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Comment: Re:Am I missing something? (Score 1) 233

by pierreboulez (#43518949) Attached to: Physicist Proposes New Way To Think About Intelligence

I grew up right next to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. My dad and the vast majority of my friends moms and dads worked there for a long time as physicists. Being around these people for 35 years has taught me something. They are morons.

Interesting and probably true but nothing more than an ad hominem attack with regard to this study.

Comment: Re:Which side of your mouth will you use? (Score 1) 306

by pierreboulez (#43404533) Attached to: Fox, Univision May Go Subscription To Stop Aereo
In your analogy, Netflix is the retransmitter. And yes, Netflix pays content providers like CBS for the right to retransmit. So by your logic, Aereo should pay content providers just like Netflix does.

Thank you for supporting my argument. Or is that not what you were trying to do?

Comment: Aereo is retransmitting (Score 1) 306

by pierreboulez (#43403483) Attached to: Fox, Univision May Go Subscription To Stop Aereo
Now that I think about it, I'm surprised Aereo won that ruling. Sure, every consumer has the right to receive a broadcast signal on an antenna and record it for time shifting purposes, and ostensibly with Aereo you simply outsource those functions to them. But there's a crucial difference: Aereo is not located on your premise; it's remote. That means in order for the signal to reach you, Aereo must transmit it from the remote DVR to your premises. I mean, isn't that a re-transmission by definition? And if so, is Aereo legally entitled to retransmit without compensating the original provider of the signal?

Probably not a popular opinion here on Slashdot, but legally speaking I'm surprised Aereo won. Of course, IANAL and all that.
Data Storage

ZFS Hits an Important Milestone, Version 0.6.1 Released 99

Posted by samzenpus
from the brand-new dept.
sfcrazy writes "ZFS on Linux has reached what Brian Behlendorf calls an important milestone with the official 0.6.1 release. Version 0.6.1 not only brings the usual bug fixes but also introduces a new property called 'snapdev.' Brian explains, 'The snapdev property was introduced to control the visibility of zvol snapshot devices and may be set to either visible or hidden. When set to hidden, which is the default, zvol snapshot devices will not be created under /dev/. To gain access to these devices the property must be set to visible. This behavior is analogous to the existing snapdir property.'"

Comment: Naivete (Score 1, Flamebait) 425

by pierreboulez (#42717625) Attached to: Iran Says It Sent Monkey Into Space and Back

The guy lives so much more humbly that its hard to think if he is as crazy as western media shows him or is there more going on. The country is making progress in spite of all the sanctions. Not sure if its the Iranian media spin but the guy sits and eats simple foods on a mat on the floor, sleeps on the floor.

First of all, Ahmadinejad is not the real face of Iranian leadership. The ayatollahs make policy, not him.

Second, to the extent that he does influences Iran's behavior, what does Ahmadinejad's eating habits have to do with his policy goals? Is it OK that he wants to wipe Israel off the map and long as he gets lots of fiber in his diet?

Comment: Plug-compatible (Score 1) 471

by pierreboulez (#42362345) Attached to: Apple Kills a Kickstarter Project - Updated
Remember when Amdahl made computers that were "plug-compatible" with IBM mainframes? As I recall, any Amdahl component was a drop-in replacement for the equivalent IBM component.

What the hell has happened to patent laws (or corporate patent strategies?) that you can't even build a damn power connector without running afoul of some licensing issue? I agree with the parent: no patents on connectors! How does it "promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts" if nobody can independently build a device to connect to yours?

Comment: Re:Really? Woz? (Score 1) 333

by pierreboulez (#42007139) Attached to: Woz Worries Microsoft Is Now More Innovative Than Apple

The "Photo" app only lets you see ones your Pictures folder (Library->Pictures). I've got games and apps that don't happen to use that as the default directory. As a result, I need to copy or move all my pics into this ONE place that is usable, or hunt them down in the explorer for desktop mode, then double click (causes a "flip" to metro mode) to view each one. This blows chunks and my compromise (for now) is to enable the small preview mode (lower right toggle).

Pictures is a library, not a folder. Libraries were introduced in Windows 7. A library lets you join multiple distinct folders, even across drives and network shares, into a single logical entity. For what you are trying to accomplish, you should add your game and app folders which contain pictures to your Pictures library. In Windows 7 you do this pulling up the properties for the Pictures library and using the "Include a folder..." button.

After you've done that, the Photo app should should all of your pictures.

Beer

Beer Is Cheaper In the US Than Anywhere Else In the World 633

Posted by timothy
from the beat-the-high-cost-of-living-and-die dept.
derekmead writes "It's frustrating to drop $7 on a pint of beer in New York City, as it turns out, Americans have the cheapest beer on Earth. International bank UBS gathered data about the median wages and average retail prices of a 500mL (pint) beer in 150 countries. Those data were compiled to figure out how many minutes of work it takes the average worker of a country to earn enough money to buy a beer. It's funny that UBS analysts are spending time looking at beer, but considering that beer is beloved and nigh essential everywhere, it offers an interesting comparison between commodities and wages. For example, India tops the least, with the median worker having to work nearly an hour to afford a pint thanks to extremely low wages. In the U.S. however, where wages are relatively high and the cost of the average beer is quite low (thanks to those super-massive macrobreweries out there), it takes the median worker about five minutes of labor to afford a retail (store-, not bar-bought) pint. That's the shortest amount of time in the world, which means that, relatively speaking, beer is cheaper here than anywhere else." OK, UBS: Now please repeat the research with coffee.

Comment: Fertility rate (Score 2) 585

by pierreboulez (#41115693) Attached to: Iran Universities To Ban Women From 77 Fields of Study
Read How Civilizations Die: (And Why Islam Is Dying Too) by David P. Goldman for the reason behind this.

In all societies, fertility rates have a very strong inverse proportional relationship to women's educational level. The fertility rate in Iran is crashing - which I wasn't aware of until reading Goldman. It has fallen below replacement level; the population is aging and will be heavy with old people and the cost of supporting them in the coming decades. Ahmadinejad has been exhorting families to have more children to no avail. The next logical step is to enforce a lesser level of education for women.

Bottom line: keep the women dumb and they'll have more babies. History prove this to be true.

Comment: Polo shirts (Score 1) 432

by pierreboulez (#40844419) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is There a Professional Geek Dress Code?
Depends on the corporate culture. Definitely wear polo shirts or similar collared shirts; no T-shirts. In some places IT middle management wears jeans; in others it's Dockers or similar khakis. I've been a contractor for a few years, formerly in IT management, and I've seen this dress in many, many places.
Java

After Learning Java Syntax, What Next? 293

Posted by timothy
from the nice-hot-bath dept.
Niris writes "I'm currently taking a course called Advanced Java Programming, which is using the text book Absolute Java, 4th edition, by Walter Savitch. As I work at night as a security guard in the middle of nowhere, I've had enough time to read through the entire course part of the book, finish all eleven chapter quizzes, and do all of the assignments within a month, so all that's left is a group assignment that won't be ready until late April. I'm trying to figure out what else to read that's Java related aside from the usual 'This is how to create a tree. This is recursion. This is how to implement an interface and make an anonymous object,' and wanted to see what Slashdotters have to suggest. So far I'm looking at reading Beginning Algorithms, by Simon Harris and James Ross."

For large values of one, one equals two, for small values of two.

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