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Submission + - Cloud Providers Accelerate Hiring (datacenterknowledge.com)

1sockchuck writes: While much of the U.S. economy experiences a “jobless recovery,” the cloud computing sector is hiring like mad. Amazon Web Services has more than 400 job listings for cloud technologists, while Rackspace is holding a job fair to find 100 new hires. The search for cloud skills is among the factors prompting an increase in poaching IT workers from rival companies.

Submission + - Why Windows Server Deserves Your Respect (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Grizzled Unix vet Paul Venezia tips his cap to the Windows Server crew, suggesting that the lessons of Unix history have not been lost on Microsoft — and that's one reason why Windows Server has become so complex. 'The Windows Server of today has more in common with Unix than many people want to admit. The upside: more stable servers, greater scope of services, better adherence to standards, and Microsoft's newfound willingness to work with its competition. The downside is that Windows has become more complex than Unix from a management and administration point of view,' Venezia writes, even if he still sees some Windows admin practices as prime examples of how not to administer servers."

Submission + - Mathworks exchanges copyleft for BSD (aravind.name)

Digana writes: This happened rather quietly July last year, but the Mathworks, creators of the popular mathematical software Matlab, rejected any non-BSD free code publicly hosted in their servers. Most noticeably, much GPL code was affected by this decision, although the Mathwork's word choice avoids specifying if this is about fighting copyleft or not.

Code licensed under the GPL had to be removed from the servers if it couldn't be relicensed.

Submission + - Open Source Licenses or Community – What Mat (linuxplanet.com)

darthcamaro writes: When it comes to Free and Open Source Software, the license is mother and it is father right? It's the license that defines software or code as being open or free. But even thought he license is the beginning of the discussion when it comes open source, it's not the final word anymore either. Even the people that define what is and isn't an open source — the Open Source Initiative (OSI) now see that licensing is just one part of the total equation.

"I have come to place a much greater importance for alternative aspects of open source than just strict licensing," Michael Tiemann President of the Open Source Initiative told InternetNews.com. "I have come to believe that a license alone is neither a secret to success nor an absolution of sin."


Submission + - Sony announces first 3D Blu-ray Disc players (goodgearguide.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "Sony has announced a new 3D Blu-ray Disc player and upgrades to existing players so that they will be able to show high-definition 3D movies too. The company introduced the BDP-S470 Blu-ray Disc model and upgraded existing home theater systems, which will be able to play Blu-ray movies when related firmware for the devices is released later this year. Movies based on the Blu-ray 3D specification, which was finalized by the Blu-ray Association in December, can be shown on the players."

Submission + - Google May Be Sued By Quintura Over Wonder Wheel (searchengineland.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The visual search engine Quintura may be filing a lawsuit against Google over Google’s Wonder Wheel “visual search engine interface.” Quintura holds 8 patents on the technology and Google may be infringing the company’s patents.

Submission + - SPAM: Quick: Time to Stop the SWIFT Agreement

ChiefMonkeyGrinder writes: A controversial agreement that allows the United States to monitor EU citizens' banking data for anti-terror investigations should be rejected. The deal would essentially give the US government access to all financial transactions flowing through SWIFT, including much sensitive commercial information about you and your company. It would take a totally honest, upright, incorruptible secret service with steely will-power to resist the urge to pass on incidental competitive information that it extracted from the SWIFT streams to its mates in US companies, and given the CIA's past record, I don't somehow think it quite measures up to that particular standard. If you're looking for inspiration as to what you might say to your MEP, the European Commission is running a (separate) consultation about data transfers between the EU and US, and this has a number of good questions to which you might like to offer your opinions. The deadline for this is 12 March, so you've plenty of time. Writing to your MEP, though is rather more urgent, and needs to be done, er, swiftly, please....
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Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang