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Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

Different AC here. ... P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think ... menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Although, to be fair to UX "professionals" there is no muscle memory so powerful that it cannot be compromised with sufficient alcohol. Still getting 80wpm tonight. But somehow missed the post-anon button. Sometimes the UX "professional" doesn't have to move the clickbox. It's moving on my system, though!

Comment Re:Teachers (Score 1) 240

My touch typist teacher said RIGHT. Never considered the left.

Different AC here. Basic non-ergo Keytronic layout. I use left hand, not right hand, and I was taught touch typing (and can still do 100wpm) by a teacher who taught by the book that says "right-handed."

Even though the "6" is, properly speaking, in the "6/y/h/n" vertical row that "belongs" to the right hand, I just looked closely at my fingers on the actual physical keyboard on which I've typed for 10+ years, and its clones on which I've typed for at least 20+, it's because the "6" is closer to the left index finger than the right index finger. The pad of my hand (not the wrist, about halfway up the pad beneath my pinky finger) rests on the lower edge of my keyboard, and my thumbs rest so comfortably on the spacebar that the spacebar has a little worn spot on it.

Home exercise: Place fingers on home row. Touch right and left index fingers to "T", "Y", and "R". For my fingers and keyboard, "Y" is the most comfortable, almost dead-center. Repeat experiment with "5/6/7". For my fingers/keyboard, I can't reach "5" with right. I can't reach "7" with left, and "6" is reachable with either, but more easily reached with left finger. with left on "T" and right on "y" almost centered beneath "6", left is visually confirmed closer to "6."

(Side note: Both by size of wear spot and by observation while typing this post, I almost exclusively press the space bar with my *right* thumb. Maybe that contributes to using my left idex to hit th 6 key -- my left thumb is basically unused. I just typed this entire sentence with my left thumb crammed under the keyboard and it felt comfortable. Undoable with right thumb in equivalent positon.)

P.S; Our touch-typing teachers taught us the same way, but for me and my keyboard, we cheat on the "6". I've forgotten whether it's supposed to matter which thumb you use on the space bar, although I imagine I could have squeezed out a couple of extra wpm if I'd used both thumbs in high school.

P.P.S.: Fuck the last 5 years of UX "professionals" who think everything has to change every six months for the hell of it, or the last 15 years who think that menu options should change depending on which options the software decides are more frequently used. Neither group knows anything of muscle memory because neither group has been in the industry long enough for it to matter.

Submission + - Malvertising ads infest websites with 100++ million visitors->

An anonymous reader writes: Angler exploit's SSL malvertising campaign source and details from MalwareBytes https://blog.malwarebytes.org/... infesting sites like:

weather.com 121M visits per month
drudgereport.com 61.8M visits per month
wunderground.com 49.9M visits per month
findagrave.com 6M visits per month
webmaila.juno.com 3.6M visits per month
my.netzero.net 3.2M visits per month
sltrib.com 1.8M visits per month

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Windows 10's Privacy Policy: the New Normal?->

An anonymous reader writes: The launch of Windows 10 brought a lot of users kicking and screaming to the "connected desktop." "This is very useful, but obviously has privacy implications: the online service providers can track which devices are making which requests, which devices are near which Wi-Fi networks, and feasibly might be able to track how devices move around. The service providers will all claim that the data is anonymized, and that no persistent tracking is performed... but it almost certainly could be." There are privacy concerns, particularly for default settings. According to Peter Bright, for better or worse this is the new normal for mainstream operating systems. We're going to have to either get used to it, or get used to fighting with settings to turn it all off. "The days of mainstream operating systems that don't integrate cloud services, that don't exploit machine learning and big data, that don't let developers know which features are used and what problems occur, are behind us, and they're not coming back. This may cost us some amount of privacy, but we'll tend to get something in return: software that can do more things and that works better."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Def Con: Hacker Shows How to "Kill" Anyone-> 1

wiredmikey writes: Hackers the Def Con gathering in Las Vegas on Friday got schooled in how to be online killers. A rush to go digital with the process of registering deaths has made it simple for maliciously minded folks to have someone who is alive declared dead by the authorities.

"This is a global problem," Australian computer security specialist Chris Rock said as he launched a presentation titled "I Will Kill You."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - No Immunity For Cops Who Sent A SWAT Team To A 68-Year-Old Woman's House->

An anonymous reader writes: Earlier this year, we covered the story of Louise Milan, a 68-year-old grandmother whose house was raided by a SWAT team (accompanied by a news crew) searching for someone who had made alleged threats against police officers over the internet. Part of the probable cause submitted for the warrant was Milan's IP address.

But the police made no attempt to verify whether any resident of Milan's house made the threats and ignored the fact that the IP address was linked to an open WiFi connection.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Please (Score 1) 371

Its like saying "Hey, Chevrolet, you know your customers like the radio station set to 101.9, why cant you engineer your cars to respect their choice instead of forcing your nefarious 101.5 agenda."

Yeah, but this is a Mozilla car analogy we're talking about here.

In the current 2015.7 model, release, the UX team has decided that a 5-button hamburger menu on an AM dial (and only from 1100Khz to 1150KHz in 10KHz increments) is all that's needed. Users who want to access a wider range of frequencies in the AM band are free to write an extension or purchase a third-party radio head unit.

To further improve the user experience, we remind prospective extension developers that in the Aurora channel for the 2016.1 model year, the about:config setting for frequency.megavskilohertz has been removed, along with the FM antenna. The UX team has made this recommendation based on telemetry that suggests that few drivers actually listen to FM radio, especially since the 2013.6 model, in which the AM/FM toggle switch was removed because the UX team for 2012.1 felt it was cluttering the dashboard.

Comment Re:Reasons I'm not a judge. (Score 2) 331

You need to correct behaviors and find out the underlying reasons WHY they are doing the things.

Except that parents have plenty of incentive not to find out, because it's their responsibility and probably their fault.

That only increases the urgency of finding out, if the person is really serious about being a parent. Children are supposed to have a life that's better than ours was; they are not supposed to inherit severe character flaws because we were too cowardly to deal with them.

I do agree, though, that there are lots of self-centered (and often emotionally immature) people who really do fit the description you gave. That something might be uncomfortable, or require some effort, or *gasp* involve admitting that they were wrong and need to change, these things are enough to stop such people from doing the right thing no matter how important it may be, no matter how lasting the consequences are. It's even harder to raise a child and help them become an adult when the parent is not really an adult themselves.

Comment Re:Undergrad only? (Score 4, Informative) 264

All of the numbers in this article are very believable.

I have a BS degree from the University of Nebraska. And not the prestigious Raikes school, but the normal old pre-Raikes degree program.

After a summer internship, I got an offer from McDonnel Douglas for 48k.

My offer from Microsoft was more like the 60k figure. I took that one, because it didn't involve living in St. Louis.

The year: 2000

So, 60k to start right out of college was a going rate for top-tier companies... fifteen years ago.

Some companies paid much more, and sometimes that was a company decision, and sometimes it was a reality of where the position was located. For instance, before I had even finished my degree, I was recruited for a position with a 99k starting salary. That firm, however, was in NYC. When you adjust for NYC cost of living, it's not such an eye-popping number.

Subsequent to these numbers from 15 years ago, I have been involved in lots of hiring at Microsoft in the years I've been here.

Starting salaries have adjusted upward significantly since I was hired.

If you can score an engineering position with a top software/services company like Microsoft, you will be paid exceptionally well. For someone fresh out of college, there is just an obscene amount of money on the table.

Different companies target different spots in the industry pay curve. Microsoft by no means targets the top of the salary scale, but neither do we target the bottom. At times, Microsoft has been seen as, to put it mildly, "pretty uncool". At times, there has been lots of startup money and equity available for top quality grads to go after.

In those time periods, Microsoft has to offer more money to continue to attract new talent.

If you want to work at a company where lots of people want to work (e.g. a games company, or SpaceX), those organizations don't have to compete as much with offer packages, since their brands have a high intrinsic draw.

While I don't know what a Netflix offer package is like, Netflix states that their policy is to pay very high wages - the wage they'd be willing to pay to keep someone excellent who wanted to leave.

Finally, it's important to consider the type of organization you're looking at joining. Do they do software/IT, or is that a cost of doing business for them? If a company is in the business of selling shoes, but has an unavoidable need for software engineers, they're going to treat software engineers as a cost of doing business.

If a company is in the business of building software, they're going to think differently about compensation and retention.

Finally, companies that aren't well established players in the software space can have difficulty making big offer packages. At times in my career, I've been frustrated and have looked elsewhere, and the smaller, less profitable companies I've spoken with are offering tens of thousands lower than what I was already making.... making the friction of leaving financially tremendous.

(my personal financial plan is to expect a 50% paycut when something happens to my MSFT employment)

In summary, I have no problem believing the numbers. Top quality CS people at top quality organizations are paid outrageously well.

However, I get that lots of people are expressing disbelief. Let's talk about why that may be. The survey data could be skewed by multiple factors:
- the locale of the person responding
- the self-selection bias of the person responding (e.g. are people happy with their comp more likely to fill out a survey?)
- the kind of organization the survey respondants work for...

If you surveyed internal apps developers at regional insurance offices, in the Midwest, you would get a different picture from a survey of facebook engineers...

Comment Re:They are trying to get off... (Score 1) 104

I cannot deny that much of what you've said about the mob is true. I didn't mean to say that the mob never did anything well, never provided benefits to neighborhoods or people, etc.

Everyone understands that the mob can "Get things done". And, what's ironic is that, IIRC, you and I have very different ideas about government, but we apparently agree that in some situations, the mob is more effective and occasionally preferable to local government.

That said, I think you are papering over the intimidation, violence, and property destruction done by the mob.

(I'm not papering over the intimidation, violence, and property destruction done by governments, fwiw)

Comment Re:They are trying to get off... (Score 4, Insightful) 104

Have you ever lived anywhere where there was a significant mob presence?

I haven't, and for good reason.

Your plan is a really great plan if you assume that the mob has absolutely no penetration whatsoever into the local police department.

I don't know why you'd assume such a stupid thing, though.

So here is how your suggestion really goes.

You walk into the local PD. On your way there, some kid recognized your face. He has instructions that say that if he sees a guy who looks like you walking into the police station, he calls a number and gets a bonus.

When you come home, something is different. Either your family is already dead, or, there's a note that makes it clear that your family is vulnerable and that you've fucked up - but there is still a chance to not get your family killed. Who knows what the knob is set at for the "first contact" - but there's a clear indication that you don't want to continue talking to the police.

Now, if someone inside that building is actually connected - and usually, somebody is - maybe they're the person who interviewed you. Maybe they're the person who looks at the signin/signout sheet at the station. Maybe they are somebody who files paperwork or types things up for other people.

Zillions of little people are needed to make the machine of government operate, and the mob targets precisely those people to be their eyes and ears. It uses combinations of carrots and sticks to keep them cooperating with mob goals, without letting them get too familiar with what those goals are or who is executing them.

Point is, if the mob has any power in your city, that includes eyes and ears within, or effectively within, the police department.

Part of the mob's effectiveness is that it destroys trust in the normal functioning institutinos of society. You never know for sure who is and isn't. It effectively isolate frightened individuals from the facets of society that might help or protect them. It always makes it seem like it's 1 person against the entire mob - it paints that same picture to lots of separate people.

Do you suffer painful illumination? -- Isaac Newton, "Optics"

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