, Huffing Post doesn't even come up; much less the text that it contained. Doing the same search does yield other results though. Next time I link to something I'll include the text. Lesson learned.

Of course she would ask for illegally copied music. It just ... sounds better. Doesn't it? ;)

Comment Re:Problem is lack of thoughtfulness (Score 1) 649

Consumer electronics and media gifts like iPods and DVD's are what you give when your out of ideas. They do not show a good level of understanding of the person you are giving the gift to

I agree that electronic/media items are common when you're out of ideas. It especially shows in this case since it wasn't an original idea from the Obama family. It's what the Queen herself asked for!

You can find other sources by searching for "queen elizabeth wanted ipod"

So the gift was not thoughtless at all.

Privacy

Submission + - New teeny tiny RFID chips

paltemalte writes: "Hitachi has just come out with a new crop of RFID tags, measuring only 0.05 x 0.05 millimeters. Compare that with the previously smallest chips at 0.4 x 0.4 millimeters. The new chips width is slightly smaller than the width of a human hair. These new chips could put an end to shoplifting forever, but they could also be used by a government or other entity to 'dust' crowds or areas, easily tagging anyone present without their knowledge or consent. Think easy tracking of dissenters or demonstrators. Will someone come up with a surefire way of neutralizing chips that may be on your body or in your clothing?"
The Internet

Submission + - Canadian ISPs Send Thousands of Copyright Notices

An anonymous reader writes: The CBC reports that Canadian Internet service providers are passing along thousands of copyright infringement notifications from U.S. copyright lobby groups such as the Business Sofware Alliance to subscribers under a system called notice and notice. Michael Geist comments that unlike the U.S. takedown approach, the Canadian system is proving effective while protecting privacy and free speech.
United States

Submission + - U.S. senator: Time to ban Wikipedia in schools

jcatcw writes: Preston Gralla is appalled by Senator Ted Stevens' latest: Senate Bill 49, aka Son of Dopa. The bill would require schools and libraries that receive federal Internet subsidies to block access to a variety of sites. Stevens, a dangerous buffoon according to Gralla, would effectively ban reference materials from libraries.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's Love Letter to IBM

Andy Updegrove writes: "Microsoft decided to escalate the OOXML/ODF air wars yesterday by sending IBM a "valentine," posted as an open letter at the Microsoft Interoperability Web page. In that letter, Microsoft recalls its passive role during the adoption by ISO/IEC of ODF forcefully accuses IBM of waging a global, hypocritical campaign to thwart the approval of OOXML in JTC 1. The action is hardly surprising, and from a strategic point of view even overdue. Till now, Microsoft has taken the position that many of the comments offered in JTC1 during the contradictions phase will prove to be neutral, or even positive, but soon they will become public. If they turn out to be strongly negative, Microsoft will need to revert to a Plan B, such as a plot by IBM "to limit customer choice," which is exactly what Microsoft appears to have decided to do."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft, IBM in slap-fight over open documents

coondoggie writes: "Microsoft went on the offensive Wednesday with a Valentine's Day attack on IBM openly accusing its rival of trying to subvert Microsoft's efforts to standardize its new document format and in turn destabilize customer choices. "A lot of hype — and smoke and mirrors obfuscation — surrounds interoperability these days," Microsoft wrote in an open letter published on its Web site. Meanwhile, Bob Sutor, IBM's vice president of open source and open standards, wrote on his blog: "The OpenDocument Format ISO standard is vastly superior to the Open XML spec." Sutor also said in his post: "ODF is what the world needs today to drive competition, innovation and lower costs for customers. It is an example of a real open standard versus a vendor-dictated spec that documents proprietary products via XML. ODF is about the future, Open XML is about the past. We voted for the future." http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/021407-micro soft-ibm-formats.html"
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - Gamespy shocks and offends

Sol Almande writes: "Well well well, would you believe it? Gamespy.com's own random name generator, Naminator [gamespy], has managed to shock and offend in a breathlessly brazen manner. In as little as two words Gamespy has conjured up both a defamation of a major religious figurehead as well as a reference to a sexual act still banned in some American states. In a move that surely breaks its own Ts and Cs, Gamespy suggests that I might like to change my in-game nickname to "BuggeringBuddah" Screengrab [imageshack] Exactly how successful this name will be at subverting/angering/amusing the online masses is as yet unknown; I'm still recovering slowly over a nice cup of green tea while realigning my bent-out chi."
Security

Submission + - Critical flaw in current Firefox discovered

HuckleCom writes: F-Secure has a blog post regarding the latest version of Firefox and a vulnerability that allows malicious javascript code to manipulate any of your cookies.

From the Blog: "There's a new bug reported in the way Firefox handles writes to the 'location.hostname' DOM property. The vulnerability could potentially allow a malicious website to manipulate the authentication cookies for a third-party site."

From what I can recollect, this seems to be the first vulnerability discovered in the actual current version of Firefox — at least for a good long time.

The test of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts. -- Aldo Leopold

Working...