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Comment: Re:Safety vs Law (Score 2) 467

by pixelpusher220 (#47705993) Attached to: Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

Increase the speed limits? Then there will be idiots driving even faster.

Yes there will. Simply changing the rules without adequate training after decades of an undesirable behavior isn't going to change said behavior overnight.

Trying to change a systemic behavior in a system as vast and (in the US) as untrained as the driving public isn't a small undertaking.

Comment: Re:Left or Right? (Score 2) 467

by pixelpusher220 (#47705929) Attached to: Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit
there's this thing called 'software' that can, amazingly enough, use different configuration data based on a physical location. Or did you think Google Search was only in American English everywhere?

That said, this magical thing called 'software' can also be hacked to do things that aren't intended by the developers so it's not a panacea, but it will still be a far bit better than humans at following the rules of the road as conveyed to it - even through the normal posted speed limit signs.

Comment: Re:So I'm confused... (Score 3, Interesting) 69

by pixelpusher220 (#47703463) Attached to: Iceland's Seismic Activity: A Repeat Show for Atmospheric Ash?
the major threat to Iceland is the flooding. Sure its airspace will be affected but if you're house is being washed away that's a significantly more pressing and dangerous issue.

Europe on the other hand is at no risk from the flooding. So the threat to air travel in Europe, based on the 2010 experience, is significant.

Add to that the factor that European air travel is probably orders of magnitude greater than Iceland's...

Comment: Re:And this is the same for copyrights. (Score 1) 239

by pixelpusher220 (#47658319) Attached to: Patents That Kill
Your pension wasn't created the day before you died and then pays out for 10 years afterwards. It was created over 20-30 years with the money you already earned (you get paid a bit less so the pension is funded).

And just like you, the author's works can provide for his family after death, assuming he's been investing his money into retirement/life insurance. But a one hit wonder who kicks the bucket the next day? That 'pension' is going to be might small...

Comment: Re:And this is the same for copyrights. (Score 1) 239

by pixelpusher220 (#47658291) Attached to: Patents That Kill
Then the 'author' should have bought life insurance or he was a lousy author and we aren't in the business of rewarding that. Copyright isn't about paying for relatives, it's about incentivizing the creator to create more works by giving a reasonable return. If you're dead you can't produce any more so there's no incentive that can work.

fringe cases like this are the bastion of trolls.

Comment: Re:And this is the same for copyrights. (Score 2) 239

by pixelpusher220 (#47658263) Attached to: Patents That Kill
You know what industry thrives on rampant copying and 'intellectual' 'theft'? Fashion. No copyrights, no patents and it's a veritable bonanza of creativity. And of course knock offs that look almost as good as the originals. Knock offs which actually drive more purchases of the originals. People can purchase a knock off today and later when they have the ability, they still want the brand name.

So, no, you don't need copyright to have robust creativity and rewards for that creativity.

Comment: Re:And this is the same for copyrights. (Score 1) 239

by pixelpusher220 (#47658103) Attached to: Patents That Kill
sometimes the person who invents something and patents it, simply isn't able to properly take it to the next level. It would seem unfair to prevent them from selling their patent to a company and thus receiving compensation for their 'invention', no?

Obviously, some companies will be your patent trolls, but others do take their purchased patents and market them. There isn't any 'best' solution for this because stopping one too much causes the other to be affected too.

Comment: Re:And this is the same for copyrights. (Score 1) 239

by pixelpusher220 (#47657993) Attached to: Patents That Kill
you've already missed the point. If copyright/patents are meant to encourage people to create, granting them rights after they are dead is utterly useless.

40 years is also way way way to long. 10 would be a lot more reasonable. If you can't monetize your work in that amount, maybe you aren't that good at what you're doing. Besides, for music, people are still going to see the original artist play their music, not a cover band given the choice.

Comment: Re:what Snowden has done is like... (Score 1) 254

I'm not missing the forest through the trees. He is in Russia specifically because the US revoked his passport. The OP called that blatantly false and you agree that it's blatantly true.

Could Russia do something to 'unstick' the situation? Sure, but that's entirely a different. The current situation was created because of the US; that Russia could do something to resolve it isn't Snowden's fault nor does it change the fact that the US started this.

Comment: Re:what Snowden has done is like... (Score 1) 254

The OP blatantly said that it was false that Snowden was in Russia because of the US. Yet you agree with me that, yes the reason Snowden got stuck in Russia was the US's fault.

COULD Russia issue him a passport? I find that perhaps possible but very unlikely, but that's sort of irrelevant to how and why he got stuck there - which you agree was the US's doing.

Comment: Re:what Snowden has done is like... (Score 1) 254

seriously do read up on how things happened. Snowden got stuck in the Moscow airport expressly because his passport was no longer valid. Countries don't just let people in on flights without one of those. He had already booked flights to Central America but couldn't board the flights without a valid passport.

And most countries check you BEFORE you board so that you aren't able to actually get there without it.

So yes, the State Dept revoking Snowden's passport is exactly why he was living in the Moscow airport for a short time until Russia decided to grant him asylum; I'd guess for no small reason that Russia is downright reveling in sticking it to the US by doing so.

But if you think countries go around issuing their national passports to just anybody...I'm not sure we can have rational discussion.

Comment: Re:what Snowden has done is like... (Score 1) 254

He's only in Russia BECAUSE of the US. He didn't choose to stay there. Restore his passport and he'll quite happily leave Russia.

And he's not 'lending aid' to any foreign governments. Nobody has any proof of that. Which also supports his case that he didn't do this for 'espionage' or to 'harm' the US. The US Government is already harming itself, he just told us about it.

Comment: Re:what Snowden has done is like... (Score 4, Informative) 254

actually, no he wouldn't get a fair trial. He's not allowed to present much of what would be his case. Motive is a perfectly reasonable thing to enter into the record. Except he won't be allowed to do so. Even Daniel Ellsberg of the Pentagon Papers thinks so.

If you think nobody cares if you're alive, try missing a couple of car payments. -- Earl Wilson

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