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Comment Re:i love them! (Score 2) 254

An ESP8266 WiFi board, with easily reprogrammable firmware (you can even download firmware that runs lua scripts, e.g., a web server in a few lines of code), is $2.69 shipped on ebay. But the Dash also gets you a button and a battery, and that might be worth it depending on your application.

Comment Re:Done to _gouge_ the customer better (Score 1) 378

If most of their customers aren't using off-brand or foreign cartridges, then Xerox isn't losing money from these customers using off-brand or foreign cartridges.

Without the locking, Xerox is only losing money from those customers who would otherwise use off-brand or foreign cartridges. And _these_ customers might well abandon Xerox if the locking is in place. Whether this would be a net loss to Xerox depends on (a) whether they make any money on the printers themselves, (b) how likely they are to leave Xerox and (c) how much money Xerox makes on the foreign cartridges.

Comment Re: Do most of the work? (Score 2) 443

Renaming a field or method of a class is more tricky with an editor, though, since other classes may have a field or method with the same name and you may not want to rename those.
It's also nice not to have to remember or look up APIs, constant names, etc.

As a teenager, I used Borland IDEs (mainly Turbo C). Then I spent over a decade mainly using commandline tools (C and assembly). But then since starting Android development some years ago, I've gotten to appreciate IDEs enough that now sometimes I even write LaTeX presentations and articles in Eclipse and short python scripts in Visual Studio. (If only loading time were faster.)

Over my decade of commandline development, I also forgot how helpful a GUI debugger can be and only rediscovered it recently.

Comment Re:Code is not a weapon (Score 2) 312

You could roll up a blueprint and hit someone with it. Not a very effective weapon, but a weapon nonetheless. And a drawing can be used to inflict papercuts. It's harder to hurt someone with code, though I guess you could drive someone to pull out their hair upon seeing how badly written it is.

Comment Re: Only things left cost more to do than you'd ma (Score 1) 421

Most of the apps I make are based on something that I want. I make it largely for myself, and then it turns out other people want it, too.
There are plenty of things that need to be done, at least on Android.
For instance:
A night vision preserving red/green screen mode app for astronomers and others who like to use phones in the dark (chainfire had one but last I checked it stopped working with Android 4.0; I made one that worked with some Galaxy phones, but it doesn't work with recent ones).
An ebook reader app aimed at serious scholarly text study that supports large corpora with fast indexed boolean search and automatic alternate spellings (I like to work with 17th century French texts :-) ).
An astronomy app with fully expandable object databases and integration with sky survey photography.

Comment Re: Claim is BS. (Score 1) 155

The LCD version also has the advantage of not having parallax problems when reading. Different heights of drivers look at the dials from different angles and if the needles are, say, a millimeter in front of the backing, different readings result. The fuel gauge when close to empty is one case where this can make a difference.
(Personally I prefer numerical gauges: I all faster with numbers than interpolation, and I prefer to look at speed on the GPS than the dashboard.)

Prototype designs always work. -- Don Vonada

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