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Comment: Re:Oh no (Score 2) 297

by orasio (#48350515) Attached to: Study: Body Weight Heavily Influenced By Heritable Gut Microbes

They are identical on paper, but not for a person.

It's a lot easier to get energy from doughnuts than from broccoli.

It's 5 medium doughnuts versus 5 broccoli bunches. I'm pretty sure I can have 5 doughnuts in a sitting, but not 5 broccoli bunches.

There's a lot of fiber in broccoli, so even if you manage to have all that broccoli, you will have a hard time extracting many calories from it. In any case, it will be slow, so at least it keeps you full for a longer time than doughnuts.

Comment: Re:Oh no (Score 4, Interesting) 297

by orasio (#48349249) Attached to: Study: Body Weight Heavily Influenced By Heritable Gut Microbes

That's what is being done nowadays, counting calories.

The problem is that calorie consumption is not constant. It's more like household economy.

If you earn (eat) a lot every day, you will probably end up with a lot of savings (belly fat).

One way of getting rid of those savings (belly fat) is taking a lower paying job (dieting). The problem is that your savings don't magically dissappear, and you can make changes that allow you to keep your savings (fat), even with a lower income (daily calorie intake).

Another way you can get rid of your savings is just spending more daily (like exercise). The problem is that, if you have a good enough income (daily intake), and sizable savings, you will only lose capital (weight) in the long run, no sizable short term effect.

So, a fat person body works, in what respects to calories, like a financially savvy household. Going skinny would be like going broke. Some of us could benefit from a way to teach our bodies to do a bit worse in the calorie finance department. Could be a lot easier than just dieting, exercising or both.

Comment: Re:Linux will NEVER be a Desktop - Every Day OS. (Score 1) 727

by orasio (#47719545) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

I use Windows 8 at one of my computers at home.
Those instructions don't work there. You need to do some additional steps before, to summon the "Open Network Center" option.

In any case, what I was responding to the troll was not that Ubuntu has a great magic and beautiful way of changing the IP, only that it doesn't require a console.
Like you explained, in most Windows versions, the process is more or less the same, which was my point.

Comment: Re:Linux will NEVER be a Desktop - Every Day OS. (Score 2, Informative) 727

by orasio (#47715417) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

Feeding the shill/troll here...

Linux is was not, and is not meant to be anything but a hobby OS for someones spare time, or a companies spare time that they can develop a UI for and deploy their own flavors (android, Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc.) Linux is far too complicated for the everyday user to understand. Even something as simple as entering a static IP address sometimes requires going back to the terminal windows (command prompt) and setting it the hard way. And THAT's the problem with Linux! It was never meant to be a GUI OS just like it's parent, UNIX.

That's why desktop users use Ubuntu.
1 - Open network meny by clicking network indicator at the top bar of the desktop
2 - Choose "edit connections"
3 - Choose the connection you want to edit - click "edit"
4 - Click "IPv4 settings"
5 - Change IP

Please, remind me how that's done in windows 8.1. Feel free to explain differences with windows 8, 7 , XP.

The drivers for Linux SUCK and that's because it's an open source OS and there's no one "single" distro.

Just like any other OS. Supported hardware works, and in this case, backwards compatibility is maintained. Unsupported hardware, shockingly, doesn't work.

Comment: Re:It's not a kernel problem (Score 1) 727

by orasio (#47715349) Attached to: Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'

Give us a nice, simple, standard GUI without a bazillion customisations, and with the ability to to just install an app from the GUI and run it from the GUI, and Linux might actually work on the desktop.

You can find all of that at http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/ .
Millions of people are already using it, for years now.
The only challenge it might have, is that it complies with the simplicity and ease of use you demand. But that's for hardcore users to care about, and they have alternatives.

+ - New Type-C USB connector ready for production->

Submitted by orasio
orasio (188021) writes "One of the most frustrating first world problems ever, trying to connect an upside down Micro-USB connector, is bound to dissappear soon.
Type-C connector for USB is declared ready for production by the USB Promoter Group (http://www.usb.org/press/USB_Type-C_Specification_Announcement_Final.pdf)."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Strength (Score 1) 62

by orasio (#47559405) Attached to: 3-D Printing Comes To Amazon

You can print in a plethora of different materials; this includes metals and extremely hard plastics.

The strength and martial properties of medals comes from the arrangement of the crystal lattices. These are things that 3D printing cannot do.

These are things that 3D printing doesn't do maybe. But most certaintly it is feasible. And once that's achieved, you will be able to create metals with a la carte properties.

Comment: Re:We have an advertising bubble... (Score 1) 154

by orasio (#47094891) Attached to: Agree or Disagree: We are in another tech bubble.

Sorry for taking so long to respond.

I agree with you, the government can do anything with info.
The thing is that if it were government itself, there would be a chance for public scrutiny, in every step of the process.
When it's a commercial entity, you will never know what happens with your data, and the government will get it secretly. You are still at risk of the government tracking you, but no one is accountable.

Comment: Re:We have an advertising bubble... (Score 2) 154

by orasio (#47066179) Attached to: Agree or Disagree: We are in another tech bubble.

Of course, in general, governments want to keep tabs on things, so don't expect intrusive behavior to stop. The collected data just goes to a nation, not an ad company.

Very insightful. The good thing about governments being visibly a part of infrastructure is that we know they are powerful, and the problem with them looking into our life is very visible. Also, we have a chance for transparency.

Comment: Re:Corporate speak (Score 1) 373

by orasio (#47046803) Attached to: The 69 Words GM Employees Can Never Say

Actually, avoiding certain words makes sense if those words bolster a legal case against GM, as a partial admission of guilt. Same reason your side mirrors still bear that stupid warning about objects being closer than they appear. Fix your silly legal system that allows anyone to sue anyone over anything, and if their case has any merit, gives them a chance to win the damages or out of court settlement lottery.

With great power, comes great responsibility.

In Europe, or here in some parts of Latin America, the government will stand in the way of business, certifying what you can and cannot do, forcing you to meet certain safety standards, and to provide specific warranties for customers. Even customers or workers can have a say in what companies can and cannot do. Civil responsibility when something goes wrong is not so high, because the company can use their compl|

In the US, people don't like government meddling in the way of companies and business are a lot freer to do business as they see fit. The most important thing standing in the way of a company harming their customers or others, to improve the bottom line, is the threat of losing a whole lot of money in a lawsuit. If you remove that part, there would be nothing to balance the profit vs safety equation.

When I left you, I was but the pupil. Now, I am the master. - Darth Vader

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