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Submission + - When Functional Programming Makes Sense (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Unless you've been living under a rock, you know functional programming languages rank among the hottest languages used by so-called alpha geeks, writes Andrew Oliver. While this brave new world is upon us, and before we take things too far, it might be a good time to pause and reflect on the appropriateness of functional programming for everyday application development. 'Functional programming addresses the concurrency problem of state but often at a cost of human readability. Functional programmming may be entirely appropriate for many circumstances. Ironically, it might even help bring computer and human languages closer together indirectly through defining domain-specific languages. But its difficult syntax makes it an extremely poor fit for general-purpose application programming. Don't jump on this bandwagon just yet — especially for risk-averse projects.'"

Submission + - Church files complaint against online blogger. (jacksonville.com)

Scr3wFace writes: "After a church filed a complaint about a blog, a police detective — who also is a member of the pastor's security detail — opened an investigation. The detective got a subpoena from the State Attorney's Office requiring Google Inc. to provide information about whoever was behind the site. Names, addresses, etc. It's important to note that the blog never threatened violence. Was it harshly critical? Sarcastic? Unfair? That's a matter of opinion. But it never threatened violence. And the detective closed the investigation, finding no criminal wrongdoing.He also provided the church, his church, the identity of the blogger. The church then issued a trespass warning against Thomas A. Rich and his wife. Most chilling about all of this: Those in power — from the police to the church leaders — not only defend this chain of events, they say it's how things should work. The Sheriff's Office says there wasn't a conflict of interest and that the detective did the right thing by passing along the blogger's identity to the church. The State Attorney's Office says there wasn't anything unusual about the subpoena, which made it possible to figure out who was tapping away at a computer keyboard. Happens all the time. Not just with blogs. With e-mails, text messages, etc. And I'm not sure what to make of one detail of the saga, other than perhaps the irony of it, but one form of communication that wasn't part of this investigation — face-to-face talking with the blogger. This isn't necessarily unusual, police say, especially considering that no criminal wrongdoing was found. But what if, as the blogger believes, the ultimate goal of this process wasn't to find wrongdoing but to find him? More details to this can be found here. http://fbcjaxwatchdog.blogspot.com/ http://www.newbbc.accura.net/FBCSubpoenas.pdf http://www.newbbc.accura.net/JSO-InvestRep-Sept29.pdf http://www.newbbc.accura.net/JSO-InvestRep-Nov13.pdf"

Submission + - Can Companies Really Afford Telepresence? (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Telepresence has been championed as a sustainable-minded practice that can cut down significantly on travel expenditures, but for many organizations the technology simply remains out of reach. High monthly costs, management, and room setup continue to deter companies from deploying telepresence, which if rolled out in earnest stands to cut down significantly on the overall carbon footprint of business. 'The initial setup costs of a telepresence system in two locations equals about 350 one-night trips per room over the lifetime of the telepresence rooms, and the monthly fees equal about 20 one-night trips per month,' InfoWorld reports. Put in other terms, a telepresence system must be used 25 percent of the business day to justify its investment, analysts contend. But interoperability may be the chief hurdle to realizing the environmental upsides of telepresence, as major vendors' appear to be moving slow to standardize their systems to be interoperable with one another, and with the kind of commodity components that will make telepresence affordable on a wide scale."

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