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Comment Re:Who wants 'em? (Score 1) 224

They are also nice for when the medium in which you are communicating the URL doesn't support hyperlinks... such as the printed word. Much easier to have someone type a bitly url (esp. if you give it a nice short name) than some longer url. The longer the URL the easier it is to make a mistake keying it in.


Submission + - Your Input Needed (

p_squiddy writes: the Rabid Penguin is starting a campaign called "Free Ontario" to attempt to get F/LOSS noticed by all politicians in the Province of Ontario (Canada, eh?). Your help is needed to get this off the ground! In fact, without you, this is going nowhere fast. Anyone who wants to take part is welcome to join the discussion and get things moving. Ontario is just the starting point. If that goes well, maybe Linus' prediction can be made true for 2010...

Submission + - Ontario pulls subliminal gambling machines

davecb writes: "Gambling machines made by a particular vendor have been pulled from Ontario casinos: it turns out that instead of a random sequence of cards shown before the (hopefully!) random result, every machine displays a 5-card maximum jackpot for just long enough to be recognizable.

Does this remind you, perhaps, of voting machines made by a certain video-gambling-machine vendor?"

Submission + - Website targets Ontario's 'deadbeat' parents

An anonymous reader writes: The Ontario government launched a new website today shining a spotlight on deadbeat parents in hopes of making them pay their court-ordered family support. In announcing the initiative last month, the government said the website would be another tool to help the Family Responsibility Office track down irresponsible parents. The initial launching of the website — — displays pictures of 18 deadbeat dads, with their vital statistics and last known locations. The site allows people to submit information about deadbeat parents anonymously to the Family Responsibility Office. The office has almost 188,000 active cases, with each one remaining open for an average of 12 years.
Article from the Toronto Star

Nothing is finished until the paperwork is done.