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Encryption

Phil Zimmermann's New App Protects Smartphones From Prying Ears 121

Posted by Soulskill
from the using-your-ears-to-pry-things-is-not-recommended dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Neal Ungerleider notes that cryptography pioneer and Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) creator Phil Zimmermann has launched a new startup that provides industrial-strength encryption for Android and iOS where users will have access to encrypted phone calls, emails, VoIP videoconferencing, SMS, and MMS. Text and multimedia messages are wiped from a phone's registry after a pre-determined amount of time, and communications within the network are allegedly completely secure. An 'off-shore' company with employees from many countries, Silent Circle's target market includes troops serving abroad, foreign businesspeople in countries known for surveillance of electronic communications, government employees, human rights activists, and foreign activists. For encryption tools, which are frequently used by dissidents living under repressive regimes and others with legitimate reasons to avoid government surveillance, the consequences of failed encryption can be deadly. 'Everyone has a solution [for security] inside your building and inside your network, but the big concern of the large multinational companies coming to us is when the employees are coming home from work, they're on their iPhone, Android, or iPad emailing and texting,' says Zimmermann. 'They're in a hotel in the Middle East. They're not using secure email. They're using Gmail to send PDFs.' Another high-profile encryption tool, Cryptocat, was at the center of controversy earlier this year after charges that Cryptocat had far too many structural flaws for safe use in a repressive environment."

Comment: So let me get this straight (Score 1) 330

by philofaqs (#40837159) Attached to: How Apple v. Samsung Was Explained To the Jury
If you have any technical nous at all, read tech sites or news paper reports, you can't be a juror on a case that requires the jury to understand tech stuff, really for this sort of case the law needs changing as it does for fraud cases which last years and the jury really don't have a clue. These tech lawsuits are getting out of hand, I believe judges can declare platiffs to be in contempt of court and bar them from further prosections.

Comment: Re:Oh Boeing... (Score 1) 403

by philofaqs (#40786547) Attached to: Flight 4590 Didn't Kill the Concorde; Costs Did
Really?? Well I lived in Reading 15 miles or so from Heathrow on its flightpath and Condorde pilots turned on the afterburners at Woodley about 4 miles before it got to us. It was incredibly loud - at 10:50 and 19:25 each day you just had to stop what you were doing for 3 minutes, buildings shook, car alarms went of - conversations were impossible. This never happened with other commercial jets. This wasn't just Boeing sh*t stirring. (Although they were a bit) Fortunately it didn't cause sonic booms for us. I was flying on my honeymoon when the Paris Corcorde crash happened, bit of a shock when I saw the news.

Comment: Wow troll much (Score 1) 423

by philofaqs (#40587111) Attached to: Internet Explorer Market Share Drops To Almost 15%
I know this is slashdot but to quote that site as representative? why not the FSF's to get a bit of balance? Or the Firefox developers'? Actually I'm shocked that 15% of their visitors do use IE given the antipathy to Microsoft. When Google's stats show something similar then that will be another matter.

Comment: Re:burglarized??? (Score 2) 99

by philofaqs (#40558027) Attached to: Dutch ISP Discovers 140,000 Customers With Default Password
Umm less standard? OK I'm English from England, we would never, ever say I've been burglarized, I've never even heard the word in 50 years on this planet before but Chambers says it's OK well actually not with the final D. Still I guess the verbification of a nounifiction etc is Ok on the intertubes.

The first Rotarian was the first man to call John the Baptist "Jack." -- H.L. Mencken

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