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+ - ESA Summer of Code->

Submitted by phyr
phyr (586855) writes "ESA Summer of Code in Space (SOCIS) is a program run by the European Space Agency. It aims at offering student developers stipends to write code for various space-related open source software projects. Through SOCIS, accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor or mentors from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios. In turn, the participating projects are able to more easily identify and bring in new developers. Applicants must be attending a European or Canadian university and will receive 4000 Euros for supporting one of the accepted open source projects. Applicants have until May 15th to submit their proposals and resumes. I'm particularly interested to have exceptional proposals for the NEST project."
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+ - ESA Summer of Code Needs Student Developers->

Submitted by phyr
phyr (586855) writes "We're looking for student developers. The turn out for this years summer of code in space is very poor.
ESA's Summer of Code in Space is modeled after Google's summer of code where students are paid for participating in the development of open source projects.
You need to be a student currently enrolled at a university in an ESA member state (Most of Europe and Canada). ESA will pay students 4000 Euros for completing a project before the end of October. Check out the NEST ideas page for a list of priority projects or propose your own.
The following projects have had none or little responses: NEST, Gerbil, NS-3, Octave, Stellarium, ICML, CoolFluid3, Pocket Mission Control, PyBRML, AstroPy, KStarts.
Go to ESA SOCIS and apply today! The deadline is Aug 4th."

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+ - ESA Summer of Code In Space Application Deadline 1

Submitted by joelsherrill
joelsherrill (132624) writes "August 8 is the deadline for students to apply to participate in the European Space Agency's Summer of Code In Space (http://sophia.estec.esa.int/socis2013/). This is a great opportunity to contribute to the use of free and open source software in the space community and get paid. Eligible students should look through the list of software projects participating (http://sophia.estec.esa.int/socis2013/?q=node/13) and see what interests them.

As the organization administrator for the RTEMS Project (http://www.rtems.org), I am honored to be participating again and can't wait to see what students propose."

+ - ESA Summer of Code in Space 2012->

Submitted by
phyr
phyr writes "The European Space Agency is looking for student coders to join the Summer of Code in Space. ESA will pay 4000 Euros to each student for contributing to a space related open source project for the summer. Accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios. Mentor organizations have been selected. Students now have until July 27 to submit their applications. Check out the ideas pages of each project such as for the NEST SAR Toolbox"
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Math

'Inexact' Chips Save Power By Fudging the Math 325

Posted by Soulskill
from the for-sufficiently-large-values-of-1 dept.
Barence writes "Computer scientists have unveiled a computer chip that turns traditional thinking about mathematical accuracy on its head by fudging calculations. The concept works by allowing processing components — such as hardware for adding and multiplying numbers — to make a few mistakes, which means they are not working as hard, and so use less power and get through tasks more quickly. The Rice University researchers say prototypes are 15 times more efficient and could be used in some applications without having a negative effect."
Earth

New Study Suggests Wind Farms Can Cause Climate Change 384

Posted by samzenpus
from the stirring-things-up dept.
nachiketas writes "A study led by Liming Zhou, Research Associate Professor at the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences at the University of New York concludes that large wind farms could noticeably impact local weather patterns. According to Professor Zhou: 'While converting wind's kinetic energy into electricity, wind turbines modify surface-atmosphere exchanges and transfer of energy, momentum, mass and moisture within the atmosphere. These changes, if spatially large enough, might have noticeable impacts on local to regional weather and climate.'"
Entertainment

HDTV Expert Alfred Poor Tells You What to Buy and What Not to Buy (Video) 324

Posted by Roblimo
from the there's-no-such-thing-as-a-TV-that's-too-big dept.
Alfred Poor's website is called HDTV Almanac. That's where he talks about the latest HDTV industry news and changes. He also writes about HDTVs and monitors for a variety of industry publications and does some marketing consulting for manufacturers in the field. In this 17 minute video, Alfred tells us what features we should look for in our next TV buy and which ones aren't worth spending extra money on. He also says that for a variety of non-technical reasons, you might want to consider buying your next TV between now and June -- and says you should think about getting a 3D TV even if there aren't many 3D TV shows you want to watch right now.
NASA

X-37B Space Plane Marks One Year In Space 75

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the retrofitted-with-lasers dept.
S810 writes with an excerpt from an article on the X-37B in at Discovery News: "The military won't say what it has been doing with its experimental miniature space shuttle, but the pilotless spaceship, known as the X-37B, has been in orbit for a year now. The 29-foot robotic spacecraft, also known as the Orbital Test Vehicle, or OTV, was launched on March 5, 2011, on a follow-up flight to extend capabilities demonstrated by a sister ship during a 244-day debut mission in 2010. 'We are very pleased with the results of ongoing X-37B experiments,' Tom McIntyre, with the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office..."

Comment: Re:Not exactly new (Score 1) 70

by phyr (#38226814) Attached to: UK Plans Space Based Radar System
What's new here is that they are trying to get a constellation up very cheap (20M) and expect to get a 50:1 return on investment.
The sensors themselves aren't that impressive and low resolution when compared to RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X and CosmoSkymed.

Let's hope they fund some new work into the GPL SAR Toolbox NEST http://www.array.ca/nest
Earth

When Did Irene Stop Being a Hurricane? 426

Posted by timothy
from the anything-with-cliff-mass-is-interesting dept.
jamesl writes "Cliff Mass, a climate researcher at the University of Washington and popular Seattle blogger, asks, 'When did Irene stop being a hurricane? ... there is really no reliable evidence of hurricane-force winds at any time the storm was approaching North Carolina or moving up the East Coast. ... I took a look at all the observations over Virgina, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York. Not one National Weather Service or FAA observation location, not one buoy observations, none reach the requisite wind speed. Most were not even close. ... Surely, one of the observations upwind of landfall, over Cape Hatteras or one of the other barrier island locations, indicated hurricane-force sustained winds? Amazingly, the answer is still no.' Cliff supports his statement with data from NOAA/NWS/NDBC presented in easy to understand charts."

All constants are variables.

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