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Comment: Re:going after GMO is like banning screwdrivers (Score 1) 510

by ozydingo (#45875871) Attached to: Anti-GMO Activists Win Victory On Hawaiian Island

I thought trans fat was only about texture and stability / shelf life (while being cheaper than animal fats). Do you have more info on the claim that trans fats were thought to help prevent heart disease?

Additionally, there are some natural trans fats too, but they do not have the same effect on heart disease as currently manufactured trans fats

Comment: Re:going after GMO is like banning screwdrivers (Score 1) 510

by ozydingo (#45875825) Attached to: Anti-GMO Activists Win Victory On Hawaiian Island

Maybe I'm missing something but, but you appear to be asking what currently available GMO crops contain "entirely separate species". Ignore this if I misread.

There are only a few currently on-the-market GM crops, where GM refers to transgenic modification, not hybridization. Probably the most commonly known is the Roundup ready line of crops, including soy and corn, but I'm a little sketchy on the details. It appears to have something to do with the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens . Almost as commonly known are crops such as Bt corn and potatoes, which have a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis , The SunUp papaya has a gene fragment from the papaya ringspot virus. Liberty Link corn, soy, etc., has a gene isolated from Streptomyces bacteria. Golden rice has been produced different ways, including genes from daffodil, bacteria, and corn.

Anyway, that's a partial list, in case you're interested. I don't suppose you are actually claiming that there is no practical difference between cross-breeding and transgenics.

Comment: Re:I Love Americans (Score 1) 456

Probably most of them. But a few that I know better I'd be pretty confident in saying the feeling is their own. Still might be a more chronic version of what you're talking about, where people learn to "care" about the kinds of "news" that get clicks and headlines. Maybe you don't see that as any different...anyway I do.

Comment: Re:Cashing in on the Chick-fil-A effect (Score 1) 456

There will still be homophobes and other bigots but they'll keep their mouths shut and hopefully their children won't learn their bigotry.

They'll keep their mouths a little more shut in public, and maybe that will actually lead to some good (maybe), but not to their children. Strong opinions + lack of open conversation = more polarization.

And, to me, it is the point. There are issues I frankly care more about a food company's position on than whether a pasta company dude thinks that the iconic family that he wants to portray in his ads includes a woman in the kitchen. I don't speak for Minupla, and have no problem if this issue makes or brakes his pasta-buying choices over other issues that I wished more people cared more about. But against his point as stated, I think my point stands valid.

Comment: Re:Apologies... (Score 2) 456

by ozydingo (#44980303) Attached to: Social Networks Force Barilla Chairman To Apologize For His Anti-gay Remarks

Sometimes apologies don't mean shit. It's far more important to know what people really believe.

Which is one of the reasons I did/do not support this boycott. Best I could tell, he expressed his opinion, but wasn't or isn't actively trying to suppress gay rights. If we boycott companies for honestly stating opinions, as is my read of this situation (please inform me of any more relevant details, however), then we don't change their opinions, we just change what they say. Everybody loses.

Comment: Re:GM Rice NOT passing to weeds (Score 1) 208

by ozydingo (#44616219) Attached to: GM Rice Passes Unexpected Benefits To Weeds

"GM rice passes unexpected benefits to weeds" is true. This does not imply that this is occurring on any particular scale at any particular location, it just states that it happens. Which it does. When GM rice cross-breeds with a wild variety, the offspring has a benefit.

To this point, the weeds were not GM'd directly with the transgenic gene, they were cross-bred with GM rice crop. So, it is reasonable to suspect this is likely to happen in the wild. I wonder how difficult it is to collect a reasonably meaningful survey of wild crops to detect this occurrence, and if anyone has attempted it.

Comment: Re:Wait...what? (Score 1) 208

by ozydingo (#44616189) Attached to: GM Rice Passes Unexpected Benefits To Weeds

As I have read it (in the paper itself), the authors cross-bred the rice & weedy rice, then split up the following generation of plants into those that expressed or did not express the modified gene. So the comparison was amongst hybrids. Still, it may be that this division has an inherent bias as to the presence or absence of other beneficial genes from the food crop, so it is interesting to question what the mechanism behind the reported benefits were.

The take-home point, however, is still that the hybrids containing the modified gene possessed an advantage over hybrids not containing that gene.

Comment: Re:Wait...what? (Score 1) 208

by ozydingo (#44616147) Attached to: GM Rice Passes Unexpected Benefits To Weeds
Calling it "insanely dangerous" and talking about a famine in 5-10 years may be going all tin-foil hat, but you still can see why faster can potentially mean more dangerous, right? (Of course, I'd be more inclined to spend energy on investigating the Bt modification than the roundup ready, but anywho...)

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