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Comment: Re:Give me battery or give me death (Score 1) 102 102

My current laptop, a Dell Precision M3800 has it all: light weight, powerful, reasonable (if not fantastic) battery life, 4K screen, and native support for Linux, out of the box but it's hard to figure out what something the same size would be like at 1/4 the weight.

But I'm agreeing with other comments: I'd rather have this exact weight laptop with 3 days of battery life.

A few years back, I bought the phone with the very best battery life and I don't regret it one minute. Now on its third year, the phone still easily powers through a day with 50% or so battery life, and never leaves me high and dry when flying commercially which is when battery life is most important.

My next phone will be the phone with the best battery life Now that I finally have a powerful laptop that isn't also dreadfully heavy, battery life will once again be #1 for my next purchase.

Comment: Re:Your biggest screw up (Score 1) 438 438

Reddit was started as an experiment in free speech.

Wait, what?

I recall Alex coming on Slashdot a lot to promote Reddit when he first launched it. "An experiment in free speech" was not anything I recall being discussed. I also remember him posting on Slashdot while still developing reddit.

What I recall, is promotion of a general interest platform that was more open than Slashdot (unlimited moderations for all!) and less susceptible to vote brigading than Digg.

It was while ago, so I may be a bit foggy on the specifics.

Comment: Re:Dwindling airable land? (Score 1) 256 256

I think what the Libertarians fail to realize is that farmers, as a general rule, are not smart enough to diversify or maintain course.

First, I think that's a ridiculous assertion. Smart farmers don't diversify because the taxpayers bear the risk of their crop failure, or of crashing prices; they have insufficient incentive to diversify.

Second, if we had a true free market, dumb farmers would go out of business and we would be left with smart farmers allocating resources efficiently. Isn't that the point of economic libertarianism?

Note: I am far from libertarian.

Comment: Re:So does this qualify as 'organic'? (Score 1) 256 256

What do you mean by cyclical? Do you mean the livestock/fertilizer/crop/fodder cycle? Do you mean crop rotation? Or something else entirely?

Just curious, since I'm not aware of either cyclical production or crop rotation being a requirement for organic farming (although both are considered best practices).

Comment: Re:A corrupt company stuggling. Boo hoo. (Score 1) 132 132

What's sad is that UOP really could have done it! If they offered actual counseling guidance, and curricula that didn't just suck, and made sure that their clients passed classes with rigor, they could have *easily* made a profitable college with good reviews and earned trust.

Instead, they violated that trust, and probably deserve to be shut down.

Comment: Re:Congratulations Apple! (Score 1) 191 191

You have finally realized that your touchscreen controller actually provides a pressure strength and are able to hype it up like it's revolutionary.

Right now, Apple haven't said a word on the matter, let alone "hyped it up like it's revolutionary". There is zero confirmation from Apple, this is just a blog article based on a rumour.

Comment: Re:Wifi saturation? (Score 1) 152 152

What I find fucks with wifi is big thick walls.

I just bought a house. One of the things I was initially pleased to find is that it was built with full-on, 3/4" sheet rock - quality construction!

That is, until I plugged in my wifi router and tried to connect from my bedroom. I don't know what it is about 3/4" sheetrock made in 1978, but it's practically a Faraday cage. I'm contemplating setting up numerous routers with 1-antenna per room so you can get decent access everywhere in the house.

A compromise position in the hall closet gets the bedrooms *almost* OK through the doors...

Comment: Re:I hate and despise - but they should still be s (Score 1) 818 818

You fail to understand the difference between a legal principle, such as the First Amendment, and a moral principle, such as Free Speech.

I understand it just fine. The parent commenter does not. He was talking about outlawing the flag.

The First Amendment is a legal enactment of the moral principle.

No, if the First Amendment were a legal enactment of the moral principle you describe, it wouldn't stop at restricting the government's right to curtail speech. It would compel Apple to publish this material. It does not. Ergo, the First Amendment is not a legal enactment of the principle you describe. It doesn't go anywhere near as far.

Apple's suppression of Confederate flag, and Civil War video games, and silly TV shows set in the South, is evil.

Nobody has the right to force Apple to use their resources to publish material that they don't want to publish. And Apple choosing not to publish something is not the same thing as them suppressing it. You want the confederate flag, you can get it from other places. Free speech is not about forcing somebody else to publish your crap.

Comment: Re:I hate and despise - but they should still be s (Score 3, Insightful) 818 818

This is a country founded on the idea of Free Speech.

Your country was founded on the principle that the government should not stop anybody from speaking. It wasn't founded on the principle that corporations must be compelled to distribute other people's material regardless of content. Apple are not obligated to publish this material.

Much better than outlawing their vile ideas

Nobody is outlawing anything. This is an example of a business choosing not to publish something.

Comment: Re:Local and small (Score 1) 268 268

This is still a terrible measure, because bible-belt Southerners average close to 7%, while New Englanders average under 3% (source [philanthropy.com]).

It's also a terrible measure because giving to a church is not always the same as giving to a charity. Not saying that all churches aren't charities, just that some spend quite a lot less on charitable works than some other charities.

The generation of random numbers is too important to be left to chance.

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