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Comment: Perhaps several years ago... (Score 1) 60

These days phone chips have TDPs running around 8-10W, like Exynos 5250's 8W max TDP. If you look at perf/watt at the top end, Intel's chips are still very securely in the lead.

Yeah, the ARM chips can still clock down way lower, but throwing around numbers like 0.2W max is just being disingenuous.

Comment: Standards? (Score 2) 76

by Vainglorious Coward (#47731853) Attached to: Apple CarPlay Rollout Delayed By Some Carmakers

Imagine a world where there were multiple standards for cigarette lighter^W^W accessory power connectors, and how different the market for accessories would be. Im surprised that car manufacturers, whose product development cycle is quite lengthy, are willing to accomodate proprietary (and likely fleeting) technologies.

Comment: Is "tyrant" now the opposite of "activist"? (Score 3, Insightful) 353

"Tyrant judge"?! He was applying the law. A bad law in the opinion of many people, sure, but nonetheless crystal clear in its scope and effect. Are you saying the judge should have not applied the law? That he should have ignored the statute and made up his own rules? You're in favor of "activist judges"?

+ - Tesla Has To Sell 6 Million Electric Cars To Make History

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy (2660665) writes "Many entrepreneurs have tried to start car companies in the U.S. over the past century, but the last person to do so successfully from the ground up was Walter P. Chrysler in 1924. To say this feat is monumental would clearly be an understatement. That isn't to say many haven't tried. Those who have include Preston Tucker, Henrik Fisker, Malcolm Bricklin, and even John Delorean. Now it's Elon Musk's time with Tesla. But what will it take for Musk and Tesla to be successful? The answer is the sale of at least six million electric cars. That's what it'll take to make history. Henry J. Kaiser's car company Kaiser-Frazer (later Kaiser Motors) produced a staggering 750,000 vehicles in its nine year run. Times have changed, back in 1955 when Kaiser closed up shop, only 11 million vehicles were sold globally, where as last year 83 million vehicles were sold globally. To equal the scale of Kaiser's achievement Tesla will have to sell at least 6 million vehicles. While not impossible, it gives an idea of the challenge facing any automotive entrepreneur."

Comment: Re:Raise the Price (Score 1) 462

by ciroknight (#47080525) Attached to: Fiat Chrysler CEO: Please Don't Buy Our Electric Car
How is it that every time someone talks about electric cars cost, they always neglect the sales incentives - federal tax credits, state tax credits, etc. No, they just go by raw numbers, which are intentionally set where they are to maximize the company's profits in light of said credits existing. Remove those from the price, and the Fiat 500e is roughly $3k more expensive than the regular 500, which shouldn't surprise you since that's about the difference an electric power train costs. Rerun your math and you find it's far easier to break even.

Comment: Difficulty Spectrum (Score 4, Insightful) 294

by Mr_Blank (#47030927) Attached to: Fixing the Pain of Programming

Programming has a spectrum of difficulty. The tools can always be improved to make the easier parts easier and the harder parts more manageable, but in the end the hard parts are hard because of the nature of the work; not due to lack of tools.

In more mature fields the spectrum of difficulty is well understood and no one expects the hard parts to be easy. If a person can write a "hello world" program then it should not be expected they will have the wherewithal to roll out healthcare.gov. If a person can apply a bandage to a skinned knee then it should not be expected they will have the wherewithal to do brain surgery; regardless of how good the tools are.

Comment: The mangled version is in the original (Score 1) 52

by Vainglorious Coward (#46051117) Attached to: Snapchat Account Registration CAPTCHA Defeated
Note also that the hypnosec didn't "write" this submission - like the vast majority of submitters s/he simply copy& pasted the first two paragraphs from the fine article. In other words, both submitter and slashdot admin either didn't read it, or have terrible reading comprehension skills. Probably both.

Comment: Common Carrier (Score 1) 170

by Mr_Blank (#45859967) Attached to: Facebook Being Sued Over Mining of Private Messages

The brave new world is sorting out what companies, services, and communication mediums are subject to Common Carrier regulations. If Facebook is a common carrier, then there should be some expectation of privacy. If not, then not.

Facebook (and many service providers) are currently and deliberately in a gray zone. If they are not common carriers then they can do whatever they please with the goods (electrons, bits) that they transport because it is their own private property once you hand it to them; per the terms of service. That is good for business because people are handing over "free" stuff that the companies can turn into profits.

However, if companies are not common carriers and they own whatever is handed to them then they are subject to intellectual property violations, libel suits, fourth amendment oddities, and other violation of the law. A telephone company is not criminally prosecuted when land lines are used to break laws; a common carrier is immune to prosecution for what is transmitted. The lawsuits resulting from not being a common carrier could be bad for business.

In the long run, the market could sort this out. If some companies clearly are common carriers and some are not then consumers can decide. Or, it can stay muddled long enough for the gray area to become its own class according to judicial precedent, law, and the public.

He's dead, Jim.

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