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Networking

+ - Three-strike "Hadopi" law thrown out in Fr

Submitted by
pruneau
pruneau writes "Breaking new on the French legal scene: the french constitutional council just throw the three-strike "Hadopi" law out. The gist of the rejection of the law is that having an administrative entity (the infamous HADOPI council) making legal decision, like banning someone from using the internet, is unconstitutional in France. The french official opposition is of course gloating about the big setback this represents for the French president, whose team has been pushing hard to get this law through."

Comment: Re:radio in the computer case: the music of... (Score 1) 731

by pruneau (#27771841) Attached to: Old-School Coding Techniques You May Not Miss
I did this with my first "programming" love, a Texas Instrument Ti-57.

Since I was doing "undercover" programming (i.e. programming at night when I was supposed to sleep ;-), I discovered pretty quickly that the beast was making noise, a lot of different ones. I quickly learned the sound of a running program, the noise of an error, and the sound of a few number being displayed as well.

I then kept this habit since, learning the sound of a properly running computer, and being able to tell when the beast is trashing, and so on.

Of course, with all those new-fangled virtual hosts, I'm missing a lot of cue about the system I'm working with. This is sad, my friend, really sad.

Google

+ - Who needs Google, when you have 'Knowledge In'->

Submitted by
pruneau
pruneau writes ""No matter how powerful Google's search engine may be, it doesn't have enough Korean-language data to trawl to satisfy South Korean customers," said Wayne Lee, an analyst at Woori Investment and Securities.

Naver's success surprised many. When NHN, an online gaming company, set up the search portal in 1999, the site looked like a grocery store where most of the shelves were empty. Like Google, Naver found that with few people other than Koreans using the language, there simply was not enough Korean text in cyberspace to make a Korean search engine a viable business.

"So we began creating Korean-language text," said Lee Kyung Ryul, an NHN spokesman. "At Google, users basically look for data that already exists on the Internet. In South Korea, if you want to be a search engine, you have to create your own database.""

Link to Original Source

New York Times: New Chief at Sony Ericsson Venture->

From feed by nytfeed
Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications named Hideki Komiyama as its new top executive on Tuesday as it announced that Miles Flint will step down for personal reasons. Mr. Flint, who became president of the company in 2004 and helped bring the venture to profitability, will remain executive adviser to Mr. Komiyama, currently chairman of Sony Electronics, until the end of the year. Mr. Komiyama will take up his position Nov. 1. Sony Ericsson, based in London, was founded in 2001 as a joint venture of Ericsson of Stockholm and Sony of Tokyo.
Link to Original Source
Microsoft

Microsoft Details FOSS Patent Breaches 576

Posted by Zonk
from the just-a-little-bit-dangerous dept.
CptRevelation writes "Microsoft has released more detailed information on the patents supposedly in breach by the open-source community. Despite their accusations of infringement, they state they would rather do licensing deals instead of any legal action. 'Open-source programs step on 235 Microsoft patents, the company said. Free Linux software violates 42 patents. Graphical user interfaces, the way menus and windows look on the screen, breach 65. E-mail programs step on 15, and other programs touch 68 other patents, the company said. The patent figures were first reported by Fortune magazine. Microsoft also said Open Office, an open-source program supported in part by Sun Microsystems Inc., infringes on 45 patents. Sun declined to comment on the allegation.'"
IBM

+ - Big Blue set to go Big Green

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "Looks like Big Blue wants to be Big Green. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that IBM tomorrow will launch a major push to help customers cut their data center energy bills and redesign their data centers to be more environmentally friendly. IBM is calling its plan "project Big Green," and is comparing it to the commitment it made 10 years ago to embrace the Internet and later Linux free software, both for its own use and as a service business for corporate and government customers, the WSJ says. The service will be manned by 1,000 services experts from its Global Service division. According to the WSJ, IBM will says it expects to be able to double the current computing capacity of its own data centers by 2010 without using additional energy. It said that would avoid about $500 million in electricity costs it would otherwise have endured. http://www.networkworld.com/community/?q=node/1500 3"
Communications

+ - PCMCIA WiMax Card Finally?

Submitted by
livnah
livnah writes "In a press release last week (http://www.clearwire.com/company/news/05_01_07.ph p), Clearwire announced that they'd be offering their customers WiMax connectivity via a new Motorola Type-II PCMCIA card at some date later this year. From the release:

The FCC's approval of our laptop card is a significant milestone in bringing to market a 'true broadband' wireless service with a device that facilitates even greater portability than our existing modem permits," said Perry Satterlee, Clearwire president and chief operating officer. "We expect the new laptop card to broaden our potential customer base with more opportunities for customers to access and experience our fast, simple, portable, reliable and affordable wireless broadband services."
Businesses

+ - Work is work, right?

Submitted by
livnah
livnah writes "In a recent AskSlashdot posting (http://ask.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/05/09/1 728252), Pikoro asked what to do or where to go when he hits the top of the IT food-chain and finds that his work is "more work than play". Is it possible that in today's world we're overlooking that work is ... work? Granted, work should be as enjoyable as possible — when you enjoy your work your productivity increases — but are we expecting too much these days? Do we need to re-evaluate our requirement for a high joy-factor while in the workplace?"
Intel

+ - Eight-core computing

Submitted by Alan
Alan (666) writes "FiringSquad just posted a review of the Intel V8 Platform, a dual quad-core Xeon system. With 8 total CPU cores, this system has more computational horsepower than most of the supercomputers on the original Top 100 List from 1993! What was surprising is that more and more applications are taking advantage of multicore processors — Excel 2007 is multicore aware and it makes good use of the additional processing power. However, even embarassingly parallel problems failed to scale well on 8 cores when memory bandwidth is limited."

Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll invite himself over for dinner. - Calvin Keegan

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