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Privacy

+ - BBC's iPlayer on GrokLaw->

Submitted by qaz2
qaz2 (36148) writes "There is an interview with Mark Taylor (the president of UK OpenSource consortium) on groklaw in which, amongst other subjects, the BBC's iPlayer is discussed.What amazed me is the following part (cited from that story):

Q: Saying that it's a Verisign Kontiki architecture, it's peer-to-peer, and in fact one of the more worrying aspects is that you have no control over your node. It loads at boot time under Windows, the BBC can use as much of your bandwidth as they please (laughter), in fact I think OFCOM, you know, made some kind of estimate as to how many hundreds of millions of pounds that would cost everyone [Ed: see this video interview with Verisign Kontiki executive, and this one], there is a hidden directory called "My Deliveries" which pre-caches large preview files, it phones home to the Microsoft DRM servers of course, it logs all the iPlayer activity and errors with identifiers in an unencrypted file. Now, does this assessment agree with what you've looked at?
Mark Taylor: Yes.

What I'm wondering is, when this player gets released, would the user be warned of all the trafic which will be generated, and the privacy concerns associated with using this player?"

Link to Original Source

The Unforking of KDE's KHTML and Webkit Begins 104

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the sounds-dirty dept.
Jiilik Oiolosse writes to tell us Ars Technica is reporting that after years of existing seperately, KHTML and Webkit are finally coming back together. "In open source terms, this may be as big of a deal as the gcc and egcs merger of yonder days. KHTML and Webkit are definitely coming of age. The KDE developers, responsible for the original creation of KHTML, are dedicated to seeing this unforking happen and are taking a leading role in that effort."
Operating Systems

+ - Alternative Enterprise Desktop Solutions?

Submitted by sinco
sinco (114691) writes "Since Microsoft Vista's pricing and hardware requirements increased, I am currently in the process of evaluating alternative solutions for our enterprise desktop computing environment. I have been evaluating Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 as well looking into the other potential cost saving solutions such as using thin-clients. Our organization has about 3,000 computers. Out of that we'd like to target employees that use the basic applications (word processing, email, web browsing) and if successful move forward from there. I was wondering what was your recent experience of migrating from Windows to Linux on the desktop with your enterprise in relation to cost and ease? Also, what is your opinion or experience of using thin-clients as an alternative to the traditional fat client for the enterprise desktop?"
GUI

+ - Top 5 OS X Style Dock Replacements for Linux

Submitted by
Dan the man
Dan the man writes "Why lie about it? Linux right out of the box is lacking style. Even with the new Ubuntu and RedHat packages, people look at Linux as a Legacy Operating system because it 's style looks like something that Al gore would have used 20 years ago. Here you will find my reviews and videos of the top 5 OS X Style Dock Replacements for Linux. Check out the top 5 list here: http://pimpyourlinux.com/linux-feature-review/top- 5-os-x-style-dock-replacements-for-linux/"
Mozilla

+ - Why does Firefox crash so often?

Submitted by
s3x3s
s3x3s writes "I switched over to the Firefox camp a long time ago, and as long as I can remember there has always been a processor/memory leak. Does anyone know why Mozilla has yet to address this after several releases? Or is this just the price one has to pay for using open source?"
Software

+ - Recommendations for a Virtual SQA Testing Lab?

Submitted by
Dr. Zarkov
Dr. Zarkov writes "I'm trying to set up a facility to enable testing software on various software/hardware platforms (all Windows, currently, but conceivably that could change "in the future"), without all the drawbacks of maintaining the actual physical platforms. Ideally, I'd like 2 or more testers to be able to call up a given virtual machine remotely, and test concurrently, with or without interaction between the testbed instances. VMware's Lab Manager product looks like it could fit the bill, although it may be over budget. Does anyone have any experience with that product? What about alternatives, especially using FOSS? Also, has anyone found any good comparison studies for any of the numerous virtualization products available? (I already checked out the recent slashdot article comparing Xen and OpenVZ)."
Java

+ - James Gosling on Open Sourcing Java

Submitted by
eldavojohn
eldavojohn writes "James Gosling, the father of Java, gave an interesting interview at JavaOne in which he spoke about a lot of things including JavaFX & the recent events of Java becoming Open Source. What he had to say about the problems they were facing with the open source community(s): "One of the issues we've had with open-sourcing is that often people try to generalize the open-source community as this one big kumbaya happy family, but in fact it's a bunch of warring states. They all have their Great Wall of China and they lob stones back and forth.""
Security

+ - Credit Card security: Who pays for breaches?

Submitted by
PetManimal
PetManimal writes "A scheme to steal customers' credit and debit card information at a New England supermarket chain highlights a little-understood fact about credit card security: Customers still think that the credit-card companies have to eat fraudulent charges, but since PCI DSS standards were adopted, it's actually the merchant banks and merchants who have to pay up. And, according to the author of the last article, it's a good thing:

The main reason PCI exists is that there are tens of thousands of merchants who don't understand the basics of information security and weren't even taking the very minimum steps to secure their networks and the credit card information they stored. ... PCI pushes that burden downstream and forces merchants to take on a preventative role rather than a reactive role. They have to put in a properly configured firewall, encrypt sensitive information and maintain a minimum security stance or be fined by their merchant banks. By forcing this to be an issue about prevention rather than reaction, the credit card companies have taken the bulk of the financial burden off of themselves and placed it on the merchants, which is where much of it belongs anyways.
"
Slashdot.org

+ - Ajax and E-Commerce Solutions

Submitted by
ecart
ecart writes "Ever wonder what large e-commerce retailers use for a shopping cart solution? Do they build their e-commerce solution in-house or outsource? Do their CIO's go through the same process of researching and selecting a cart solution that us little guys go through? You betcha.

They fish in a much larger pond than micro/small e-commerce operations and the solutions available to them blow many of the hosted shopping cart solutions that we know and love right out of the water. Take for instance Demandware.

Demandware has an impressive client list that includes Playboy and Vermont Teddy Bear. Even more impressive is their solution. Features include an AJAX shopping cart, highly evolved merchandising ability and a robust checkout system that can include incentives and offers for upselling. Oh and did I mention they offer AN AJAX SHOPPING CART?!!?

Sorry of getting so excited over this technology but it makes the shopping experience SO MUCH better than other web technologies. With AJAX you can kiss the following goodbye:

  — Requiring customer to click to go through a checkout.
  — No more disjointed steps to "Add to Cart" or "Continue Shopping".
  — No more clicking to get shipping costs.

All of these benefits sum up to higher sales conversion rates for the store. Quite simply, the easier you make to buy something from your online store — the more people will buy. Think out it as a one-step checkout on steroids. I'll take it further and say the AJAX shopping carts make one-step shopping cart looks so 1990's. The big boys know this and are going through great pains to update their e-commerce solutions to make uee of AJAX. The Gap even temporarily closed their online stores down to upgrade AJAX. Yes, it's that important.

Now us little guys will just have to wait for an affordable AJAX hosted shopping cart to come along..."
Microsoft

+ - Longhorn server is virtually ready

Submitted by Rob
Rob (703254) writes "The next release of Microsoft's server operating system depends on the company deciding its virtualization capabilities are ready to go, according to the company's UK server director. In April 2005, Microsoft's CEO, Steve Ballmer, announced that the company would introduce a virtualization hypervisor in the next version of Windows Server, which is codenamed Longhorn. The hypervisor technology will be embedded within Windows and enable it to take direct advantage of processor-level virtualization technologies to improve the performance and efficiency of running virtual machines. The approach being taken by Microsoft is similar to that taken by its open source rival and partner XenSource Inc in that it creates virtual environments at the operating system layer rather than the hardware virtualization model taken by incumbent VMware Inc, a division of EMC Corp."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Journal: Vista Upgrade

Journal by Cybertroll

I am not sure how things go for those poor beings who decided to do an upgrade from XP to Vista... somehow I have this weird feeling it will be as bad as the 98 to XP change. The horror of the Vista Upgrade must be even worse for a simple user such as this guy in his webcomic :)

Software

+ - The Top 100 Alternative Vendors

Submitted by
Anonymous
Anonymous writes "Everyone can name the market leaders in different technology segments. HP has overtaken Dell in PCs and is the undisputed market-share leader in printers. Microsoft holds the title for operating systems. Symantec stands at the top of the hill for antivirus software. Cisco is king in data and voice networking. And EMC ranks ahead of all others in storage hardware. Alternative vendors? They're everyone else, with innovative technologies that complement hardware and software offered by market-share leaders. And, according to VARBusiness.com, they often offer higher margins and better sales opportunities. Here are 100 you should know across 10 key technology segments."

"You tweachewous miscweant!" -- Elmer Fudd

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