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Comment: Re:*shrug* (Score 1) 379

by Alioth (#49757337) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

So did the Acorn Archimedes (the computer the ARM CPU was originally made for). RiscOS even had things like anti-aliased fonts by then, and certain user interface concepts that didn't show up elsewhere until Mac OSX came out.

However, the PC and Microsoft was already massively entrenched, and the news was huge - finally the computers most people actually used at work were going to catch up with the Mac, Amiga, Archimedes and other machines.

Comment: Re: *shrug* (Score 1) 379

by Alioth (#49757327) Attached to: 25 Years Today - Windows 3.0

But anyone could tell that Windows was going to be huge. The PC was already dominant and Microsoft was already nearing monopoly position in the PC market (and IBM compatibles at the time had fallen in price such that they were price competitive with the Amiga) and the upgrade path for most people was not to buy a whole new computer but just add Windows.

I remember the news at the time. It was huge. Finally, the PC that nearly everyone was using was catching up to the Mac, Archimedes, Amiga etc.

Comment: So what (Score 4, Interesting) 81

by FreeUser (#49745787) Attached to: Take Two Sues BBC Over Drama About GTA Development

What if it's a smear job on Take Two? At taxpayer expense?

1. This isn't at taxpayer expense. It is at television owners' expense. Only people with televisions have to pay the television license that funds the BBC, not all taxpayers. To conflate the two is disingenuous.

2. So what if it is inaccurate or a smear job. That is part of having a free press: the right to get it wrong (and if you do, be eviscerated and/or humiliated by everyone else). The BBC has a very good record and deservedly good reputation, because despite the occasional imperfection, by and large their reporting and documentaries are first rate.

This lawsuit is an attempt to undermine the free press and apply inappropriate pressure to the editorial process, and frankly, Rockstar and Take Two deserve a severe smackdown for trying to do so, irrespective of the program's content.

Comment: In a nutshell (Score 4, Insightful) 81

by FreeUser (#49744457) Attached to: Take Two Sues BBC Over Drama About GTA Development

In a nutshell, what they're saying is:

"If we can't control your editorial content in reporting about or dramatizing our behavior, we're going to sue you in an attempt to make it not worth your while to report on or dramatize our behavior"

Fuck them. I hope the BBC has the backbone to stick up to this sort of corporate bullying. If the show isn't flattering to Take Two, they can suck it up like anyone else.

Comment: Re:Maybe I'm Old (Score 1) 47

I agree. It may only take a few seconds to google, but that's a few seconds unnecessarily wasted because the summary poster was too lazy to provide a definition (though to be fair, with as inaccurate as some summaries have been lately, this isn't the worst offense by far).

MOOC
moÍzok/
noun
a course of study made available over the Internet without charge to a very large number of people.
"anyone who decides to take a MOOC simply logs on to the website and signs up"

Comment: Re:Numbers (Score 1) 825

by FreeUser (#49737535) Attached to: Oregon Testing Pay-Per-Mile Driving Fee To Replace Gas Tax

And in exchange for higher taxes on driving, they get the privilege of providing Oregon information on how much they travel and WHERE THEY TRAVEL.

It doesn't have to be that way. There could simply be an annual check of your odometer when you get your annual emissions check, with a bill due for the miles driven in the last year * rate per mile, payable in 60 days, with a slightly higher rate if you'd like to pay in installments. No need for GPS tracking at all.

Of course, they'll no doubt push in the direction of GPS tracking because big brother likes his data, but really, we could have per mile taxation without big brother intrusions if we as a society would stand up and demand it.

Comment: Re:Curious... (Score 1) 1082

by Alioth (#49734451) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

Raising minimum wage *past a certain point* won't help anyone. If you've ever done basic calculus you will have come across the concept of oprimization - in the abstract for instance, finding where the derivative of a function that's some sort of concave-down curve crosses zero.

The minimum wage will be like that. If you graphed the spending power of the minimum wage people (their income minus their expenses) it will probably be some kind of curve. Starting from zero, the graph will slope upwards, until you hit a peak, and then it will slope downwards as the increased labour cost exceeds the benefit of higher wages.

We are probably somewhere to the left of this optimal point. The increase LA is making probably will move people closer to the optimal point. Increasing the minimum wage to $100/hr will move you to a point far to the right of the point at which the first derivative of the graph crosses zero.

Comment: Re:Consumer Price Index (Score 1) 1082

by Alioth (#49734249) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

That assumes 100% of the cost of a product is labour costs.

In reality this is not true. In your example, the wage might go from $60/day to $120/day, but the product will go from $60 before to $80 after. Competition will mean many businesses take lower profits rather than pass on the entire price increase, and virtually no products are 100% labour cost. While wages cannot be raised infinitely, there will be an optimal point, and I suspect we are well below that optimal point as other cities have already demonstrated.

Comment: Re:Stupid reasoning. (Score 1) 1082

by Alioth (#49734233) Attached to: Los Angeles Raises Minimum Wage To $15 an Hour

Only if 100% of that product's cost is labour.

In reality this is rarely true, and competition means that businesses often can't pass on all of the cost increase - what it'll mean is businesses will make a little less profit, prices will increase by less than the increase in the minimum wage, and more people will have some sort of disposable income they can now spend on discretionary items. So sales increase.

Certainly you can't raise wages infinitely, and at some point you'll hit a peak, but I suspect we are a long way below that peak.

Comment: Overdramatic (Score 5, Interesting) 42

by AlecC (#49696859) Attached to: Galaxies Die By Slow "Strangulation"

"Strangulation" seems to me an over-dramatic way of putting it. "Starvation" would be better. The supply of fresh hydrogen stops, so new stars stop being created. The old stars continue burning, some go supernova and blast out metals.Like when you stop adding wood to a fire, the logs already on the fire continue burning and the amount of ash increases.

All this suggests that there is not an indefinite supply of intergalactic hydrogen, so once the galaxy has pulled in all the hydrogen in its immediate vicinity, it will slowly starve.

Comment: Re:Compares well (Score 2) 408

No-fault is about taking money away from lawyers, who used to litigate each and every auto accident as a lawsuit in court before the insurers would pay. Eventually the insurers decided that they spent more on lawyers than accident payments, and they had no reason to do so.

If you want to go back to the way things were, you are welcome to spend lots of time and money in court for trivial things, and see how you like it. I will provide you with expert witness testimony for $7.50/minute plus expenses. The lawyers charge more.

In general your insurer can figure out for themselves if you were at fault or not, and AAA insurance usually tells me when they think I was, or wasn't, when they set rates.

Remember, UNIX spelled backwards is XINU. -- Mt.

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