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Comment: Post Mortem Missed the Problem (Score 1) 135

by photonrider (#31405894) Attached to: When the Power Goes Out At Google
I read the post-mortem and I think they completely missed the mark. Power failed to some machines. They only noticed because "...traffic has problems..." They should have been monitoring the power to detect this situation. They didn't say whether they have the data center power supply on a UPS or not. If it was, it was dying and no one noticed. If they had been monitoring the power they might have avoided the whole mess.

Comment: Article misses the Big Clue (Score 0, Troll) 1100

by photonrider (#29200161) Attached to: Global Warming To Be Put On Trial?
It won't be a business organization arguing against scientists, or religion vs science as in Scopes, this will be science vs science. Green environmental whacko supporting scientists against rational scientists. The summary tries to make it sound like this is a "settled" matter with scientific "consensus" whereas the opposite is true. All the scientists who support the concept of global warming agree of course, as does the liberal mouth organ media and politicians. There is an equal consensus on the other side which believe there is no global warming phenomenon or immediate danger to humans as the other side has contended. As it is the evidence against global warming is mounting, so much so that the zealots have had to rename their cause as "Climate Change". The whole episode of global warming is laughable.

Comment: It's about Business, not Security (Score 1) 98

by photonrider (#29042797) Attached to: How Much Does a Reputation For Security Matter Anymore?
There was a story quite awhile back comparing two companies who suffered judgments in court. One company had followed all the rules and provided the archived emails/documents the prosecution wanted. They were found guilty and fined $200 million. The other company had no document retention policy, no archived emails and could not produce anything the prosecution wanted. They were scolded and fined $20 million. Which was the best business decision with regard to document retention policies? Not a perfect example nor applicable in all situations but it illustrates the business decision. This is a similar business issue. Do you spend a lot of money and man power on security? Or since the public memory is so short and the leading edge of the wave is well past it becomes just another page 5 story for most occurences. Just the few biggies make the front page and that is soon forgotten as well. When the business says the amount of attention and impact a breach would receive is small compared to the cost to protect against it, the game is pretty much over, move along. If it doesn't contribute to or protect the bottom line in a fairly direct fashion 99% of the time it won't get done. The other 1% of the time it's a law or regulation of some sort that forces action.
Moon

New Radar Maps of Moon 70

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the stay-on-target dept.
SpaceAdmiral writes to mention that NASA has some new high-resolution radar maps of the Moon obtained by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The new images have also been used to create a simulation of the Moon's day and a movie of a Moon landing from the point of view of the astronaut. "NASA is eying the Moon's south polar region as a possible site for future outposts. The location has many advantages; for one thing, there is evidence of water frozen in deep dark south polar craters. Water can be split into oxygen to breathe and hydrogen to burn as rocket fuel--or astronauts could simply drink it. Planners are also looking for 'peaks of eternal light.' Tall polar mountains where the sun never sets might be a good place for a solar power station."
The Military

Ask the Air Force Cyber Command General About War in Cyberspace 315

Posted by Roblimo
from the play-the-ultimate-MMORPG dept.
We ran an article about the new Air Force Cyber Command and its recruiting efforts on February 13, 2008. Now Major General William Lord, who is in charge of this effort, has agreed to answer Slashdot users' questions. If you're thinking about joining up -- or just curious -- this is a golden opportunity to learn how our military is changing its command structure and recruiting efforts to deal with "cyberspace as a warfighting domain." Usual Slashdot interview rules apply.

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

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