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Comment: Re:How do you back up Ceph? (Score 5, Informative) 18

by ScuttleMonkey (#46880383) Attached to: Red Hat Acquires InkTank, Ceph Maintainers

(Inktank community guy here)

There are a number of different options for backup/disaster recovery solutions with Ceph, depending on what piece(s) of the platform you are using. For instance, the object gateways (think S3) from multiple clusters can be plugged together for multi-site replication. The CephFS and block device portions both have snapshotting built in that can be replicated offsite.

In the medium-term we're looking at having a way to replicate your entire cluster over the wire at the RADOS level (underlying object store). Longer-term we'd love to be able to offer WAN-scale replication for a single cluster and the ability to snapshot a cluster (or portions/pools therein) easily.

I hope that helps. If you have more questions hit me up on #ceph at OFTC.net IRC.

Comment: Re:What it needs is some beef (Score 1) 152

by ScuttleMonkey (#41769179) Attached to: Does OpenStack Need a Linus Torvalds?
As one AC already pointed out, you should check out Ceph (full disclaimer: I work for Inktank now, the consulting services company that employs most of the core Ceph devs). Ceph is, at its heart a Distributed Object store, but we allow you to access in a number of different ways:
  • * Native API
  • * Via a RESTful interface that can handle native Amazon S3 and Swift API calls
  • * As a thinly provisioned block device
  • * Mount it as a POSIX-compliant file system via CephFS (although this is a bit rough for production environments just yet)

Josh Durgin has actually done some really interesting work in using the block device (RBD) to back Cinder which you can read a bit about here.

The cool part about Ceph is it was designed to be massively scalable (petabytes and beyond) and extremely fault tolerant / HA / etc. DreamHost actually just built out a huge production deployment of Ceph and OpenStack for their new DreamCompute / DreamObjects offering. If you have questions feel free to hit up the #Ceph irc channel at irc.oftc.net or poke me via email (my UN at inktank.com) and I'll see if I can't find the right person to help.

OpenStack really has some awesome potential, and we're excited about poking at it more with our semi-sharp Ceph-stick. Good luck.

Comment: Storage advancements in the kernel? (Score -1, Redundant) 460

by ScuttleMonkey (#41587649) Attached to: Linus Torvalds Will Answer Your Questions
Now that Ceph is gathering momentum since having been included in the mainline kernel, what other storage (or low level) advancements do you see on the horizon?

(full disclosure: I work for Inktank now, the consulting/services company that employs most of the core Ceph engineers)
Intel

+ - Intel and Micron Unveil 128Gb 20nm NAND Flash->

Submitted by
ScuttleMonkey
ScuttleMonkey writes "A joint venture between Intel and Micron has given rise to a new 128Gb die. While production wont start until next year and distribution mostly likely not until 2013, this little beauty sets new bars for capacity, speed, and endurance. "Die shrinks also tend to reduce endurance, with old 65 m MLC flash being rated at 5,000-10,000 erase cycles, but that number dropping to 3,000-5,000 for 25nm MLC flash. However, IMFT is claiming that the shrink to 20nm has not caused any corresponding reduction in endurance. Its 20nm flash uses a Hi-K/metal gate design which allows it to make transistors that are smaller but no less robust. IMFT is claiming that this use of Hi-K/metal gate is a first for NAND flash production.""
Link to Original Source
Technology

+ - Stack Exchange Website Profiler Now Open Source->

Submitted by
ScuttleMonkey
ScuttleMonkey writes "Joel Spolsky sent out smoke signals this morning about the recent release of the Stack Exchange Website Profiler as open source. Sam Saffron expounds on why this profiler is perhaps "best and most comprehensive production web page profiler out there for any web platform." The project is available via Google Code or NuGet."
Link to Original Source

+ - Mainstream Media Looks at Anonymous->

Submitted by
ScuttleMonkey
ScuttleMonkey writes "In an uncharacteristically accurate writeup of Anonymous, the Guardian has published a look at the assembled mob behind the mask. A great place to send those unfamiliar with who or what Anonymous really is. 'This collective identity belongs to no one in particular, but is at the disposal of anyone who knows its rules and knows how to apply them. Anonymous, the collective identity, is older than Anonymous, the hacktvist group – more to the point, I propose that the hacktivist group can be understood as an application of Anonymous, the collective identity.'"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Do nothing (Score 1) 709

by ScuttleMonkey (#33736920) Attached to: Could Anti-Texting Laws Make Roads More Dangerous?
While I agree the gene pool could use a bit more chlorine...what happens when one of these undesirables happens to jump the curb and take out a Stephen Hawking, Albert Einstein, etc? It's not just the individual hurting themselves which is what drives the lawmakers to action. Personally I'm all for on-the-spot executions for any infraction, just watch out for the white fences. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708739/
Businesses

+ - Startups a Safer Bet Than Behemoths->

Submitted by
ScuttleMonkey
ScuttleMonkey writes "TechCrunch's Vivek Wadhwa has a great article that takes a look at difference between startups and "established" tech companies and what they each mean to the economy and innovation in general. Wadhwa examines statistics surrounding job creation and innovation and while big companies may acquire startups and prove out the business model, the risk and true innovations seems to be living at the startup level almost exclusively. 'Now let’s talk about innovation. Apple is the poster child for tech innovation; it releases one groundbreaking product after another. But let’s get beyond Apple. I challenge you to name another tech company that innovates like Apple—with game-changing technologies like the iPod, iTunes, iPhone, and iPad. Google certainly doesn’t fit the bill—after its original search engine and ad platform, it hasn’t invented anything earth shattering. Yes, Google did develop a nice email system and some mapping software, but these were incremental innovations. For that matter, what earth-shattering products have IBM, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, or Cisco produced in recent times? These companies constantly acquire startups and take advantage of their own size and distribution channels to scale up the innovations they have purchased.'"
Link to Original Source
Communications

Bluetooth 4.0 Devices To Make the Scene Later This Year 48

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the still-look-like-a-blue-tool dept.
Engadget is reporting that new Bluetooth 4.0 devices could be hitting the scene later this year, and it looks like Bluetooth low energy has been added to the spec. "But don't expect any dramatic changes in battery life for most of your gadgets: while the low energy spec introduces connectivity to a host of lower-power devices that have in the past relied on proprietary technology (such as watches, pedometers, and cats), your traditional Bluetooth devices, such as phones and laptops, will consume roughly the same amount of power. Indeed, the low energy spec is merely throwing smaller devices (with smaller amounts of data to transfer) in to the mix: if you want Trans-Siberian Orchestra to sound as glorious as ever on your wireless headphones, you'll need to push as much data (and hence draw as much power) with version 4 as you would with version 3."
Microsoft

Microsoft "Courier" Pictures 230

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the bandwagon-or-shark-jumping dept.
tekgoblin writes to let us know that Gizmodo has some early shots of the new prototype "Courier" booklet (foldable tablet) on the way from Microsoft. "Courier is a real device, and we've heard that it's in the 'late prototype' stage of development. It's not a tablet, it's a booklet. The dual 7-inch (or so) screens are multitouch, and designed for writing, flicking and drawing with a stylus, in addition to fingers. They're connected by a hinge that holds a single iPhone-esque home button. Statuses, like wireless signal and battery life, are displayed along the rim of one of the screens. On the back cover is a camera, and it might charge through an inductive pad, like the Palm Touchstone charging dock for Pre."
Idle

+ - Couple raises virtual child.. and starves real one->

Submitted by NeutronCowboy
NeutronCowboy (896098) writes "According to CNN.com, a South Korean couple was arrested for allowing their baby to starve to death while they were out at an internet cafe. One of their activities there: raising a virtual child in the online game "Prius Online." While a South Korean professor calls it a case of Internet Addiction, it's probably more a case of bad coping mechanisms: they were jobless and had apparently little to look forward to."
Link to Original Source
Patents

Dr. NakaMats Is the World's Most Prolific Inventor 194

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the patent-troll-slayer dept.
MMBK writes to share an interesting look at Dr. "NakaMats" Nakamatsu, mastermind behind a world-record 3,000 patents. The 81-year-old scientist has inventions like the "PyonPyon" spring shoes, the karaoke machine, and others. He's also at least partly to blame for things like the digital watch, the floppy disk, and CDs. "Dr. Nakamatsu harbors other ambitions too: in 2007, he took his penchant for political campaigning to a new level, becoming a candidate in the gubernatorial election in Tokyo, and the election for the Upper House. Although he failed to get a seat, Dr. NakaMats has other tricks up his sleeve. In 2005 he was awarded the Ig Nobel prize for Nutrition, for photographing and retrospectively analyzing every meal he has consumed during a period of 34 years (and counting). By the time he dies at the age of 144 (a goal he maintains with an elaborate daily ritual that rejuvenates his body and triggers his creative process), he intends to patent 6,000 inventions."
Hardware

New Heat-Reduced Magnetic Solder Could Revolutionize Chip Design 103

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the vaporware-until-i-see-chips dept.
A new heat-reduced soldering technique using magnets may lead to some revolutionary changes in the way chips are manufactured. Details are scant since the inventor seems to be playing it close to the vest for now in hopes of attracting chipmaker interest. "The result is a tin-silver alloy that contains a dispersion of iron particles tens of micrometers in diameter. When a magnetic field is applied to the solders, two things happen. First, the iron particles heat up, locally melting the solder. This localized heating, which works on the same principle as inductive stoves, remains completely contained, keeping the surrounding area cool. And second, the iron particles line up with the direction of the magnetic field, squeezing and pushing the liquid in that direction. This alignment is retained when the solder solidifies, and the well-ordered particles provide mechanical reinforcement that's greater than that afforded by a regular dispersion of particles."
Portables

Asus Takes Another Stab at Revolutionizing Netbook Market 162

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the betting-on-the-design-team dept.
Perhaps most well known for their netbook innovations with the Eee PC, Asus is at it again with their latest rollout at CeBIT Germany. The "Waveface Light," a new concept laptop, can be used as a conventional laptop or converted to a tablet by removing the keyboard and opening it to a completely flat position. Sounds like either a stroke of genius or a "small widget broke and now it's worthless" design issue.

The only thing cheaper than hardware is talk.

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