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Comment: Re:LEDs (Score 1) 585

by hawk (#48007051) Attached to: The Great Lightbulb Conspiracy

The ballast in a CFL can't handle the dimmer.

Its not that you replace the dimmer,but that you need to use "cold cathode" florescent bulbs with them--andin the smaller sizes (candelabra mount), you can't get these (or LED) that are very strong.

My house has been almost completely devoid of incandescent for about ten years--more initially for heat (broken AC in the Vegas desert!) than power.

The only place they're left are in the refrigerator (don't want mercury there if it breaks . . .) and oven (heat). But the socket is bad in the refrigerator, and the oven is dead an needs replacing, leaving only the halogens in the stove hood. Inadequate LEDs in the ceiling fans family & dining room (3 25 watt equiv, all I can find), and just about everythign ese is CFL (and will slowly swap out to LED as they fail)

hawk

Comment: Re:Bogus justification (Score 3, Informative) 299

by Loki_1929 (#48000327) Attached to: Forest Service Wants To Require Permits For Photography

In other words, if you're Brian Williams and you'd like to film a news story there, you have every right to do so. If you're Michael Bay and you want to film a movie there, somebody probably needs to step in and put a stop to it before the forest is obliterated by a multi-kiloton series of non-nuclear explosions and scantily clad women running around between them.

Comment: Re:Oh good (Score 3, Interesting) 903

by hawk (#47998277) Attached to: Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

And even you are understating the matter.

I once represented the general manager of the biggest one of those in town on another matter.

Breakeven is on sale: the down payment is set to what they paid at auction. They sell, collect a few payments, repo, sell again . . .

Their idea of a good car is one they get to sell 3 or 4 times.

hawk, esq.

Comment: Re:Leave the PhD off your CV for a couple of years (Score 1) 471

by hawk (#47980209) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

>Relatively few people pick up a masters on their way to a doctorate.

Highly dependent upon field. In mine (economics), the masters is a sidestep. In others, its the norm.

And at some schools, there is a payment to the school for each master's awarded, so they're handed out along the way . . /

hawk

Comment: Re:List the STL? Seriously? (Score 1) 471

by hawk (#47980185) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

read the archives of alt.folklore.computers for great examples of some of these.

Swapping registers (in a two register + ALU architecture ) used to be a common one; you'll find an answer that was a step faster than the "correct" answer by using XOR in there.

My favorite, though, was handing the candidate a piece of convoluted code and asking what it did.

"Hopefully, it got the author fired." :)

hawk

Comment: Re:List the STL? Seriously? (Score 1) 471

by hawk (#47980043) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

As a first year college student hired after high school in a startup, I had a real eye opener when the person they brought in after me--with a MS in CS--couldn't, well, do much (they'd called me back after I left).

I finally had to take a stack of cards to manually demonstrate a bubble sort. No, I'm not defending or advocating bubble sorts. With an MS, he just plain didn't understand the concept.

His output roughly quadrupled once I was around (he wasn't around much longer).

And I've seen it in other areas. I have a Ph.D. in Economics and and statistics as well as a law degree, and I've met people in both who can function their way through the classes and dissertation, but just plain can't do anything useful in the fields.

hawk, j.d., ph.d., esq.

Comment: Re:List the STL? Seriously? (Score 1) 471

by hawk (#47980009) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

I always ask something completely and utterly off the wall or irrelevant when interviewing someone, just to see how he reacts to the unexpected. I'm not concerned with the answer; I just want to see how the person reacts to the unexpected.

I also instruct, "call before sending resume" in the ad, just to screen for ability to follow basic instructions (at least 75% fail at this rate).

hawk

Comment: Re:What's your suggestion for intelligence work? (Score 1) 504

by daveschroeder (#47938235) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

An oversimplification. The US, UK, and allies variously broke many cipher systems throughout WWII. Still the US benefitted from this.

What if the Germans were using, say, Windows, Android phones, SSL, Gmail, Yahoo, and Skype, instead of Enigma machines?

Comment: What's your suggestion for intelligence work? (Score 1) 504

by daveschroeder (#47938053) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

I presume you wouldn't say it was "wrong" of the United States to crack the German and Japanese codes in WWII...

...so when US adversaries (and lets just caveat this by saying people YOU, personally, agree are legitimate US adversaries) don't use their own "codes", but instead share the same systems, networks, services, devices, cloud providers, operating systems, encryption schemes, and so on, that Americans and much of the rest of the world uses, would you suggest that they should be off limits?

This isn't so much a law enforcement question as a question of how to do SIGINT in the modern digital world, but given the above, and given that intelligence requires secrecy in order to be effective, how would you suggest the United States go after legitimate targets? Or should we not be able to, because that power "might" be able to be abused -- as can any/all government powers, by definition?

This simplistic view that the only purpose of the government in a free and democratic society must be to somehow subjugate, spy on, and violate the rights of its citizens is insane, while actual totalitarian and non-free states, to say nothing of myriad terrorist and other groups, press their advantage. And why wouldn't they? The US and its ever-imperfect system of law is not the great villain in the world.

Take a step back and get some perspective. And this is not a rhetorical question: if someone can tell me their solution for how we should be able to target technologies that are fundamentally shared with innocent Americans and foreigners everywhere while still keeping such sources, methods, capabilities, and techniques secret, I'm all ears. And if you believe the second a technology is shared it should become magically off-limits because power might be abused, you are insane -- or, more to the point, you believe you have some moral high ground which, ironically, would actually result in severe disadvantages for the system of free society you would claim to support.

Comment: Re:Great one more fail (Score 1) 600

by Loki_1929 (#47924143) Attached to: High School Student Builds Gun That Unlocks With Your Fingerprint

The US Constitution was an open declaration of treason against the Crown, which at the time controlled the most powerful military the world had ever seen. It was signed by farmers, lawyers, and doctors who had little in the way of protection against that army and little chance of surviving the fight. To say it was anything less than a suicide pact is absurd. The fact that few alive in this country today have their intestinal fortitude speaks volumes to why we're in decline. They had balls. Somewhere along the way, we lost them.

And if you don't think voting leads to people dying, you aren't paying attention.

16.5 feet in the Twilight Zone = 1 Rod Serling

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