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Cellphones

6 Million Virgin Mobile Users Vulnerable To Brute-Force Attacks 80

Posted by timothy
from the see-also-bank-of-france dept.
An anonymous reader writes "'If you are one of the six million Virgin subscribers, you are at the whim of anyone who doesn't like you.' The Hacker News describes how the username and password system used by Virgin Mobile to let users access their account information is inherently weak and open to abuse." Computerworld also describes the problem: essentially, hard-coded, brute-force guessable passwords, coupled with an inadequate mechanism for reacting to failed attempts to log on.
Microsoft

Microsoft Social Media Site Accidentally Revealed 134

Posted by Soulskill
from the keeping-up-with-the-googses dept.
BogenDorpher writes "Looks like Microsoft is trying to steal the spotlight from Google — a new social media site from the company was accidentally revealed. The site, branded 'Tulalip,' was not functional, and it was taken down shortly after its discovery. It appears to be a 'social search' service. Microsoft says it went live by accident, and was simply an 'internal design project.'"
Microsoft

Microsoft's SkyDrive Drops Silverlight 358

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the well-thats-not-good dept.
mikejuk writes "Microsoft's SkyDrive, a web service that provides cloud storage for end user files, has just acquired a revamped user interface — and it is HTML5 based. Yes, another Microsoft website has dropped Silverlight. How can Microsoft expect independent developers to base their future on Silverlight when Microsoft itself is abandoning it like a sinking ship? Whatever happened to 'eating your own dog food'? It seems that now Microsoft would rather eat dog food made elsewhere..."
Cloud

Dropbox Password Goof Let Any Password Work For 4 Hours 185

Posted by timothy
from the you'll-find-we're-very-open-minded. dept.
tekgoblin writes "Dropbox confirmed today that for some time yesterday, any user's account was accessible without a password. The glitch was a programming error related to a code update and accounts were only vulnerable from around 1:54 pm PST to 5:46pm PST." "Only" is relative; as reader zonky puts it, "It took around 4 hours from deployment for Dropbox to notice they'd entirely broken their authentication scheme."
Cellphones

Apple Camera Patent Lets External Transmitters Disable Features 268

Posted by Soulskill
from the say-cheese-only-in-specially-approved-picture-zones dept.
sticks_us writes with news of an Apple patent application, recently published by the USPTO, for an on-board camera system that would include circuitry for processing external infrared signals. The data received from these signals could then be used to present information to the user of the device, or even to modify the device's operation. "For example, an infrared emitter could be located in areas where picture or video capture is prohibited, and the emitter could generate infrared signals with encoded data that includes commands to disable the recording functions of devices. An electronic device could then receive the infrared signals, decode the data and temporarily disable the device's recording function based on the command. ... In some embodiments, a device may apply a watermark to detected images as an alternative to completely disabling a recording function."
Television

The Next Phase of Intelligent TVs Will Observe You 294

Posted by samzenpus
from the unseen-mechanized-eye dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Japan based NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories (STRL) is testing an interface which observes TV viewers, determines their interest and provides information related to the TV program in accordance with the way they are watching it. UTAN (user technology assisted navigation) TV viewing interface, as it is called, has a camera mounted on the TV which photographs the viewer and estimates the viewer's degrees of interest, concentration, etc. The information is processed by a tablet PC and recommended information is shown to the viewer. It is possible to show individual interests as well, in case there are multiple viewers."
Science

Activists Destroy Scientific GMO Experiment 1229

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-in-my-garden dept.
Freggy writes "In Belgium, a group of activists calling themselves the Field Liberation Movement has destroyed a field which was being used for a scientific experiment with genetically modified potatoes. In spite of the presence of 60 police officers protecting the field, activists succeeded pulling out the plants and sprayed insecticides over them, ruining the experiment. The goal of the experiment was to test potato plants which are genetically modified to be resistant to potato blight. It's a sad day for the freedom of scientific research."
Privacy

BBC Site Uses Cookies To Inform Visitors of Anti-Cookie Law 98

Posted by timothy
from the only-criminals-will-have-cookies dept.
Andy Smith writes "As of 26 May 2011 web sites in the UK must get a user's permission to set cookies. If you go to the BBC's commercial TV listings site Radio Times you'll see a message telling you about the new law. Go to the site again, though, and you don't see the message. How does the site know you've already seen it? By setting a cookie of course! It doesn't ask for permission."
Businesses

RadioShack Trying To Return To Its DIY Roots 413

Posted by timothy
from the ghost-of-christmas-past dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In what seems to be a desperate attempt to keep the company afloat, RadioShack has made a video appeal to the DIY community that helped the retail chain grow into what it is today. The days of amateur radio operators and tinkerers flocking to the store are long gone, but it seems that the company wants to issue a mea culpa and move forward."

Comment: Re:So, how long has the NSA had one? (Score 1) 189

by pestie (#36267342) Attached to: Lockheed Martin Purchases First Commercial Quantum Computer

OK, fair enough - I had forgotten about one-time pads. I really should have specified "all encryption based on multiplying two large primes," since that's the vast majority of commercially-significant encryption. I'm not even sure if there's a theoretical quantum attack on elliptic-curve algorithms or not.

Comment: So, how long has the NSA had one? (Score 3, Interesting) 189

by pestie (#36267216) Attached to: Lockheed Martin Purchases First Commercial Quantum Computer

So, can this thing crack all non-quantum encryption, then? I seem to remember reading about how that would only require 32 qubits or so. And whether it can or can't, if commercial offerings have come this far, how long has the NSA had a version that can crack all encryption?

Movies

CmdrTaco Visits Pixar 128

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the sometimes-my-job-rocks dept.
A couple of weeks ago I scored a visit to Lucasfilm and half jokingly challenged the Slashdot audience to invite me to other cool places. Two brave Pixar employees took me up on my offer and showed me around for Slashdot T-Shirts. It's an amazing campus. Thanks to Mark Harrison and Ralph Gootee for showing me "0% of the render-farm" and making me wish that I was talented enough to have a place in such an amazing world. Soon I'll have a cool story to post about the crazy work Mark is doing with mind boggling volumes of data, but for now I have a picture of me next to a giant Luxo Lamp. Also thanks to Heidi Parmelee who gave me a Woody doll to give to my son and made me a hero. So now the gauntlet has been doubly thrown: Who out there in Slashdot-land works somewhere super cool and can give me a tour in exchange for a T-Shirt?
Firefox

Mozilla Labs: the URL Bar Has To Go 591

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the command-line-strikes-back dept.
An anonymous reader writes with an editorial from ConceivableTech "Since Google's move to enable users to hide the URL bar, we have seen what could be the beginning of the end of one of the key features of the web browser. Mozilla has its own thoughts, but there is little doubt that Mozilla is reconsidering the purpose of the URL bar in future versions of its browsers. In a Mozilla Labs post today, David Regev suggests that the location bar should be replaced with a tool to support more than just one command."
Music

Ask Jonathan Coulton About the Transformation From Code Monkey to Internet Star 122

Posted by samzenpus
from the isn't-it-enough-to-know-that-I-ruined-a-pony-making-a-gift-for-you? dept.
Even though he created the definitive guide to enjoying yourself outside, Jonathan Coulton is best known for the programmer anthem Code Monkey, his Thing a Week project, and writing the theme song to Portal. In 2005 Coulton left his programming job to pursue his music career, and has since become a successful one man music label. Jonathan has agreed to answer your questions about robots, life, and internet stardom. Normal Slashdot interview rules apply.
OS X

Apple Support Forums Suggest Malware Explosion 455

Posted by Soulskill
from the macpocalypse-is-nigh dept.
dotwhynot writes "According to ZDNet, the volume of in-the-wild malware reports on discussions.apple.com is truly exceptional. With the launch of the first malware DIY kit for OS X earlier this month, and now this, has the malware industry threat finally caught up with the growth of Apple, and what do Mac users need to do?"

I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the demigodic party. -- Dennis Ritchie

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