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Comment: The Dead Who Do Not Vote (Score 1) 609

by Mr_Blank (#49726497) Attached to: The Demographic Future of America's Political Parties

Here is an article from The Society Pages about dead people who won't vote:

Black people in the U.S. vote overwhelmingly Democratic. They also have, compared to Whites, much higher rates of infant mortality and lower life expectancy. Since dead people have lower rates of voting, that higher mortality rate might affect who gets elected. What would happen if Blacks and Whites had equal rates of staying alive?

These articles are interesting, but the conclusions are too simple: It is too simple to say that if things were different then people would act as if things were the same.

+ - Automakers to gearheads: Stop repairing cars->

Submitted by Mr_Blank
Mr_Blank writes: Automakers are supporting provisions in copyright law that could prohibit home mechanics and car enthusiasts from repairing and modifying their own vehicles. In comments filed with a federal agency that will determine whether tinkering with a car constitutes a copyright violation, OEMs and their main lobbying organization say cars have become too complex and dangerous for consumers and third parties to handle. The dispute arises from a section of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that no one thought could apply to vehicles when it was signed into law in 1998. But now, in an era where cars are rolling computing platforms, the U.S. Copyright Office is examining whether provisions of the law that protect intellectual property should prohibit people from modifying and tuning their cars.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:The (in)justice system (Score 2) 291

by Mr_Blank (#48842915) Attached to: Innocent Adults Are Easy To Convince They Committed a Serious Crime

It isn't about making money, it is about a case load that they could not possibly handle if they had to take every one to court. ... Besides, the court system couldn't deal with the volume either.

If there are more broken laws than there is money or capacity to adjudicate the cases of the alleged perpetrators... then maybe there are too many laws?

Why should justice hinge on the financial means of the alleged perpetrators or on court capacity? That scenario sounds ripe for the proliferation of injustice.

Comment: No, I really don't need to get a hackintosh. (Score 1) 229

by ciroknight (#48147099) Attached to: The Subtle Developer Exodus From the Mac App Store
> You really need to get a hackintosh

No I don't. I either need Apple to get its head out of its ass, or to vote with my dollars and buy something I'd actually use. Going out of my way to support Apple's OS, which they barely support on their own hardware, and to circumvent their random SMC half-assed secure boot nonsense is doing extra work that I don't need to be doing.

But even still, Apple's never going to learn that lesson because Apple doesn't sell PCs anymore. They sell shitty appliances that break and go out of date every year, because they know you'll just keep coming back to them for more.

Comment: Perhaps several years ago... (Score 1) 60

These days phone chips have TDPs running around 8-10W, like Exynos 5250's 8W max TDP. If you look at perf/watt at the top end, Intel's chips are still very securely in the lead.

Yeah, the ARM chips can still clock down way lower, but throwing around numbers like 0.2W max is just being disingenuous.

Comment: Standards? (Score 2) 76

by Vainglorious Coward (#47731853) Attached to: Apple CarPlay Rollout Delayed By Some Carmakers

Imagine a world where there were multiple standards for cigarette lighter^W^W accessory power connectors, and how different the market for accessories would be. Im surprised that car manufacturers, whose product development cycle is quite lengthy, are willing to accomodate proprietary (and likely fleeting) technologies.

Comment: Is "tyrant" now the opposite of "activist"? (Score 3, Insightful) 353

"Tyrant judge"?! He was applying the law. A bad law in the opinion of many people, sure, but nonetheless crystal clear in its scope and effect. Are you saying the judge should have not applied the law? That he should have ignored the statute and made up his own rules? You're in favor of "activist judges"?

+ - Tesla Has To Sell 6 Million Electric Cars To Make History

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy writes: Many entrepreneurs have tried to start car companies in the U.S. over the past century, but the last person to do so successfully from the ground up was Walter P. Chrysler in 1924. To say this feat is monumental would clearly be an understatement. That isn't to say many haven't tried. Those who have include Preston Tucker, Henrik Fisker, Malcolm Bricklin, and even John Delorean. Now it's Elon Musk's time with Tesla. But what will it take for Musk and Tesla to be successful? The answer is the sale of at least six million electric cars. That's what it'll take to make history. Henry J. Kaiser's car company Kaiser-Frazer (later Kaiser Motors) produced a staggering 750,000 vehicles in its nine year run. Times have changed, back in 1955 when Kaiser closed up shop, only 11 million vehicles were sold globally, where as last year 83 million vehicles were sold globally. To equal the scale of Kaiser's achievement Tesla will have to sell at least 6 million vehicles. While not impossible, it gives an idea of the challenge facing any automotive entrepreneur.

Comment: Re:Raise the Price (Score 1) 462

by ciroknight (#47080525) Attached to: Fiat Chrysler CEO: Please Don't Buy Our Electric Car
How is it that every time someone talks about electric cars cost, they always neglect the sales incentives - federal tax credits, state tax credits, etc. No, they just go by raw numbers, which are intentionally set where they are to maximize the company's profits in light of said credits existing. Remove those from the price, and the Fiat 500e is roughly $3k more expensive than the regular 500, which shouldn't surprise you since that's about the difference an electric power train costs. Rerun your math and you find it's far easier to break even.

Comment: Difficulty Spectrum (Score 4, Insightful) 294

by Mr_Blank (#47030927) Attached to: Fixing the Pain of Programming

Programming has a spectrum of difficulty. The tools can always be improved to make the easier parts easier and the harder parts more manageable, but in the end the hard parts are hard because of the nature of the work; not due to lack of tools.

In more mature fields the spectrum of difficulty is well understood and no one expects the hard parts to be easy. If a person can write a "hello world" program then it should not be expected they will have the wherewithal to roll out healthcare.gov. If a person can apply a bandage to a skinned knee then it should not be expected they will have the wherewithal to do brain surgery; regardless of how good the tools are.

Always draw your curves, then plot your reading.

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