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Comment: Re:Too late (Score 1, Interesting) 270

by pevans (#42768865) Attached to: Oracle Responds To Java Security Critics With Massive 50 Flaw Patch Update

Just uninstall it everywhere.

Beginning a while back I began removing it from all the little SMBs I do work for. At first just a few with trepidation. Then the rest.

It turns out that exactly none of them needed it. None.

Who wants to pay for their employees to play Pogo games anyhow?

Sure, there may be enterprise sized outfits who rely on it, but I'm guessing most slashdotters aren't that well-monied with their clients and are more small-time as I am. Just uninstall it everywhere and save yourself one of the tedious, recurring headaches supporting windows boxes.

Ten boxes here, thirty there... and we can kill the thing and get it off our plate entirely.

Full disclosure: I've long hated java as a user suffering bloated start-up times and xplatform probs, as an IT drone endlessly updating it and for its sheer verbosity as a language (it's just way too much typing for me to bother with vs other langs).

Needless to say, I was very disappointed with the choice Google made with Android... :-(

+ - MS New Privacy Rules->

Submitted by pevans
pevans (44803) writes "Microsoft instituted a policy on Friday that gives the company broad leeway over how it gathers and uses personal information from consumers of its free, Web-based products like e-mail, search and instant messaging.

Almost no one noticed, however, even though Microsoft's policy changes are much the same as those that Google made to its privacy rules this year."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:You don't want "hosting" (Score 1) 225

by pevans (#39181629) Attached to: Suggestions For Music Hosting?

> but rather a VPS, dedicated server,

This.

I've been a long-time customer of NetNation -- OK, now it's Hostway and they've had a couple of power probs at my NOC that *never* happened before, but..

I have 4 Peta-Bytes of transfer every month and it costs less than 250USD/month for a dedicated server. Yes, that was peta with a capital 'P'. That's only with 100mb duplex, but you can pay a bit more for gigabyte speeds as they have lots of fibre. This is in the austin DC.

Buy one or two or more of those and stop worrying. After adding more than one, you'll need to do interesting balancing things, but at nowhere near the cost of what you are currently in store for.

Comment: Re:Yet another Canadian immigration scam ... (Score 1) 316

by pevans (#38722304) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Open Source vs Proprietary GIS Solution?

I don't log in much -- hardly ever in fact. Anyhow:

You (@rnmartinez) are (not to put too fine a point on it) acting like a septic-sucking scum bag. I just wasted an hour of my life researching your sorry ass. It's the first time I ever wished I had less google-fu.

I would really appreciate it if you'd just leave slashdot off your guppy list, because we aren't listening anymore and never will thanks to tom.

This would be a very good time for you to re-evaluate your goals in life.

Trying to avoid Hell clearly isn't at the top of your current agenda, but you might at least give it a passing thought.

Comment: Re:What momentum may that fork have? (Score 1) 198

by pevans (#33350666) Attached to: OpenSolaris Governing Board Dissolves Itself

One word: btrfs

All the posts here mostly talk about the wonders of zfs. I was enamored of zfs myself when it first came out.

Thing is, even if they got rid of the license problems, the thing is still not very linux kernel-friendly. The way it is, it will only ever exist in user-land/fuse. Yes, it can be made to work. So what?

Btrfs is better, uses zfs ideas and leaverages the linux kernel natively.

  http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Btrfs

+ - Running shoe generates electricity-> 1

Submitted by pevans
pevans (44803) writes "Yes, we've all seen similar things over the years using "ceramic transducers, which are hard and rigid" but this one uses a "a low-cost, polymer transducer, a soft, flexible material that replaces the shoe’s heel shock absorber without sacrificing user experience." I ran across this at http://inhabitat.com/2010/04/27/shoe-generator-harvests-power-from-walking/ first."
Link to Original Source

+ - BP Cofferdams Explained via Fishtank->

Submitted by wonkavader
wonkavader (605434) writes "The Guardian has a cute little video demonstration [http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/video/2010/may/06/cofferdams-bp-solution-deepwater-horizon] of what BP has in mind to stop the oil leaks which are creating the mess in the gulf of Mexico, which just recently made landfall [http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2010/spill_hits]. Apparently, BP has constructed a 180 ton plastic water bottle, then cut it in half and... well, the video makes things pretty clear."
Link to Original Source
Robotics

+ - Robot with knives used in robotics injury study->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "IEEE Spectrum reports that German researchers, seeking to find out what would happen if a robot handling a sharp tool accidentally struck a human, set out to perform a series of cutting, stabbing, and puncturing tests. They used a robotic manipulator arm, fitted with various sharp tools (kitchen knife, scalpel, screwdriver) and performed striking tests at a block of silicone, a pig leg, and at one point, even the arm of a human volunteer. Volunteer, really?! The story includes video of the tests."
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