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Comment: Re:The third factor (Score 1) 319

by pem (#49503023) Attached to: Can High Intelligence Be a Burden Rather Than a Boon?
Actually, a lot of ADHD people procrastinate on a lot of things, partly because impending doom can be a focusing event that gets them moving.

But while they're procrastinating on things that others would think are important, they are usually working on stuff they think is important. Procrastinating on everything is more likely a sign of something else, perhaps depression.

Comment: Re:The third factor (Score 1) 319

by pem (#49503009) Attached to: Can High Intelligence Be a Burden Rather Than a Boon?
> I wouldn't call being bad at something you don't like a disease.

I wouldn't either. And I don't call ADHD a disease, but it's not what you describe. The typical ADHDer either would love French and (assuming his ADHD does not coexist alongside learning disabilities) learn it really well, or hate it and not bother.

Comment: Re:Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 1) 300

by pem (#49499945) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal
Unfortunately, we cannot legislate against dishonesty or stupidity in a general sense.

But we can and should legislate full disclosure for practically any substance that people are selling. Why are MSDS not available for things you ingest? (The obvious answer -- that they should be perfectly safe anyway, is obviously wrong, once you find that it is entirely possible to OD on a wide range of foodstuffs, and that's even before you get into common and not-so-common allergies.)

Anyway, in a perfect world, everybody would have their own tricorder, and know exactly how to interpret the results. In this world, all we can do is try to educate ourselves and others on result interpretation, and demand that we have good factual data from the people selling us the goods.

Comment: Re:Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 1) 300

by pem (#49498295) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal
> simple bacteria frequently exchange genes

Yes, and people are dying because we don't know how to compensate for this yet. So much for knowing what we're doing.

> you have this notion that transfer of genes between species is some weird thing humans just invented

It's obviously not, or weeds wouldn't be growing resistant to Monsanto's herbicides at what must be an alarming rate to them. Nonetheless, there's a probabilistic thing here -- the rate at which RoundupReady is spreading is obviously partly caused by the huge attempted corn monoculture, and the vast amount of glyphosate sloshing around the environment (making this gene eminently useful in the current environment). Most genes don't propagate across multicellular species anywhere near this quickly, or we probably would have noticed by now.

>agay, you have this bizarre irrational fear

I think you're responding to someone else now, but I'm sure that doesn't matter to you, because you still have this (unfortunately not bizarre) general asshole-ness and superiority complex. Work on it.

Comment: Re:Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 2) 300

by pem (#49498229) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal
Being able to make more changes faster is not a good thing.

Being able to make more changes faster to a system that is not fully understood may be a terrible thing.

Being able to make more changes faster that then get propagated to unwanted species as well as anything in Jurassic Park is not only not a good idea, but ultimately self-defeating.

Being able to make changes that only exist to allow more use of glyphosate, being able to insert fish genes into plants, being able to play god in the same manner as the boy next door in Toy Story, yeah, that might ultimately be a bad thing, too.

Personally, I try to eat older foods, less sweet fruits, etc.

"because we do in the lab intelligently"

Give me a fucking break. Our understanding of biologic systems is still in its infancy.

"what we have been doing informally for thousands of years"

And slowly -- don't ever forget slowly.

" is threatening to you"

I hope it doesn't threaten anybody. But the evidence is still out. Glyphosate on wheat and gluten intolerance? Maybe.

"sign of your ignorance and science illiteracy."

Ahh, now I remember why I come to slashdot. The ability to interact with incompetent know-it-all assholes outside a work setting.

Comment: Good analogy -- music and programming (Score 1) 520

by pem (#49060615) Attached to: Nim Programming Language Gaining Traction
I like your analogy.

I've seen people buy the 'best' musical instruments thinking it will help them play better, it doesn't. Know what does? Practice,experience,time...

I play an instrument. I now play a lot better, because I practice a lot more, because the instrument I bought two years ago is a joy to play and listen to compared to the one I had before.

Different people prefer different instruments, just as different people prefer different languages. Your plea to stop creating/using new ones sounds suspiciously like the argument that everything has already been invented.

If you steal from one author it's plagiarism; if you steal from many it's research. -- Wilson Mizner

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