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Comment: Re:I'll believe it when I see it (Score 2) 171

by pantaril (#48580419) Attached to: Julian Assange Trying To Raise Nearly $200k For a Statue of Himself

My first reaction was: how many stupid slashdoters would label Assange as egomaniac, rapist and criminal based on totaly misleading informations in summary, how many slashdoters would rather side with opressive practices of U.S. (and other) governments instead of Assange and wikileaks, which are trying to fight it?

The answer is predictably and unfortunately: quite a lot.

Comment: Re:Free Enterprise (Score 1) 184

by pantaril (#48564131) Attached to: Swedish Police Raid the Pirate Bay Again

That's ultimately the problem with these arguments. A system without any sort of intellectual property makes it much more difficult for anyone to spend significant time on any given creative project, since no money can be made from that lost time... let alone taking any time to learn a skilled craft.

Wrong, we can have system which ensures money for creators without intelectual property. We can for example replace the current copyright law (which ensures that you pay for something because you can't copy it) with mandatory monthly payments (you crowdpay creative works you like, you can choose what to support but you have to spent something based on your income/wealth etc.) and the resulting works could be in public domain available to everyone.

Comment: Re:tl;dr (Score 1) 200

by pantaril (#48324653) Attached to: Net Neutrality Alone Won't Solve ISP Throttling Abuse, Here's Why

Net neutrality doesn't mean that ISPs can't use QoS to mark and prioritize real-time traffic like VoIP, IPTV etc. over http. They can do it but they must not discriminate between different VOIP/streaming providers. For example net-neutral ISP cannot prioritize its own streaming service and throttle competition like Netflix.

Comment: Re:Yes yes yes (Score 1) 405

Yes. Cleaning the homes of people who own factories.

What happens when we get to a point where we just don't need everyone to work in order to provide the goods and services people want? I'm thinking we may have already reached that point in some developed countries. Then what?

Unless we're prepared to have some big (and forced) reductions in populations, we had better get comfortable with larger welfare states.

As technology and automation advances, there will be more and more job oportunities. The problem is, those jobs will require very high specialization and qualification which only few percent of population can reach. Not anybody can be rocket engineer,microchip designer etc.

I agree with you that wealth redistribution (in the form of welfare, basic unconditional income etc.) is the right solution.

Comment: Re:Less static hardware. (Score 1) 993

by pantaril (#48081739) Attached to: Lennart Poettering: Open Source Community "Quite a Sick Place To Be In"

Guess what doesn't happen on my server? Yes, random hardware appearing and disappearing while it sits there for years running one app... Systemd has no obvious benefit to servers

Just because your server doesn't take advantage of hotpluging doesn't mean that other people don't use it on their servers. There is plenty of scenarios where hotpluging is useful for servers, please don't force your server usage pattern on everyone else. I for one welcome the changes which systemd brings even for the servers.

Comment: Re:Question about how this works (Score 2) 236

by pantaril (#48001177) Attached to: First Shellshock Botnet Attacking Akamai, US DoD Networks

I'm still waiting for an example of how to get to this so-called vulnerability, without using a different security hole to get to it. Either some moron letting the web server call bash directly, or someone not sanitizing his inputs.

I disagree that using shell CGI scripts should be considered security hole any more than using CGI scripts written in any other language, but if you want other examples of exploiting this bug you can do it via malicious DHCP responses processed by dhcpclient or by env. variables passed when loging in via SSH.

Comment: Re:Question about how this works (Score 3, Informative) 236

by pantaril (#48001145) Attached to: First Shellshock Botnet Attacking Akamai, US DoD Networks

but if you don't do something stupid like eval your those environment variables it doesn't turn into such a mess.

Your CGI script doesn't need to do anything at all. The rogue code injected into the env. variables is parsed and executed by bash when it sets-up the environment for your script.

Comment: Re:Emma Watson is full of it (Score 1) 590

by pantaril (#47991039) Attached to: Emma Watson Leaked Photo Threat Was a Plot To Attack 4chan

Of course, now you have your "wage gap", which in reality is a "work gap".

This is not true. Any sane methodology used to compare wages excludes over time hours (which are paid separately, at least in EU). See for example the Methodology paragraph on this site, which describes how they do it in UK.

Comment: Re:Why wouldn't they? (Score 1) 67

by pantaril (#47799239) Attached to: The Apache Software Foundation Now Accepting BitCoin For Donations

No, they accept USD, or whatever fiat currency they specify, with a transaction processor like Bitpay converting BTC to fiat on the spot.

I think you missunderstand the meaning of the word 'accept'. From merriam-webster dictionary:

accept
verb \ik-sept, ak- also ek-\

: to receive or take (something offered)

: to take (something) as payment

: to be able or designed to take or hold (something)

I think that it is clear that to 'accept' something as payment you don't need to hold it afterwars. You are free to convert it to something else or use it in any other way you see fit. To give you some example, few people would argue that steam, google play or blizzard online store is not accepting euros because they convert it to dollars after the purchase.

Comment: Re:Why wouldn't they? (Score 2) 67

by pantaril (#47799201) Attached to: The Apache Software Foundation Now Accepting BitCoin For Donations

I can think of one downside: People might be less willing to pay with Bitcoin if they don't get the protections that they'd get from their bank's credit or debit card

Accepting bitcoins doesn't mean that you stop taking other forms of payments so this is no valid downside for merchant who start to accept bitcoins in addition to existing forms of payments.

"Why should we subsidize intellectual curiosity?" -Ronald Reagan

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