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Comment Germany begins "The Great Shutdown" (Score 1) 291

ALL nuclear power will be ended in Germany by 2022. All but three stations will closed by 2021, wityh the final three being shuttered and buried the next year, if they need the power still, but not after. In related news, Germany plans to double renewables by 2020. Go ahead and troll rate me down, it won't change the news.

Submission + - Swiped tokens expose Android devices to data theft (

tsamsoniw writes: "Researchers at the University of Ulm have found that eavesdroppers can intercept and use authentication tokens sent between Android apps and Google services via unsecured Wifi . Those tokens, which aren't tied to specific devices or sessions, can be used to peek at and tweak a users email, contacts, and calendar. Devices running Android 2.3.3 or earlier (which accounts for the vast majority of phones) are most vulnerable, but there are steps devs, Google, and users can take to reduce the risks."

Submission + - Q&A with former Fukushima Dai-1 manager (

An anonymous reader writes: Tsuneo Futami was in charge of the Fukushima Dai-1 nuclear power plant from 1997 to 2000. He talked with IEEE Spectrum about the engineering challenges he took on while managing the plant, his opinions on whether TEPCO could have handled the emergency better, and why the spent fuel pools at Fukushima Dai-1 worry him.

Submission + - "No math degree" law for cell phones in Manitoba (

Barbara, not Barbie writes: Tired of cell-phone contracts that have hidden cancellation fees or require a math degree to figure out? Manitoba has passed a law that requires the following:

Customers can cancel a contract before end of term, a ban on unreasonable cancellation fees and unilateral contract changes, minimum monthly cost to be included in advertisements, no charges while defective equipment is out of service unless it's your fault, and limits to automatic renewals.

Hopefully the law will "go viral" with politicians looking for a way to please disgruntled voters.


Submission + - University Copyright Case About To Go To Trial (

Nidi62 writes: A Duke University blog covers the possible ramifications of the latest motion in the copyright case against Georgia State University. Cambrigde, Oxford, and Sage have proposed an injunction that would first enjoin GSU to include all faculty, employees, students. All copying would have to be monitored and limited to 10% of a work or 1000 words, whichever is less. No two classes would be allowed to use the same copied work unless they paid for it, essentially taking fair use out of the classroom. Along with this, courses would be allowed to be made up of only 10% copied material, the other 90% must be either purchased works or copies that have been paid for by permission fees. And, if this isn't enough, the publishers also want access to all computer systems on the campus network, to monitor compliance and copying.

This proposed order, in short, represents a nightmare, a true dystopia, for higher education....Yet you can be sure that if [these] things happen, all of our campuses would be pressured to adopt the “Georgia State model” in order to avoid litigation.

Disclosure: I am currently a graduate student at Georgia State University.


Submission + - New Bill makes Streaming a Felony ( 3

halfEvilTech writes: Two months ago, the Obama administration asked Congress to make illicit online streaming of copyrighted movies and TV shows a felony. Such a bill has now been introduced by two senators.

So now even streaming a Movie across the internet could be considered more severe than say a DUI. Not to mention what this would do in states with 3 strikes laws for felonies.

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