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Comment Re:Same Origin already broken in Chrome (Score 1) 54

Cors in general is broken in general and for numerous reasons but on the client side more than server side.

Cors should be good. Cors could be good. But its primitive, difficult to write with when dealing with things such as Hybrid mobile development. If Web Services need a header acceptance policy solution then drop the same origin policy anyway and make it a totally separate thing. Make it so same origin resource sharing on the local side is blocked by default with an established white-listing system in place the also records management of how the resources are used would be even better!

You can get some of that that with the inspection tools on Chromium now but it would be far better if it was more definitive. E.G LocalStorage we could know when requests are made rather than just seeing the variables change.

Submission + - OpenSSL to fix two security defects, one is high severity. (openssl.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Forthcoming OpenSSL releases
============================

The OpenSSL project team would like to announce the forthcoming release of
OpenSSL versions 1.0.2f, 1.0.1r.

These releases will be made available on 28th January between approx. 1pm and
5pm (UTC). They will fix two security defects, one of "high" severity affecting
1.0.2 releases, and one "low" severity affecting all releases.

Please see the following page for further details of severity levels:
https://www.openssl.org/polici...

Please also note that, as per our previous announcements, support for 1.0.0 and
0.9.8 releases ended on 31st December 2015 and are no longer receiving security
updates. Support for 1.0.1 will end on 31st December 2016.

Yours

The OpenSSL Project Team

Submission + - Apple patents phone where bending is a feature, not a flaw (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Imagine if your phone didn't need a protective cover, and you could drop it from almost any height without breaking it? And what if, despite being as big as the iPhone 6 Plus, your phone could be folded up and stashed in your pocket?
That phone doesn't exist today, but Apple has now been granted a US patent for such a device that could see a future iPhone that moves more like a slice of silicon than metal or glass. All Apple needs to do now is figure out how to build it.

Submission + - W3 releases drafts: Webmention & Social Web Protocals (w3.org)

oztiks writes: The Social Web Working Group has published two First Public Working Drafts:

Webmention: Webmention is a simple way to notify any URL when you link to it on your site. From the receiver’s perspective, it’s a way to request notifications when other sites link to it.

Social Web Protocols: The Social Web Protocols are a collection of standards which enable various aspects of decentralized social interaction on the Web. This document describes the purposes of each, and how they fit together.

Submission + - Tesla will have self-driving cars in just two years, Elon Musk boldly declares (bgr.com)

An anonymous reader writes: n a new interview with Fortune, outspoken Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that the electric automaker is just two years away from developing fully autonomous vehicles that can operate ably and safely in any type of environment. While Musk has long championed an automotive age filled with self-driving cars, this is the most optimistic timeline for their deployment we’ve seen Musk make yet. In fact, Musk in 2014 said that the requisite technology to manufacture a self driving car was still about five to six years away.

“I think we have all the pieces,” Musk said, “and it’s just about refining those pieces, putting them in place, and making sure they work across a huge number of environments—and then we’re done. It’s a much easier problem than people think it is.”

Submission + - Hong Kong Investor Buys 65% Of Russia's Yota, Maker Of Dual-Screen Android Phone (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Yota Devices, the Russian company that sells two-screened Android smartphones, has a new owner after shareholder Telconet Capital sold its majority 64.9 percent holding to Hong Kong-listed REX Global Entertainment for $100 million, according to a regulatory filing.

Yota caught the attention with a unique dual-screen smartphone which takes aim at the increasingly homogeneous design of phones by offering an e-ink screen on its reverse. Its first device — called simply the Yota Phone — emerged in December 2012 and was subsequently sold in 20 markets across Europe, Russia and Middle East. Yota didn’t disclose sales figures, but media reports suggest it didn’t fare well.

Comment Re:Google seems to be avoiding the real problem (Score 1) 95

I can say Crosswalk is really the step up that's needed for both iOS and Android and wIth ECMA being enforced with more and more browsers over time. The problem is just that its 40 meg to download.

I can see this AMP project as good pretext for quick and instant functionality, though from downloading the examples and reading a bit about it. It really needs a lot more work before it would become useful to me or any of the projects i'm presently on.

People bitching about mobile websites are in for a real shock when Google Cardboard and Accelerometer tech comes into play for the web. Just imagine looking at a website menu items by simply shifting the pitch and angle of your phone. I'd say 6-12 months before that happens. And with Apple being supported by Cardboard I'm surprised it already hasn't happened! But even without cardboard, Accelerometer navigated website should really be the next thing.

Submission + - Microsoft's Marketing Team and the Art of Shooting Self in Foot (theverge.com)

Apocryphos writes: We have all seen Microsoft's questionable marketing moves in the past, but their pride and joy seems to be copying the styles of their competitors poorly and a year late usually resulting in a cringe-generating commercial spots. Apple seems to be able to consistently appeal with the style of their ads, but not so with Microsoft. Now they are taking old internet memes and reincarnating them as a corporate vehicle. I, for one, am having fun imagining a marketing consultant telling Microsoft leadership that it's a viable strategy to "Create viral marketing on social media".

Submission + - Barbie gets a brain (nytimes.com)

minstrelmike writes: Mattel is coming out with a Talking Barbie designed by a huge team to be your best friend. She is pre-scripted with thousands of responses controlled by an AI with designs to be your best friend.

The design team remembers the "Math is hard" debacle of the 1990s and if a girl asks if she's pretty, Barbie will respond, "Yes. And you're smart, too." If she asks if Barbie believes in God, she says a person's beliefs are personal. And suggests talking to grownups about some problems.

Barbie Wants to Get to Know Your Child even discusses trying to avoid edited vids on YouTube by scripting out words such as cockroach.

Submission + - Can living in total darkness for 5 days "reset" the visual system? (nautil.us)

the_newsbeagle writes: That's what one neuroscientist is aiming to find out. He wants to put patients with a type of amblyopia, the vision problem commonly called lazy eye, into the dark for 5 days. His hypothesis: When they emerge, their brains' visual cortices will be temporarily "plastic" and changeable, and may begin to process the visual signals from their bad eyes correctly. Before he could do this study, though, he had to do a test run to figure out logistics. So he himself lived in a pitch black room for 5 days. One finding: Eating ravioli in the dark is hard.

Comment Re:Very sad - but let's get legislation in place N (Score 1) 706

I'd say its not a fair declare fault until we know with 100% certainty that it was in fact a "hack" of some sorts. Lets say it was an inside job and a simple case of data theft in the workplace. Even the NSA cant guard against such things (Snowden). Of course you can permission control data, etc. But there is always a small few that has complete access.

Besides, in many countries what you say is already in place. Under things such as the Corporations Act. Directors are held liable for the companies behavior. The problem being nobody prosecutes these laws. I'd go as far to say that Executives having knowledge of security issues and not acting is negligence in its most simplest form.

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