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+ - DOJ: If we can track one American, we can track all Americans->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Seven months after his conviction, Basaaly Moalin’s defense attorney moved for a new trial (PDF), arguing that evidence collected about him under the government’s recently disclosed dragnet telephone surveillance program violated his constitutional and statutory rights. Moalin’s is the only thwarted "terrorist plot" against America that the government says also "critically" relied on the National Security Agency phone surveillance program, conducted under Section 215 of the Patriot Act.

The government’s response (PDF), filed on September 30th, is a heavily redacted opposition arguing that when law enforcement can monitor one person’s information without a warrant, it can monitor everyone’s information, “regardless of the collection’s expanse.” Notably, the government is also arguing that no one other than the company that provided the information—including the defendant in this case—has the right to challenge this disclosure in court."

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+ - Imagination Tech Announces MIPS-based 'Warrior P-Class' CPU Core->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "Imagination Technologies has announced the first CPU based on its new version of the MIPS architecture. The new P5600 chip (codenamed Warrior) is a 32-bit CPU based on the MIPS Series 5 architecture and is designed to challenge companies like ARM in the embedded and mobile markets. Major features of the new chip include: support for 40-bit memory extensions, or up to 1TB of RAM, a 128-bit SIMD engine (Single Instruction, Multiple Data), and Hardware virtualization (MIPS R5 can virtualize other machines in hardware). The P5600 core is being touted as supporting up to six cores in a cache-coherent link, most likely similar to ARM's CCI-400. According to IT, the chip is capable of executing 3.5 DMIPs/MHz in CoreMark, which theoretically puts the P5600 on par with the Cortex-A15."
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+ - Irony: Google's CIO doesn't let employees use "consumer-grade" cloud services->

Submitted by mattydread23
mattydread23 (2793761) writes "This takes the cake. In an interview with AllThingsD this weekend, Google CIO Ben Fried explained that he "can't let employees mess around with consumer-grade technology" and that he won't let employees use Dropbox because "when your users use it in a corporate context, your corporate data is being held in someone else’s data center." This from the CIO of the company that has done more to push consumer-grade cloud services into the enterprise than anybody else. Apparently it's "do as we say, not as we do.""
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+ - Deutsche Telekom Wants To Introduce 'Secure Emails' That Will Not Leave Germany->

Submitted by dryriver
dryriver (1010635) writes "From Thelocal.de: "Germany’s biggest communications company, Deutsche Telekom, has put forward plans for the country to use German only connections in a bid to combat the threat of foreign spy agencies and hackers.The former state-owned communications giant outlined the plans at a secret meeting in the Economy Ministry, according to magazine Wirtschaftswoche. The country's three biggest email providers, Deutsche Telekom, GMX and Web.de, announced in August that they would bolster security by encrypting their email traffic. But Telekom now wants to go a step further by using domestic only connections to protect the private data of German users in the wake of the NSA spying scandal. Whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed a massive electronic surveillance programme by the US and British security agencies. Email data is currently exchanged between users worldwide via international network hubs, where the data is processed and then sent on to its destination. But this system has come into disrepute since information leaked by Snowden showed the US and UK governments had used the hubs to spy on millions of private emails. Deutsche Telekom's plan would change the system so that emails between German users are no longer transferred via the international hubs, but stay in networks within German borders. 'We want to guarantee that between sender and receiver in Germany, not a single byte leaves the country, or even crosses the border temporarily,' explained Thomas Kremer, the firm's director of data protection. But on Monday it was unclear how Deutsche Telekom would achieve this feat, which would also require the company's competitors to agree to bypass the international hubs, some of which are in the UK.""
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+ - Lessons from the Healthcare.gov Fiasco->

Submitted by Nerval's Lobster
Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "In theory, the federal government’s Health Insurance Marketplace was supposed to make things easy for anyone in the market for health insurance. But fourteen days after the Website made its debut, the online initiative—an integral part of the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act—has metastasized into a disaster. Despite costing $400 million (so far) and employing an army of experienced IT contractors (such as Booz Allen Hamilton and CGI Group), the Website is prone to glitches and frequent crashes, frustrating many of those seeking to sign up for a health-insurance policy. Unless you’re the head of a major federal agency or a huge company launching an online initiative targeted at millions of users, it’s unlikely you’ll be the one responsible for a project (and problems) on the scale of the Health Insurance Marketplace. Nonetheless, the debacle offers some handy lessons in project management for Websites and portals of any size: know your IT specifications (federal contractors reportedly didn't receive theirs until a few months ago), choose management capable of recognizing the problems that arise (management of Healthcare.gov was entrusted to the Medicare and Medicaid agency, which didn't have the technical chops), roll out small if possible, and test, test, test. The Health Insurance Marketplace fiasco speaks to an unfortunate truth about Web development: even when an entity (whether public or private, corporation or federal government) has keen minds and millions of dollars at its disposal, forgetting or mishandling the basics of successful Web construction can lead to embarrassing problems."
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+ - Small-scale biomass energy projects are not a solution to climate change-> 1

Submitted by Lasrick
Lasrick (2629253) writes "Roberto Bissio has an excellent piece in a roundtable on biomass energy, pointing out that small scale biomass energy projects designed for people in poor countries aren't really a solution to climate change. After pointing out that patent protections could impede wide-spread adoption, Bissio adds that the people in these countries aren't really contributing to climate change in the first place: 'Why? Because poor people, whose carbon emissions these technologies would reduce, produce very little carbon in the first place. As I mentioned in Round One, the planet's poorest 1 billion people are responsible for only 3 percent of global carbon emissions. The 1.26 billion people whose countries belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development account for 42 percent of emissions. The rich, if they reduced their emissions by just 8 percent, could achieve more climate mitigation than the poor could achieve by reducing their emissions to zero. The rich could manage this 8 percent reduction by altering their lifestyles in barely noticeable ways. For the poor, a reduction of 100 percent would imply permanent misery.'"
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+ - Massachusetts bans Google Apps-> 2

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""Any person who provides a cloud computing service to an educational institution operating within the State shall process data of a student enrolled in kindergarten through twelfth grade for the sole purpose of providing the cloud computing service to the educational institution and shall not process such data for any commercial purpose, including but not limited to advertising purposes that benefit the cloud computing service provider,

"Schools must ensure that they place appropriate limits on data collection and use best practices for cloud service providers,"

"Protecting the privacy of our students is common sense and shouldn't be sold to the highest bidder. Student privacy should not be for sale. Period." Cameron Evans, Microsoft"

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Google

+ - Developers Begin Hunt for A Killer App for Google Glass->

Submitted by
holy_calamity
holy_calamity writes "Companies large and small are working to create the first "killer app" for Google Glass, the wearable display to go on sale later this year, reports MIT Technology Review. Evernote is among large companies that got early access to prototypes and has been testing ideas for some time, but is staying quiet about its plans. Meanwhile new startups with apps for Glass are being created and funded, although uncertainty about whether consumers will embrace the technology has steered them towards commercial and industrial ideas, such as apps for for doctors and maintenance technicians."
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+ - Internet Explorer below 50% worldwide; its'a first->

Submitted by pmarini
pmarini (989354) writes "There are many websites that provide web usage statistics, but this one seems the most accurate as it provides data by country and region, therefore making it possible to easily compare and relate to each local situation.
Based on this website, Internet Explorer has lost the absolute "reign" on the interwebs by staying below 50% for most of the month of September (it's the 20th today)... good news everyone... :-)"

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Image

Russian Scholar Warns Of US Climate Change Weapon 415

Posted by samzenpus
from the hurricane-cannon dept.
According to Russian political scientist, and conspiracy aficionado Andrei Areshev the high heat, and poor crop yields of Russia, and other Central Asian countries may be the result of a climate weapon created by the US military. From the article: "... Areshev voiced suspicions about the High-Frequency Active Aural Research Program (HAARP), funded by the US Defense Department and the University of Alaska. HAARP, which has long been the target of conspiracy theorists, analyzes the ionosphere and seeks to develop technologies to improve radio communications, surveillance, and missile detection. Areshev writes, however, that its true aim is to create new weapons of mass destruction 'in order to destabilize environmental and agricultural systems in local countries.'"
Security

Employees Would Steal Data When Leaving a Job 457

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the what-about-business-cards dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Employees openly admit they would take company data, including customer data and product plans, when leaving a job. In response to a recent survey, 49% of US workers and 52% of British workers admitted they would take some form of company property with them when leaving a position: 29% (US) and 23% (UK) would take customer data, including contact information; 23% (US) and 22% (UK) would take electronic files; 15% (US) and 17% (UK) would take product information, including designs and plans; and 13% (US) and 22% (UK) would take small office supplies."
Privacy

Court Rejects Warrantless GPS Tracking 226

Posted by kdawson
from the don't-tag-me-bro dept.
The EFF is trumpeting a victory in a case in which it and the ACLU filed an amicus brief. "The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit today firmly rejected government claims that federal agents have an unfettered right to install Global Positioning System (GPS) location-tracking devices on anyone's car without a search warrant. ... The court agreed that such round-the-clock surveillance required a search warrant based on probable cause. ...the court noted: 'When it comes to privacy... the whole may be more revealing than its parts.'"

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