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+ - The Tyranny of the Clouds->

Submitted by porkrind
porkrind (314254) writes "Cloud computing is a way for the technology "empire" to strike back at smaller end users and developers, taking away the rights and freedoms we won via the establishment of Open Source ecosystems. That they're using the very open source tools we helped create just makes it that much more painful. Now that we know that open source was never about innovation, what leverage do we have to bring about the open cloud? And what is the best way to project the four freedoms onto the cloud?"
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+ - Do Open Source Communities Have a Social Responsibility?->

Submitted by porkrind
porkrind (314254) writes "Given its roots in the GNU project, free software and the four freedoms, Open Source has always had an element of social advocacy and the betterment of humankind. Should open source communities be expected to bear some responsibility for related causes? Our communities have traditionally advocated for social issues like information rights, but what about things like gender and racial equality in high tech? Given that the hippies were right about freedom all along, maybe it's time to take their cue on other issues, as well, eg. the Ada Initiative and other efforts to address under-represented minorities in the tech industry."
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+ - It Was Never About Innovation->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The secret to open source innovation, and the reason for its triumphal success, has nothing to do with the desire to innovate. It's because of the four freedoms and the level playing field (and agility) that was the end result. It's like Douglas Adams' definition of flying. You don't try to fly, you throw yourself at the ground and miss.

It was never about innovation — it was always about freedom."

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Government

Congresswoman and Staff Gunned Down 2166

Posted by Soulskill
from the rest-in-peace dept.
tkprit writes "What a shame that a Congresswoman makes herself available to her constituents and she and six of her staff were gunned down for the effort. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona was shot, along with members of her staff, for trying to hear the concerns of the people she represents." CNN reports that at least 12 people were shot by the gunman. According to NPR, "The suspect ran off and was tackled by a bystander. He was taken into custody. Witnesses described him as in his late teens or early 20s." Update: 01/08 20:07 GMT by S : Other sources are reporting she's still in surgery, and early reports have been amended to list Congresswoman Giffords in critical condition.

+ - 10 Years Gone: The VA Linux Systems IPO-> 3

Submitted by porkrind
porkrind (314254) writes "This is a restrospective to mark the 10th anniversary of what has remained the biggest IPO of all time — in terms of largest first day gain. It looks at the legacy of VA and puts the IPO day in context. I tried to capture just how surreal the whole thing felt. I felt then, and feel now, that VA was on the cusp of something really great, but just... couldn't... get... there. Read the post here."
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Software

+ - Whither Initiative?->

Submitted by
porkrind
porkrind writes "In light of recent events, it's time to re-examine the role of the Open Source Initiative. The current Open Source leadership is simply too inflexible, rigid and incapable of taking in new information. The result is what I describe as an echo chamber-induced myopia. [insert Bush comparisons here] In this article, I advocate moving away from the OSI and creating a new system of governance based on the Creative Commons model."
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Moon

NASA Plans to Smash Spacecraft into the Moon 176

Posted by samzenpus
from the hit-it-hard dept.
djasbestos writes "NASA is planning to smash a spacecraft into the Moon in order to look for hydrogen deposits in the poles. More notably, it will impact with significantly greater force (100x, per the article) than previous Moon collisions, such as by the Lunar Prospector and Smart-1 probes. Admiral Ackbar was unreachable for comment as to the exact location and size of the Moon's thermal exhaust port."
Security

Physicist Calculates Trajectory of Tiger At SF Zoo 713

Posted by kdawson
from the parabolic-stripes dept.
KentuckyFC writes "Is it really possible for a 350-pound tiger to leap a 12.5-foot barrier from 33 feet away? (Said another way: a 159-kg tiger, a 3.8 m barrier, and 10 m away.) A physicist at Northeastern University has done the math, a straightforward problem in ballistics, and the answer turns out to be yes (abstract on the physics arXiv). But I guess we already knew that following the death of Carlos Souza at the paws of Tatiana, a Siberian Tiger he had allegedly been taunting at San Francisco zoo at the end of last year."

Comment: Top Questions from Bytesfree.org (Score 1) 916

by porkrind (#22053318) Attached to: Ask the Presidential Candidates
These are the questions I've submitted myself, previously, and received no response:

1. Do people have a right to access their (legitimately procured) information, including all multimedia content and documents?

2. How will you reform the DMCA?

3. Is there a link between the digital divide and the lack of information rights? If so, what do you intend to do about it?

4. Do you intend to pass an online customer bill of rights? For an idea of what this would entail, see http://www.bytesfree.org/wiki/index.php/Bill_of_Rights

5. And finally, will you tell all of the RIAA and MPAA lobbyists to get bent?
Security

The 5 Coolest Hacks of '07 145

Posted by samzenpus
from the still-no-pencil-hack dept.
ancientribe writes "Nothing was sacred to hackers in '07 — not cars, not truckers, and not even the stock exchange. Dark Reading reviews five hacks that went after everyday things we take for granted even more than our PC's — our car navigation system, a trucker's freight, WiFi connections, iPhone, and (gulp) the electronic financial trading systems that record our stock purchases and other online transactions."
Google

+ - Is Google's Success an "Enigma"?->

Submitted by
porkrind
porkrind writes "Nick Carr, of 'Does IT Matter?' fame, has penned an article asking the question whether Google is a model for other companies to emulate or whether it's too much of an anomaly to be useful in a cross-industry sense. He also asks the question of whether Google's approach to management and innovation (much ballyhooed in many circles) is a cause or result of its success. The answer to whether your company should emulate Google is, perhaps unsurprisingly, "it depends." His analysis and logic leading to that conclusion are definitely a thought-provoking read. His ultimate conclusion is that Google's success is much more attributable to its leading-edge IT operations than any of the hype you may read about in glossy journals."
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Google

+ - The Google Enigma->

Submitted by
porkrind
porkrind writes "Nick Carr, of 'Does IT Matter?' fame, has penned an article asking the question of whether Google is a model for other companies to emulate or whether it's too much of an anomaly to be useful in a cross-industry sense. He also asks the question of whether Google's approach to management and innovation (much ballyhooed in many circles) is a cause or result of its success. The answer to whether your company should emulate Google is, perhaps unsurprisingly, "it depends." His analysis and logic leading to that conclusion are definitely a thought-provoking read. His ultimate conclusion is that Google's success is much more attributable to its leading-edge IT operations than any of the hype you may read about in glossy journals."
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Operating Systems

NetBSD 4.0 Has Been Released 121

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the so-long-and-thanks-for-all-the-stacks dept.
ci4 writes to tell us that NetBSD 4.0 has been released and has been dedicated to the memory of Jun-Ichiro "itojun" Hagino. "Itojun was a member of the KAME project, which provided IPv6 and IPsec support; he was also a member of the NetBSD core team (the technical management for the project), and one of the Security Officers. Due to Itojun's efforts, NetBSD was the first open source operating system with a production ready IPv6 networking stack, which was included in the base system before many people knew what IPv6 was. We are grateful to have known and worked with Itojun, and we know that he will be missed. This release is therefore dedicated, with thanks, to his memory."
Red Hat Software

+ - Red Hat to Create Open Source Sys Mgmt Platform->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The Red Hat Network (RHN) and the JBoss Operations Network (JON) have been significant players for the Red Hat service model for a long time, but the software that has been behind them has been private and sourced from a different code base. Today, Red Hat announced with open source systems management vendor, Hyperic, that they will be working together "on the development of a common systems management platform. Development will continue under an open source model."

The involvement with Hyperic is rooted in the JON history as it was OEMed to create this service in 2005. This new open source project is meant to create a repository of common services to be used in future versions of all Red Hat products and adopted into Hyperic products as well, clearing up the mystery on the fate of these two networks. "Both companies will work to maintain, govern and extend management capabilities within the new open source systems management platform project. Additionally, Hyperic and Red Hat will work jointly to include this base in both future Hyperic and Red Hat systems management products." The project will be made available under the GPL."

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Businesses

+ - The Hows vs. the Whys?->

Submitted by
porkrind
porkrind writes "What sorts of personality traits do you look for when you hire employees in IT? Or do you feel that judging a potential new hire on personality is ethically wrong? This blog post suggests a system that looks for 2 archetypes to fill IT roles: the "hows" who only focus on 'making it go' with whatever they've been given and the "whys" who question every methodology and are responsible for building new stuff, which the "hows" will then deploy. TFBP implies that these traits can be detected in an interview process, even though all of them may possess very similar resumes. Is this even possible? Or is "hows" vs "whys" a false dichotomy?"
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