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Comment: Re:Possible to store encrypted email? (Score 1) 187

by praxis (#47922699) Attached to: Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

Yes, but it's between your MUA and your server. S/MIME, as far as I know, does not do server-to-sender public key exchange. If I send a signed message to you, then you have my public key and can encrypt messages to me, yes, but you can't get my public key from the server.

Frankly, S/MIME is really the best solution available today. It works with gmail (not web-mail but using a MUA). Most MUAs support it. It's easy to get a free personal S/MIME keypair from a CA. Google, Apple or whoever you use for mail never sees your private key and can't read your messages.

Comment: Re:Just wait (Score 1) 388

by praxis (#47921221) Attached to: Apple Edits iPhone 6's Protruding Camera Out of Official Photos

The subject of the photograph does not have zero thickness. The camera focal point could be along the plane of the front of the subject, which would make it *not* along the plane of the rear of the phone.

Imagine I am standing long the plane of the front of a building, am I also standing along the plan of the rear of a building? Am I looking at the building at a flat 90 (whatever that means)?

Comment: Re:Possible to store encrypted email? (Score 1) 187

by praxis (#47921123) Attached to: Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

Even better would be a system such as:

You generate a key pair, give Apple the public key. You manage your own private key.

Then, for each email:

Apple receives the email as plain text from another server (likely via SSL), encrypts it with your public key and stores it on their servers. When you connect to retrieve your mail they send you the encrypted blob that you decrypt via your private key.

Problems are this: first, Apple has a plain text copy of each email you receive and could be asked (nicely or forcefully) to record this somewhere before proceeding with encryption and storage. Second, replies are not encrypted.

Much better for users to manage their own keys and use S/MIME. That's what I do with my friends and Google (my email provider) never sees unencrypted messages from me to any of my friends and vice versa.

Comment: Re:Inaccurate (Score 1) 187

by praxis (#47921053) Attached to: Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

Tim Cook says they "don't" read your email and "can't" read your iMessages. So presumably, they CAN read emails but choose not to do so.

Which makes sense as most email clients out in the wild don't encrypt messages, so even if Apple were to encrypt messages stored on the server, they'd be doing it with *their* key, not the users (unless the user used S/MIME or PGP or GPG or what have you). If they want to interoperate with other email providers, they need access to the emails as that's how email works.

Comment: Re:False Headline (Score 2) 187

by praxis (#47921031) Attached to: Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

iMessage and FaceTime are technologies Apple designed and implemented, and they chose to do it in a different way than e-mail. E-mail uses a plain text protocol and is stored in plain text. While the transport can be encrypted, if one were to encrypt the data on the server it was stored on, one would use a symmetric key, and one would have access to that key. iMessage and FaceTime can be implemented using asymmetric keys and one would not need access to those keys. It makes sense if you as a company want to minimize how much data you hand over to a government: you let devices generate keys that your servers never see.

Comment: Re:Microsoft can now kill Java (Score 1) 324

by praxis (#47918151) Attached to: Microsoft To Buy Minecraft Maker Mojang For $2.5 Billion

> Java runs on far more platforms than just Windows and OS X. If Microsoft ports Minecraft away from Java, what are they chances that they support those platforms?

Depends on what you mean by "run". Does it mean "runs well"? "Runs fast"? "Runs, but only on one very specific version of Java?" It's not the 1990s any more. Java's cross-platform capabilities are not the advantage they used to be.

I mean runs sufficiently to play Minecraft. It does so on many distributions of Linux out-of-the-box. That's more than just Windows and OS X. Java runs to other degrees on other platforms as well, but for the topic at hand (Minecraft's future), Linux distributions are what I'm referring to here.

Comment: Re:I wonder (Score 1) 352

by praxis (#47910859) Attached to: Microsoft Killing Off Windows Phone Brand Name In Favor of Just Windows

On that basis you could argue that a formula 1 racecar would be a good car to do the weekly shopping in, just because it has a steering wheel, an engine, and 4 wheels, just like every other car.

There's a difference between "racecar" (a word connoting a car with a specific purpose: racing) and "car" (a word connoting a general concept with a steering wheel, an engine, and 4 wheels). The word "laptop" is generic (like "car"). Your definition of "laptop" (a portable machine with a price point under X per performance Y running Microsoft Windows): that's much more specific than the general usage of "laptop", more akin to "racecar".

Comment: Re:911 was down for us Friday night (Score 1) 607

> how can you download software patches

When you want to, when you have cleared some space and you're ready. Just like you should be able to choose when to download anything, and how to use your disk drive space.

I recommend turning the option to download all music back to it's default setting: OFF. That way you can have control over the music downloads just like you have control over patches.

Comment: Re:I wonder (Score 1) 352

by praxis (#47909951) Attached to: Microsoft Killing Off Windows Phone Brand Name In Favor of Just Windows

Of course I know what a macBook is. Thanks to it being waaay overpriced and having relatively dismal hardware specs, and also being locked into a proprietary Apple universe, I practically don't even consider it a laptop at all, let alone anything I would actually want to give money for.

Language is funny in that it's a shared method of communicating. If you want to redefine laptop to mean "laptop with a utility to price ratio over X" (however you measure utility) then you should probably say that as when you say "you can't buy a laptop without it", it's quite misleading to most readers that don't share that view.

Comment: Re:KIlling off the Microsoft Store Name Too (Score 1) 352

by praxis (#47909925) Attached to: Microsoft Killing Off Windows Phone Brand Name In Favor of Just Windows

But why shouldn't Microsoft adopt those things? Apple has shown that they work. And Microsoft wanted to create a different environment than the other stores selling their products are offering.

Exactly! I don't disagree. The thread then devolved by a misunderstanding by AC "Because selling software in an online market place is clearly all invented by Apple". The entire topic has been retail stores, not online App Stores. Then ormico chimed in with "Because Apple invented selling products in physical stores?"

Ormico: they did not invent it but they did improve it. Revenue per square meter is a good metric of that. It makes sense to study what it is that they did to achieve that and have other business learn from it.

Comment: Re:Microsoft can now kill Java (Score 2) 324

by praxis (#47909433) Attached to: Microsoft To Buy Minecraft Maker Mojang For $2.5 Billion

Last I knew, Microsoft was still the second largest developer of software for Mac (after Apple, of course). There's always hope in that direction *if* there's a market for it.

Java runs on far more platforms than just Windows and OS X. If Microsoft ports Minecraft away from Java, what are they chances that they support those platforms?

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