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+ - BBC's iPlayer on GrokLaw->

Submitted by qaz2
qaz2 (36148) writes "There is an interview with Mark Taylor (the president of UK OpenSource consortium) on groklaw in which, amongst other subjects, the BBC's iPlayer is discussed.What amazed me is the following part (cited from that story):

Q: Saying that it's a Verisign Kontiki architecture, it's peer-to-peer, and in fact one of the more worrying aspects is that you have no control over your node. It loads at boot time under Windows, the BBC can use as much of your bandwidth as they please (laughter), in fact I think OFCOM, you know, made some kind of estimate as to how many hundreds of millions of pounds that would cost everyone [Ed: see this video interview with Verisign Kontiki executive, and this one], there is a hidden directory called "My Deliveries" which pre-caches large preview files, it phones home to the Microsoft DRM servers of course, it logs all the iPlayer activity and errors with identifiers in an unencrypted file. Now, does this assessment agree with what you've looked at?
Mark Taylor: Yes.

What I'm wondering is, when this player gets released, would the user be warned of all the trafic which will be generated, and the privacy concerns associated with using this player?"

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The Unforking of KDE's KHTML and Webkit Begins 104

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the sounds-dirty dept.
Jiilik Oiolosse writes to tell us Ars Technica is reporting that after years of existing seperately, KHTML and Webkit are finally coming back together. "In open source terms, this may be as big of a deal as the gcc and egcs merger of yonder days. KHTML and Webkit are definitely coming of age. The KDE developers, responsible for the original creation of KHTML, are dedicated to seeing this unforking happen and are taking a leading role in that effort."

Zombies invade Apple store->

From feed by engfeed

Filed under: Misc. Gadgets

So apparently last night the California street Apple store in SF was mobbed by... wait for it... flesh-eating hordes. We suppose the obvious joke would be that brain-eating zombies would go hungry paying a visit to an Apple store, but we know better than to arouse the ire of Mac fanboys -- and zombies -- so we're leaving this one alone.
[Photo by Declan McCullagh]

Read - CNET story
Read - SF Zombie mob manifesto

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Office Depot Featured Gadget: Xbox 360 Platinum System Packs the power to bring games to life!


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Operating Systems

+ - Alternative Enterprise Desktop Solutions?

Submitted by sinco
sinco (114691) writes "Since Microsoft Vista's pricing and hardware requirements increased, I am currently in the process of evaluating alternative solutions for our enterprise desktop computing environment. I have been evaluating Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 as well looking into the other potential cost saving solutions such as using thin-clients. Our organization has about 3,000 computers. Out of that we'd like to target employees that use the basic applications (word processing, email, web browsing) and if successful move forward from there. I was wondering what was your recent experience of migrating from Windows to Linux on the desktop with your enterprise in relation to cost and ease? Also, what is your opinion or experience of using thin-clients as an alternative to the traditional fat client for the enterprise desktop?"
GUI

+ - Top 5 OS X Style Dock Replacements for Linux

Submitted by
Dan the man
Dan the man writes "Why lie about it? Linux right out of the box is lacking style. Even with the new Ubuntu and RedHat packages, people look at Linux as a Legacy Operating system because it 's style looks like something that Al gore would have used 20 years ago. Here you will find my reviews and videos of the top 5 OS X Style Dock Replacements for Linux. Check out the top 5 list here: http://pimpyourlinux.com/linux-feature-review/top- 5-os-x-style-dock-replacements-for-linux/"
Mozilla

+ - Why does Firefox crash so often?

Submitted by
s3x3s
s3x3s writes "I switched over to the Firefox camp a long time ago, and as long as I can remember there has always been a processor/memory leak. Does anyone know why Mozilla has yet to address this after several releases? Or is this just the price one has to pay for using open source?"
Software

+ - Recommendations for a Virtual SQA Testing Lab?

Submitted by
Dr. Zarkov
Dr. Zarkov writes "I'm trying to set up a facility to enable testing software on various software/hardware platforms (all Windows, currently, but conceivably that could change "in the future"), without all the drawbacks of maintaining the actual physical platforms. Ideally, I'd like 2 or more testers to be able to call up a given virtual machine remotely, and test concurrently, with or without interaction between the testbed instances. VMware's Lab Manager product looks like it could fit the bill, although it may be over budget. Does anyone have any experience with that product? What about alternatives, especially using FOSS? Also, has anyone found any good comparison studies for any of the numerous virtualization products available? (I already checked out the recent slashdot article comparing Xen and OpenVZ)."
User Journal

Journal: Drinking license 9

Journal by benhocking
A coworker and I were talking about the problem of people learning to drive before they learn to drink. This is a major problem, in our opinion, because Americans "learn" to drink after becoming drivers. This friend had an interesting idea for solving this problem - drinking licenses, handed out at, say, 16. (Driving licenses could then be handed out at 17 or 18. The actual ages involved are not really part of this idea.) Maybe there'd even be a learner's permit for drinking. Anyways, there woul
Java

+ - James Gosling on Open Sourcing Java

Submitted by
eldavojohn
eldavojohn writes "James Gosling, the father of Java, gave an interesting interview at JavaOne in which he spoke about a lot of things including JavaFX & the recent events of Java becoming Open Source. What he had to say about the problems they were facing with the open source community(s): "One of the issues we've had with open-sourcing is that often people try to generalize the open-source community as this one big kumbaya happy family, but in fact it's a bunch of warring states. They all have their Great Wall of China and they lob stones back and forth.""
Security

+ - Credit Card security: Who pays for breaches?

Submitted by
PetManimal
PetManimal writes "A scheme to steal customers' credit and debit card information at a New England supermarket chain highlights a little-understood fact about credit card security: Customers still think that the credit-card companies have to eat fraudulent charges, but since PCI DSS standards were adopted, it's actually the merchant banks and merchants who have to pay up. And, according to the author of the last article, it's a good thing:

The main reason PCI exists is that there are tens of thousands of merchants who don't understand the basics of information security and weren't even taking the very minimum steps to secure their networks and the credit card information they stored. ... PCI pushes that burden downstream and forces merchants to take on a preventative role rather than a reactive role. They have to put in a properly configured firewall, encrypt sensitive information and maintain a minimum security stance or be fined by their merchant banks. By forcing this to be an issue about prevention rather than reaction, the credit card companies have taken the bulk of the financial burden off of themselves and placed it on the merchants, which is where much of it belongs anyways.
"

If this is timesharing, give me my share right now.

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