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The Military

US Army Releases Code For Internal Forensics Framework 37

Posted by Soulskill
from the see-what-kind-of-code-your-tax-dollars-can-buy dept.
An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Army Research Laboratory in Maryland has released on GitHub a version of a Python-based internal forensics tool which the army itself has been using for five years. Dshell is a Linux-based framework designed to help investigators identify and examine compromised IT environments. One of the intentions of the open-sourcing of the project is to involve community developers in the creation of new modules for the framework. The official release indicates that the version of Dshell released to Github is not necessarily the same one that the Army uses, or at least that the module package might be pared down from the Army-issued software.

Comment: Re:Escaping only helps you until a war. (Score 3, Insightful) 339

by paazin (#48911669) Attached to: Davos 2015: Less Innovation, More Regulation, More Unrest. Run Away!
The key here is not a ten percent tax rate but ten percent of wealth.

I assume the GP was stating this in reference to a suggestion by Thomas Piketty as to what would be a more "just" (in his definition) tax approach to tackle inequality.

Comment: Re:Convenient! (Score 3, Insightful) 148

by paazin (#48676189) Attached to: Crowds (and Pirates) Flock To 'The Interview'
Are you implying that this was a publicity stunt planned by Sony?

The idea that Sony would be willing to accept the liability massive costs with disclosing private information of its employees really beggars belief; what money they could have made from the film would really not be worth the potential risk here.

Comment: Re:Oh, Argentina (Score 2) 165

by paazin (#47830697) Attached to: Buenos Aires Issues a 'Netflix Tax' For All Digital Entertainment
It's basically a case of the US courts showing to the world that countries may not want to work within the US system to deal with bonds as it fair serious hindrance to sovereignty. The council on foreign relations stated it was probably one of the worst decisions in recent court history and could potentially move a great deal of finance from New York to other hubs.
Transportation

Solar Roadways Project Beats $1M Goal, Should Enter Production 311

Posted by timothy
from the ok-but-what's-the-resolution dept.
Lucas123 (935744) writes "It appears an Idaho-based company that created prototype panels for constructing roads that (among other features) gather solar power, will be going into production after it exceeded its crowdfunding goal of $1M. ... Solar Roadways' Indiegogo project has already exceeded $1.6 million. The hexagonal-shaped solar panels consist of four layers, including photovoltaic cells, LED lights, an electronic support structure (circuit board) and a base layer made of recyclable materials. The panels plug together to form circuits that can then use LED lights to create any number of traffic patterns, as well as issue lighted warnings for drivers. The panels also have the ability to melt snow and ice. Along with the crowdfunding money, Solar Roadways has received federal grant money for development."
Bitcoin

DarkMarket, the Decentralized Answer To Silk Road, Is About More Than Just Drugs 251

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the keep-telling-yourself-that dept.
Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "If you were anywhere near the internet last week, you would have come across reports of 'DarkMarket', a new system being touted as a Silk Road the FBI could never seize. Although running in a similar fashion on the face of things — some users buy drugs, other sell them — DarkMarket works in a fundamentally different way to Silk Road or any other online marketplace. Instead of being hosted off a server like a normal website, it runs in a decentralized manner: Users download a piece of software onto their device, which allows them to access the DarkMarket site. The really clever part is how the system incorporates data with the blockchain, the part of Bitcoin that everybody can see. Rather than just carrying the currency from buyer to seller, data such as user names are added to the blockchain by including it in very small transactions, meaning that its impossible to impersonate someone else because their pseudonymous identity is preserved in the ledger. Andy Greenberg has a good explanation of how it works over at Wired. The prototype includes nearly everything needed for a working marketplace: private communications between buyers and sellers, Bitcoin transfers to make purchases, and an escrow system that protects the cash until it is confirmed that the buyer has received their product. Theoretically, being a decentralized and thus autonomous network, it would still run without any assistance from site administrators, and would certainly make seizing a central server, as was the case with the original Silk Road, impossible."
Your Rights Online

Imminent Server Seizure Tests Brazil's New Internet Bill of Rights 52

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the exercising-freedom-of-speech-is-dangerous dept.
sunbird (96442) writes "Less than one week after passing the Marco Civil da Internet, Article 3 of which purports to protect free expression and privacy of personal data from government intrusion, a Public Prosecutor in Brazil is seeking to seize a server hosting research groups, social movements, discussion lists and other tools. The server is hosted by the Saravá Group, which has adopted a policy of not storing connection logs to protect the privacy of users. The Public Prosecutor is seeking to identify individuals involved in Rádio Mudo, a project hosted by Saravá, but as Saravá does not store logs, there is no information on the server that is responsive to the investigation. This action comes as Brazil seeks to place itself in the forefront of protecting internet privacy after it hosted the Net Mundial conference. Saravá has called for a protest action today at 1PM local time (9AM PT/12noonET) to protest against the seizure."
Programming

How 'DevOps' Is Killing the Developer 226

Posted by Soulskill
from the in-the-server-room-with-the-lamp-stack dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Python guru Jeff Knupp writes about his frustration with the so-called 'DevOps' movement, an effort to blend development jobs with operations positions. It's an artifact of startup culture, and while it might make sense when you only have a few employees and a focus on simply getting it running rather than getting it running right, Knupp feels it has no place in bigger, more established companies. He says, 'Somewhere along the way, however, we tricked ourselves into thinking that because, at any one time, a start-up developer had to take on different roles he or she should actually be all those things at once. If such people even existed, "full-stack" developers still wouldn't be used as they should. Rather than temporarily taking on a single role for a short period of time, then transitioning into the next role, they are meant to be performing all the roles, all the time. And here's what really sucks: most good developers can almost pull this off.' Knupp adds, 'The effect of all of this is to destroy the role of "developer" and replace it with a sort of "technology utility-player". Every developer I know got into programming because they actually enjoyed doing it (at one point). You do a disservice to everyone involved when you force your brightest people to take on additional roles.'"

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