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Displays

4K Monitors: Not Now, But Soon 186

Posted by Soulskill
from the wait-for-16K dept.
An anonymous reader writes 4K monitor prices have fallen into the range where mainstream consumers are starting to consider them for work and for play. There are enough models that we can compare and contrast, and figure out which are the best of the ones available. But this report at The Wirecutter makes the case that absent a pressing need for 8.29 million pixels, you should just wait before buying one. They say, "The current version of the HDMI specification (1.4a) can only output a 4096×2160 resolution at a refresh rate of 24 Hz or 3840×2160 at 30 Hz—the latter, half that of what we're used to on TVs and monitors. Connect up a 4K monitor at 30 Hz via HDMI and you'll see choppier animations and transitions in your OS. You might also encounter some visible motion stuttering during normal use, and you'll be locked to a maximum of 30 frames per second for your games—it's playable, but not that smooth. ... Most people don't own a system that's good enough for gaming on a 4K display—at least, not at highest-quality settings. You'll be better off if you just plan to surf the Web in 4K: Nvidia cards starting in the 600 series and AMD Radeon HD 6000 and 7000-series GPUs can handle 4K, as can systems built with integrated Intel HD 4000 graphics or AMD Trinity APUs. ... There's a light on the horizon. OS support will strengthen, connection types will be able to handle 4K displays sans digital tricks, and prices will drop as more 4K displays hit the market. By then, there will even be more digital content to play on a 4K display (if gaming or multitasking isn't your thing), and 4K monitors will even start to pull in fancier display technology like Nvidia's G-Sync for even smoother digital shootouts."

Comment: Needs more Spy Thrilling (Score 3, Insightful) 89

by psyclone (#47257543) Attached to: Nokia Extorted For Millions Over Stolen Encryption Keys

The money was left in a bag at a parking lot nearby Särkänniemi amusement park. Then things went wrong. The blackmailer took the bag. Police, however, lost track of the blackmailer and the money was gone.

What, no GPS transmitter in the filament of each paper Euro? Amateurs.

Comment: Re:Meta-review (Score 1) 51

by psyclone (#47248297) Attached to: Book Review: Security Without Obscurity
I also thought the review was overly wordy and hard to parse. For example:

One of the ways Stapleton brings his broad experience to the book is in the many areas where he compares different types of cryptosystems, technologies and algorithms. This enables the reader to understand what the appropriate type of authentication is most beneficial for the specific requirement.

Could easily be written as:

Stapleton compares different types of cryptosystems, technologies and algorithms.

Leaving plenty of space to list more concrete information from the book, like the Parent suggested: a table of contents.

Comment: Re:A Lost Era (Score 4, Interesting) 122

Even if there are arcade "museums" and other classic arcade venues to be found, do any of those have NEW games? There's a new 4-player pac man game (amidst many ticket-churning games) at a local arcade, which is fun, but it's an iteration on an old game.

My Billy Mitchell question: Is there anything new out there in arcade games that play in a more or less classic style, but don't churn out tickets?
The Almighty Buck

High Frequency Trading and Finance's Race To Irrelevance 382

Posted by timothy
from the gaming-the-game dept.
hype7 (239530) writes 'The Harvard Business Review is running a fascinating article on how finance is increasingly abstracting itself — and the gains it makes — away from the creation of value in the real world, and how High Frequency Trading is the most extreme version of this phenomenon yet. From the article: "High frequency trading is a different phenomenon from the increasing focus on short term returns by human investors. But they're borne from a similar mindset: one in which financial returns are the priority, independent of whether they're associated with something innovative or useful in the real world. What Lewis's book demonstrated to me isn't just how "bad" HFTs are per se, but rather, what happens when finance keeps walking down the path it seems to be set on — a path that involves abstracting itself from the creation of real-world value. The final destination? It will enter a world entirely of its own — a world in which it is fighting to capture value that is completely independent of whether any is created in the first place."'

+ - GPS Fitness Data Sold to Oregon Transportation Dept

Submitted by nullchar
nullchar (446050) writes "The Oregon Department of Transportation has signed up for the Strava Metro GPS service for $20,000 USD. Strava is a mobile fitness app used by cyclists and runners to track their performance with GPS. Strava says the data set of over 300 billion GPS points it has collected worldwide are anonymized and aggregated to protect privacy. Oregon wishes to use the data to enhance it's bike lanes.

The active.com article poses some interesting questions (beware annoying "More:" links between every paragraph):

Strava pulls in position and speed data so accurately that it can often be used to identify what lane a cyclist is using on a particular road. With such accuracy, could the government use Strava data to figure out if a cyclist ran a stop sign or a stoplight? Could it be used in the event of an accident involving a vehicle to map a cyclist's behavior prior to a collision? This is just speculation, as the data is intended to be anonymous.

It would be easy for them to create a database of Strava's user-created "segments" to identify "hot spots" where cyclists may be riding in especially aggressive fashion. In his piece in Bicycling magazine on the Strava-related death of Kim Flint in 2010, David Darlington compared some of the site's "KOM" segments to illegal street racing. He even showed how easy it is to identify cyclists breaking the law by finding several KOM segment leaders who recorded speeds in excess of the posted speed limit.

"
Security

The Coming IT Nightmare of Unpatchable Systems 240

Posted by samzenpus
from the down-in-flames dept.
snydeq (1272828) writes "Insecure by design and trusted by default, embedded systems present security concerns that could prove crippling if not addressed by fabricators, vendors, and customers alike, InfoWorld reports. Routers, smart refrigerators, in-pavement traffic-monitoring systems, or crop-monitoring drones — 'the trend toward systems and devices that, once deployed, stubbornly "keep on ticking" regardless of the wishes of those who deploy them is fast becoming an IT security nightmare made real, affecting everything from mom-and-pop shops to power stations. This unpatchable hell is a problem with many fathers, from recalcitrant vendors to customers wary of — or hostile to — change. But with the number and diversity of connected endpoints expected to skyrocket in the next decade, radical measures are fast becoming necessary to ensure that today's "smart" devices and embedded systems don't haunt us for years down the line.'"

Comment: Re:Encryption (Score 1) 220

by psyclone (#47101899) Attached to: PHK: HTTP 2.0 Should Be Scrapped
How is the Auth1 scheme described above susceptible to offline dictionary attacks?

I'm assuming both client and server then exchange the Auth1 value to know if they can trust the other side: server would check for correct password, client would check for non-MITM server.

The supposed MITM would attempt to offline brute force the Passhash as they now know the inputs to the HMAC, and they know the correct Auth1 value?

To write good code is a worthy challenge, and a source of civilized delight. -- stolen and paraphrased from William Safire

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