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Comment: Re:Fuck them sideways with a rusty chainsaw! (Score 1) 117

by pspahn (#48017827) Attached to: World's Smallest 3G Module Will Connect Everything To the Internet

What they are sorting for is people stupid enough to give an insurance company another excuse.

I'd wager that what they are after is a treasure trove of data on what kind of people are driving where at what times. That is valuable data that will fetch a snappy price from the highest bidder.

Comment: Re:IOT (Score 1) 117

by pspahn (#48017799) Attached to: World's Smallest 3G Module Will Connect Everything To the Internet

Most of the potential I see involves anything that generates data which can later be sold. It's not about making our lives better, it's about making money.

These things will probably end up in a pair of shoes so that citizens can be tracked ... er ... ahem ... so that people who like running can have their data visualized into a useful format.

Comment: Re:Yeah sorry, no (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48017375) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

because 99.9% of the tourists (including you, it sounds)

Honestly, and with few exceptions (Black Canyon being one, but that's a permit that can take years to get), I prefer to stay out of the National Parks, as they tend to be exactly the type of place I am looking to avoid when I visit nature. Yes, you can avoid the crowds and go hike in somewhere. Even then you're dealing with a bunch of weekend warriors (including you, it sounds) that get territorial about camp sites and cock-sure with all that fancy gear that gets used twice ... maybe three times before it sits in the garage for six years collecting dust.

Go on a single day hike (several days in a row, of course) up and down a Western river canyon. If you know what you're doing, you can time the bug hatch with the off-peak Mondays and Tuesdays following holidays so as to also avoid all that weekend warrior traffic to and from the cities as a bonus.

Even beyond that, "camping" should not involve a 3-4 day hike to get somewhere to avoid crowds. That's called backpacking. The camping I refer to in my previous comment is done on gravel lots with a parking space adjacent and a number on a post and some over-zealous retiree driving around in a golf cart. This fact alone makes your entire post redundant.

Comment: Re:Yeah sorry, no (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48004435) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

I was also not talking libre not gratis when I wrote free.

Either way, National Parks are among the most restricted places in the country. You can't have dogs. You pay to get in. You have to stay on the trails. Any kind of fishing/hunting is highly restricted. Camping involves setting up a tent in what amounts to a parking lot.

National Parks have a lot of beauty and I appreciate some of these rules, but they are definitely not places where you are free to do as you wish.

Comment: Re:Should we jump to conclusions? (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48004383) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

Sure, let's find out. I was heading up to Indian Peaks Wilderness this weekend to take some fall color photos. I have a tripod that looks and acts more like a hiking staff. My girlfriend was going to wear a nice dress, so I guess she's going to be a model.

And in the event I actually see anyone else up there, I'll be sure to let them know where to find my permit.

Comment: Re:Yeah sorry, no (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48004123) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

It's no mystery as to why the number of board feet of timber harvested in NFS controlled lands in 1988 was nearly 12 billion, while in 1999 it was less than 2 billion (2013 was a similar number).

While I don't discount the fact that presidential policies might have had an effect, but do you think that maybe there were less trees harvested in 2013 because they had all either died and decomposed or burned already? Take a trip to a Western forest affected by Mountain Pine Beetle and it will be evident when you look up the mountain side and see 90% of the trees standing dead. Here's some images that should give you an idea

Comment: Re:Yeah sorry, no (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48004057) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

In fact, if you're on the lands managed by the FS and you don't have a permit you're likely there illegally. It's the national parks that you have free access to.

Where do these people come from? Free access to National Parks? Hardly. While I admit that a National Parks Pass is one of the greatest deals around, it is certainly not free. National Forest, on the other hand, I have never once paid to use (outside of camping with friends that prefer to use the paid campgrounds instead of open forest access). I did pay I think $7 to get a firewood permit when I lived in Summit County (allowed to cut standing-dead beetle kill only), so that wasn't free, but it was hundreds of dollars cheaper than buying the firewood for the winter. Also, I will admit that tomorrow the National Parks will be free (instead of the $10-25 entrance fee you would normally pay).

Most of the lands you are going onto as an outdoorsman are managed by the NPS and not the FS.

I would be curious to see what you come up with as a citation. The majority of Federal land is in the West. The majority of that land in the west is part of the Forest Service. There's lot of National Parks as well, but their area is nothing compared to NFS and/or BLM land.

I am an avid fisherman, and I can probably count on a single hand the number of times I've bothered to fish in a National Park. With few exceptions (Slough Creek and some of the other "Holy Grail" type streams that exist in National Parks) there are just too many people to have any fun. National Forests, on the other hand, are generally the best places to go for public fishing access.

Comment: Re:Yeah sorry, no (Score 1) 299

by pspahn (#48003853) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

You do know, logging is only allowed in National Forests, and not National Parks, right? Just checking.

Except we're talking about neither. We're talking about Wilderness Areas. Resource extraction does exist in Wilderness Areas, though it is quite limited and generally due to those acts being grandfathered in since they occurred before the Wilderness Act. Also, FTFA:

Close didn't cite any real-life examples of why the policy is needed or what problems it's addressing.

It's tough for the media to report on this story accurately when the Forest Service won't even acknowledge why this policy is necessary or what situations it addresses. Without that everyone is simply left to guess what this is all about.

Comment: Re: Forest Circus. (Score 2) 299

by pspahn (#48003767) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

-1 Overrated. This is just not true and those who modded it up should feel shame.

This might be true for some very specific, high-traffic and relatively accessible wilderness areas (Gunnison Gorge comes to mind) but not so for the rest. Generally you will only need a permit to camp overnight during summer. Many times permits aren't required outside of June 1 - Sept 15. Additionally, many permits cost nothing and are self-issued by the user. I know they do this in the Maroon Bells due to being the one of the most photographed wilderness area in the country as well as being a particularly dangerous hike due to loose rock and lots of traffic.

Aside from these basic measures, there are also permits for collecting firewood, Christmas trees, and other forest products (varies by region).

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