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Comment: Re:Long on Rhetoric (Score 3, Insightful) 217

by passthecrackpipe (#35072038) Attached to: Firewalls Make DDoS Attacks Worse
In a surprise revelation, a vendor of anti-DDOS equipment claimed that everybody else is doing it wrong, and leaves several subtle hints that their own equipment and services are the only true defence against a concerted DDOS attack. In a further shocking comment, the article disclosed that almost everybody else is constantly under some form of DDOS attack, hinting that you might be next. As a final nail in the coffin of your amateurish "Network Security" the experts reveal that there is nothing you can do - the better you protect your systems, and the more traffic your current systems will be designed to handle, the more aggressive attackers will become.
Security

Do the SSL Watchmen Watch Themselves? 171

Posted by Soulskill
from the barbers-with-a-good-haircut dept.
StrongestLink writes "In an intriguing twist on the recent Comodo CA vulnerability discussed here last week, security researcher Mike Zusman today revealed that three days prior to StartCom's disclosure of a flaw in a Comodo reseller's registration process, he discovered and disclosed an authentication bypass flaw to StartCom in their own registration process that allowed an attacker to submit an authorized request for any domain. During a month which was marked by the continuing paradigm shift to SSL-verified holiday shopping, the Chain of Trust continues to run off the gears, and Bruce Schneier is even commenting publicly that SSL's site validation mission isn't even relevant. What lies ahead for the billion-dollar CA industry?"

Comment: Re:Learn CSS (Score 1) 438

by passthecrackpipe (#26029973) Attached to: Freelance Web Developer Best Practices?
uh, yeah - welcome to the real world. I just finished a lenghty re-design where i was 100% dedicated to not using tables for layout. I require header, 3 column with left and right column fixed width, center column fluid, and footer, with minimum page height to be the browser window and columns being full height. I couldnt cut it, so i hired a CSS expert - the guy was really good, but still the layout failed half the test cases. (we are not writing some blog, we are writing a for-pay publishing platform. our test cases are all based on real usage scenarios). When asking for advice, the advice was either "do it so and so" which is what we were already doing, or, my personal favorite, "why do you need this layout, it sucks". Whenever i hear the last argument, in whatever context, I know that the technical approach i chose will not be able to cut it, and here are the "cover up" brigade. Throughout this ordeal, our template pages became increasingly incomprehensible and difficult to code with. DIV's nested to stupid levels, etc. I made the decision to swap to tables for our layout. It took me about 30 minutes to effect this change, and stuff Just Works(tm). There are serious and real problems with CSS layouts, and unless these are adressed, tables will continue to see use, especially by people that have a job to finish. My boss doesnt care how i do the site layout, he trusts me to make the right decisions. part of that decision tree is to ensure that i strike a balance that involves cost and time to market somewhere.

Comment: Re:Power of community + run by the community? (Score 1) 244

by passthecrackpipe (#25856569) Attached to: <em>Tabula Rasa</em> To Shut Down
and who will donate the incredible amount of high quality artwork in all forms required to make a good MMO? and not only do you need lots of high quality artwork, it also needs to be done along the same style and theme, and be artistically consistent. the people that have the skills and talent to make art for are an MMO are usually too busy with their dayjob.
Power

PC Makers Try To Pinch Seconds From Their Boot Times 399

Posted by timothy
from the an-operating-system-called-linux dept.
Some computers are never turned off, or at least rarely see any state less active than "standby," but others (for power savings or other reasons) need rebooting — daily, or even more often. The New York Times is running a short article which says that it's not just a few makers like Asus who are trying to take away some of the pain of waiting for computers, especially laptops, to boot up. While it's always been a minor annoyance to wait while a computer slowly grinds itself to readiness, "the agitation seems more intense than in the pre-Internet days," and manufacturers are actively trying to cut that wait down to a more bearable length. How bearable? A "very good system is one that boots in under 15 seconds," according to a Microsoft blog cited, and an HP source names an 18-month goal of 20-30 seconds.

A Brief History of Features Apple Has Killed 461

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the or-you-might-be-a-fanboi dept.
Technologizer writes "Some folks are outraged over the lack of FireWire in the new MacBook released this week. But Apple wouldn't be Apple if it didn't move faster than any other computer company to kill technologies that may be past their prime. And history usually validates its decisions. We've posted a decade's worth of examples that prove the point."
Communications

Extended Gmail Outage Frustrates Admins 430

Posted by timothy
from the pulling-out-doesn't-sound-manly dept.
CWmike writes "A prolonged, ongoing Gmail outage has some Google Apps administrators pulling their hair out as their end users, including high-ranking executives, complain loudly while they wait for service to be restored. At about 5 p.m. US Eastern on Wednesday, Google announced that the company was aware of the problem preventing Gmail users from logging into their accounts and that it expected to fix it by 9 p.m. on Thursday. Google offered no explanation of the problem or why it would take it so long to solve the problem, a '502' error when trying to access Gmail. Google said the bug is affecting 'a small number of users,' but that is little comfort for Google Apps administrators. Admin Bill W. posted a desperate message on the forum Thursday morning, saying his company's CEO is steaming about being locked out of his e-mail account since around 4 p.m. on Wednesday. It's not the first Gmail outage. So, will this one prompt calls for a service-level agreement for paying customers? And a more immediate question: Why no Gears for offline Gmail access at very least, Google?"
Google

Android Also Comes With a Kill-Switch 300

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the now-that's-not-very-open dept.
Aviran writes "The search giant is retaining the right to delete applications from Android handsets on a whim. Unlike Apple, the company has made no attempt to hide its intentions, and includes the details in the Android Market terms and conditions, as spotted by Computer World: 'Google may discover a product that violates the developer distribution agreement... in such an instance, Google retains the right to remotely remove those applications from your device at its sole discretion.'"
Real Time Strategy (Games)

Rights To Virtual Property In Games? 167

Posted by Soulskill
from the you-stole-my-cloudsong dept.
With the rise of MMOs and other persistent environments over the last decade, the trafficking of virtual game property has become a multi-billion dollar industry. Regardless of whether the buying and trading goes on with the blessing of the content provider (or, in many cases, the owner of the account in question), the question of players' rights to virtual goods is coming to the forefront. The Escapist Magazine takes a look at how some companies are structuring their EULA in this regard, and what some countries, such as China, are doing to handle the issue. "... the differences between China and the West in this case have more to do with scale than cultural norms. So many people play online games in Asia — and play them so intensely — that social problems in meatspace society inevitably emerge in virtual worlds as well. ... The general consensus, therefore, is that paradigm shifts like the ones that have already occurred in Asia will inevitably come to the West, and with them, the need for legislative scaffolding that keeps us all from killing each other."

Loan-department manager: "There isn't any fine print. At these interest rates, we don't need it."

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