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Privacy

+ - "I've got nothing to hide"

Submitted by
perlhacker14
perlhacker14 writes "Recently, I was referred to a paper on the arguement "I've got nothing to hide". People often state that when questioned on government surveilence and data mining. This paper tries to define privacy and notes how it has been redefined over time and turned in to the shambled state it is in today. It shows how a simple arguement like "I've got nothing to hide" has its faults and can be used for information and invasiveness of privacy. The issue at question is not the government trying to tap our phones, but our acceptance and will to assist, through "I've got nothing to hide". I encourage you to read through (or skim, long as it is) this paper and reflect on the current state of things. If by the arguement, there is naught to conceal (therefore no threat to privacy) as long as all is legal, and if there is illegal activity there is no expectation of privacy, is our privacy intact?"
Programming

+ - Does your employer mandate legacy programming?

Submitted by
perlhacker14
perlhacker14 writes "My company is mandating that all developers now function as legacy programmers in our spare time, as well as application developers (our regular roles). Is this normal in other companies: Do other developers (working on the main product of the company) also function as legacy programmers, maintaining older versions? If any of you have experienced this dual role, how much extra work is it to work on two major projects and maintain facets of older programs? As the lead programmer on two projects, I find it slightly hard to keep up at times, as it is."
Operating Systems

+ - Once again, Dell excludes the UK

Submitted by
perlhacker14
perlhacker14 writes "We all know Dell will be selling machines with Ubuntu preloaded on them; what was not heard was that the Linux PCs are only being offered in the United States at the moment (while the global program was being developed). What was surprising was that the UK is not included in their plans, yet again.

It seems that the UK customers are continually being denied products that Dell is offering in America, with out proper cause, similar to the naked PC scenario. Seeing as Ubuntu has a more 'global' focus than other distributions, should it not be widely distributed across the world, rather than restricted to the US? Why can the UK not receive the same open source capabilities as the rest of the world?

While Dell is doing some good by including Linux on its machines at all, it is not complete until it is available everywhere."
Censorship

+ - Man Explodes Self In Casablanca Internet Cafe

Submitted by perlhacker14
perlhacker14 (1056902) writes "A Moroccan Man with explosives on his body blew himself up in an Internet Cafe in Morocco after he was not allowed to look at terror websites. The man and his companion had entered late at night, seeking to see terrorist propaganda. The bombs were not intended for the cafe, but they did injure four other people there. Most likely the men were about to get "motivated" by terror sites, and then go cause harm to society, but were angered by the refusal to see the said sites.

1: "Man blows himself up in Internet cafe"

2: mail: perlhacker14@gmail.com"

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