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Comment: Accumulate Naturally? (Score 1) 59

by plastiqueman (#36899720) Attached to: X-rays For Stargazing Turn Into Cancer Treatment

As a PhD candidate who works with noble metal nanoparticles on a daily basis, I have some issues with their work.

1. How do they plan to get the particles to "naturally" accumulate in tumors without some sort of surface coating; specifically one incorporating some sort of tumor sensing molecule?

2. If the nanoparticle is coated with some other molecule, do they still expect "low-energy" electrons to punch through without trouble? How low is "low-energy" anyway? In my experience, when dodecanethiol is attached to a nanoparticle surface (which is very common as a generic molecule for the synthesis work) 200 KeV electrons have no problem punching through, but this coating is much less transparent to a 40-80 KeV electron beam.

3. How well do these particles absorb x-rays anyway? The surface plasmon resonance peak (i.e. the wavelength of EM radiation that it preferentially absorbs) typically occurs in the 300-800 nm range for these (noble metal) nanoparticles. If there isn't a great absorption peak here, how much adjacent tissue are we cooking?

It just seems preliminary to elevate this to "treatment" status when the article really doesn't do much to inspire confidence in the work.

Security

+ - OBL Scam Marks Shift In Mac As Malware Target->

Submitted by
CWmike
CWmike writes "Scammers are distributing fake security software aimed at the Mac by taking advantage of the news that al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden has been killed by U.S. forces, a security researcher said on Monday. A security firm that specializes in Mac software called the move 'a very big step forward' for malware makers targeting Apple's users. This is the first time scammers have targeted the Mac with a sophisticated, professional-looking 'rogueware' security application, said Peter James, a spokesman for Intego. On Monday, Intego published a detailed advisory about MAC Defender, noting that that it was 'very well designed, and looks professional.'"
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AMD

+ - AMD Llano's IGP will be branded Radeon HD 6550 (Ru->

Submitted by kingkaos69
kingkaos69 (1977596) writes "The top part, AMD A8-3550 features a quad core CPU and a Radeon HD 6550 GPU with a TDP of 100W. The GPU features 400 SP with a clock speed of 594 MHz. Its 400 SP will offer vastly superior GPU performance even compared to Intel's top HD 3000 12 EU graphics. However, Sandy Bridge is expected to lead in CPU benchmarks."
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Cloud

+ - VMware causes 2nd outage while recovering from 1st->

Submitted by
jbrodkin
jbrodkin writes "VMware's new Cloud Foundry service was online for just two weeks when it suffered its first outage, caused by a power failure. Things got really interesting the next day, when a VMware employee accidentally caused a second, more serious outage while a VMware team was writing up a plan of action to recover from future power loss incidents. An inadvertent press of a key on a keyboard led to "a full outage of the network infrastructure [that] took out all load balancers, routers, and firewalls ... and resulted in a complete external loss of connectivity to Cloud Foundry." Clearly, human error is still a major factor in cloud networks."
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Google

+ - Google wants your voice data->

Submitted by 00_NOP
00_NOP (559413) writes "Peter Norvig, Google's director of research, has told New Scientist that one of the reasons the search engine launched Google Voice is that it needs more human voice data to perfect the sort of "big data, simple algorithm" probabilistic approach to translating voices to text that drives Google Translate. Norvig says that no one is listening to your calls on Google Voice — it is simply their servers trying to the translation right."
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Security

+ - OS X Crimeware Kit Emerges->

Submitted by Trailrunner7
Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "Crimeware kits have become a ubiquitous part of the malware scene in the last few years, but they have mainly been confined to the Windows platform. Now, reports are surfacing that the first such kit targeting Apple's Mac OS X operating system has appeared.

The kit is being compared to the Zeus kit, which has been one of the more popular and pervasive crimeware kits for several years now. A report by CSIS, a Danish security firm, said that the OS X kit uses a template that's quite similar to the Zeus construction and has the ability to steal forms from Firefox."

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IT

+ - Homemade Sound Proofing 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "I've just moved into a new apartment which is oddly attached to a neighboring tenant by a door in the middle if my living room wall. Normally that wouldn't be too bad, since the door is locked from both sides by key, but my new neighbor seems to have his tv pressed against the door allowing me to hear every detail of Survivor last night amongst his conversations to his roommates. What is the best way to soundproof a room? I'm hoping for something a little better than egg cartons on the ceiling or covering my new place's walls in drab sheeting."
PlayStation (Games)

+ - Sony Battens Down the Hatches, Hiring CISO->

Submitted by wiredmikey
wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Following a cyber attack that resulted in the personal information of more than 75 Million PlayStation Network and Qriocity customers falling into the hands of hackers, Sony shut off access to the PlayStation Network and Qriocity services while it conducted an extensive audit of its systems with the assistance of multiple information security firms in an attempt to determine the extent and details of the breach that occurred at the company’s data-center located in San Diego, California.

Sony has also been heavily criticized over the length of time it took to identify the extent of the breach and make the appropriate adjustments. Industry experts criticized Sony’s information security practices, saying the entertainment giant should have had the capabilities to easily look through its logs to identify sessions that occurred when data exposure occurred. Because the PlayStation Network stores credit card data, it must comply with PCI standards and have log management tools in place, but the company wasn’t able to quickly make use of the collected data in a reasonable timeframe, critics say.

As you would assume, many of these vendors are looking to sell their security solutions and are more likely to be more vocal about what tools breach victims should have in place, but the bottom line is that a company that houses massive amounts of data containing the personal information of its customers should be better prepared to respond to such incidents. Letting users sit and wonder for almost a week is unacceptable."

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Censorship

Internet Blacklist Back In Congress 278

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the nobody-talks-about-my-orange-list dept.
Adrian Lopez writes "A bill giving the government the power to shut down Web sites that host materials that infringe copyright is making its way quietly through the lame-duck session of Congress, raising the ire of free-speech groups and prompting a group of academics to lobby against the effort. The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) was introduced in Congress this fall by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT). It would grant the federal government the power to block access to any Web domain that is found to host copyrighted material without permission."
Youtube

YouTube Gets a Vuvuzela Button (Seriously) 305

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the just-stop-watching-sports dept.
teh31337one writes "YouTube always has had a way with pranks. Some time in the last hour, the world's largest video portal activated a new button on some videos that looks like a tiny soccer ball. Clicking it will activate an endless, incredibly annoying sound that sounds vaguely like a swarm of insects. Or, for anyone who has been watching the World Cup, like the dreaded vuvuzela — an instrument commonly played in South Africa at football (soccer) games. South Africa is, of course, the host country for this year's World Cup, and fans watching the games have been subjected to the vuvuzela's mindless drone for hours on end. The noise is so annoying that television networks have taken measures to filter it out, and guides have popped up showing viewers how to block it from their TV sets and computers. I'm not seeing the button show up on all videos, but it is definitely appearing on some clips that aren't soccer-related."
Canada

Might Shatner Boldly Lead Canada As Governor? 318

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the universal-healthcare-and-captain-kirk dept.
just fiddling around writes "Now that Michaëlle Jean is approaching the end of her customary five-year post as Governor General of Canada, the rumor mill has started on who Prime Minister Steven Harper will propose to the Queen in her stead. According to the CBC, the short list includes Captain Kirk, actor William Shatner. It seems that acting can lead to the highest offices in places other than California."
Moon

Japanese Consortium Projects a Humanoid Robot On the Moon By 2015 151

Posted by timothy
from the why-can't-they-send-them-all? dept.
JoshuaInNippon writes "A Japanese manufacturing cooperative named Astro-Technology SOHLA announced on April 27th that they are planning to create and send a two-legged humanoid robot to the moon, have it draw the Japanese flag on the surface, and hopefully then get it to return to the Earth, all by the year 2015. The group wants to inspire people, particularly in Japan, about space and generate confidence among SMEs to create low-cost space technology. While the idea may seem far-fetched to some, SOHLA had success in building a small low-cost satellite named Maido-1, which was launched into space aboard a Japanese H-IIA rocket in early 2009. The group also commented that they want to have their future humanoid robot hitch a ride to the moon with a surveying rover that JAXA is building."

Comment: Re:This is why i love noscript and requestpolicy (Score 5, Informative) 245

by plastiqueman (#32003302) Attached to: Fake Antivirus Peddlers Outpacing Real AV Firms
I work for an IT helpdesk at a large public university and we see students come through all the time with these programs. Realistically though, the installation vector we see the most is not the installation of programs from random websites; the majority get them from clicking a link to watch a movie (still in theaters) online or even through certain ads in Facebook. These programs have simply gotten extremely clever at tricking the end user.

Your fault -- core dumped

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