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Comment Re:This is *SO* unethical ! (Score 1) 241

Clauses in legally binding agreements that grant one party the ability to unilaterally change the terms of those agreements are illegal in most places where the rule of law has any meaning. That's one of the reasons almost every contractual agreement, of which EULAs are one kind, have a clause that says if any of the terms are illegal they are void.

Comment Re:unpossible software hack? (Score 1, Insightful) 241

If you give them enough money, they'll do whatever you want. The question is only of the relative cost. Getting something custom done in open source is sometimes a matter of asking and waiting, or of paying a developer to do it for you. Getting something done in closed source might be a matter of filing a request under your support agreement, or it might mean a very expensive contract.

Submission + - Privacy Vulnerability Exposes VPN Users' Real IP Addresses (

An anonymous reader writes: A major security flaw which reveals VPN users’ real IP addresses has been discovered by Perfect Privacy (PP). The researchers suggest that the problem affects all VPN protocols, including IPSec, PPTP and OpenVPN. The technique involves a port-forwarding tactic whereby a hacker using the same VPN as its victim can forward traffic through a certain port, which exposes the unsuspecting user’s IP address. This issue persists even if the victim has disabled port forwarding. PP discovered that five out of nine prominent VPN providers that offer port forwarding were vulnerable to the attack.

Submission + - NASA concludes that comets, not alien megastructures orbit KIC 8462852 ( 1

MarkWhittington writes: Back in October, findings from the Kepler Space Telescope suggested that something strange was going on around a star called KIC 8462852. Kepler was built to detect exoplanets by measuring the cycles of dimming light from other stars, indicating that a large object was passing between them and Earth. But the dimming light cycle from KIC 8462852 seemed to suggest a lot of smaller objects swarming around it. Scientists narrowed down the explanations to either a swarm of comets or alien megastructures. NASA announced evidence garnered by two other telescopes that pointed to the comet explanation.

Submission + - Erasing Our Messages From Other People's Inboxes Is A Rocky Road (

An anonymous reader writes: Viber is the latest communications app to offer the facility to erase content that we sent to other people from the recipient's inbox, whether they like it or not. But unlike similar functionality in Line and WeChat, there are no time restrictions imposed, and users can erase old messages from all inboxes at will. 'Unsending' a message is the dream of anyone who ever forgot to BCC properly. But while we are keen to protect our communications from government interference, do we not perhaps have some responsibility to history as well?

Submission + - Research Claims Li-Fi Is 100 Times Faster Than Conventional Wi-Fi (

An anonymous reader writes: Research from an Estonian startup claims that Li-Fi, which uses light to transmit data, can operate at 100 times the speed of conventional Wi-Fi connectivity. In laboratory conditions speeds of up to 224 gigabytes per second were recorded, with the added security benefit that the data stops exactly where walls stop the light.

Submission + - 900 Embedded Devices Share Hard-Coded Certs, SSH Host Keys

An anonymous reader writes: Embedded devices of some 50 manufacturers has been found sharing the same hard-coded X.509 certificates (for HTTPS) and SSH host keys, a fact that can be exploited by a remote, unauthenticated attacker to carry out impersonation, man-in-the-middle, or passive decryption attacks. SEC Consult has analyzed firmware images of more than 4000 embedded devices of over 70 vendors — firmware of routers, IP cameras, VoIP phones, modems, etc. — and found that, in some cases, there are nearly half a million devices on the web using the same certificate.

Submission + - Free Pascal Compiler 3.0.0 is out, adds support for 16 bit MS-DOS and 64 bit iOS ( 1

Halo1 writes: Twenty-three years ago, development started on the first version of the Turbo Pascal and later also Delphi-compatible Free Pascal Compiler, for OS/2 no less. Two decades and change later, the new Free Pascal Compiler 3.0.0 release still supports OS/2, along with a host of older and newer platforms ranging from MS-DOS on an 8086 to the latest Linux and iOS running on AArch64. On the language front, the new features include support for type helpers, codepage-aware strings and a utility to automatically generate JNI bridges for Pascal code. In the mean time, development on the next versions continues, with support for generic functions, an optional LLVM code generator backend and full support for ISO and Extended Pascal progressing well.

Submission + - Google scours 1.2 million URLs to conform with EU's Right to be forgotten (

An anonymous reader writes: According to a Google report the company has evaluated 1,234,092 URLs from 348,085 requests since the EU's May 2014 "right to be forgotten" ruling, and has removed 42% of those URLs. Engadget reports: "To show how it comes to its decisions, the company shared some of the requests it received and its decisions. For example: a private citizen that was convicted of a serious crime, but had that conviction overturned during appeal, had search results about the crime removed. Meanwhile a high ranking public official in Hungary failed to get the results squelched of a decades-old criminal conviction. Of course, that doesn't mean the system is perfect and the company has already been accused of making mistakes."

Submission + - Mozilla's 2014 Annual Report: 90% Of Revenue Came From Google And Yahoo

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla has released its annual financial report for 2014, and how the company's reliance on Google is finally ending: Revenue increased less than 5 percent, 90 percent of which came from Google and Yahoo. Every November, Mozilla releases its financial report for the previous year, but the 2014 version is a particularly complex one.

The hardest part of climbing the ladder of success is getting through the crowd at the bottom.