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Comment: I learned to program (Score 3, Interesting) 228

by presidentbeef (#23642757) Attached to: Inside the TRS-80 Model 100
on one of these that my uncle gave me. Pretty much changed my life.

What this article really failed to mention was the software side. You could program anything on the computer in BASIC and the LCD screen made it easy to create and position graphics (no need to worry about resolution - each pixel is always in exactly the same place and precisely the same number characters will always fit on the screen.) Made for years of writing games and applications on that thing. This is really something the "laptops for kids" people should be thinking about.
The Internet

+ - Email in the 18th century 2

Submitted by morphovar
morphovar (1205804) writes "More than 200 years ago it was already possible to send messages throughout Europe and America at the speed of an aeroplane — wireless and without need for electricity. The optical telegraph network consisted of a chain of towers, each placed 5 to 20 kilometres apart from each other. Every tower had a telegrapher, looking through a telescope at the previous tower in the chain. If the semaphore on that tower was put into a certain position, the telegrapher copied that symbol on his own tower. A message could be transmitted from Amsterdam to Venice in one hour's time. A few years before, a messenger on a horse would have needed at least a month's time to do the same."
Music

+ - Musicians Now Have Options says David Byrne

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "Former Talking Head David Byrne has seen the music business from both sides first as an artist then running his own record label, Luaka Bop, and says the future of music as a career is wide open. In an article in Wired, Byrne identifies six different distribution models now available to musicians. At one end of the scale is the 360, or equity, deal, where every aspect of the artist's career is handled by producers, promoters, marketing people, and managers. At the other end of the scale is the self-distribution model, where the music is self-produced, self-written, self-played, and self-marketed. Between these two extremes are four other models offering different levels of artist control. "No single model will work for everyone," says Bryne. "There's room for all of us. In the recent past, it often seemed like all or nothing, but maybe now we won't be forced to choose.""

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