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Submission + - Crowdfunding for Science - Can it Succeed? (

jearbear writes: "Can crowdfunding work for science? Having raised nearly $40,000 for scientific research in 10 days for projects as diverse as biofuel catalyst design to the study of cellular cilia to deploying seismic sensor networks (that attach to your computer!) to robotic squirrels, the #SciFund Challenge is taking off like a rocket. Might this be a future model for science funding in the U.S. and abroad? What would that mean?"

The Transistor Wars 120

An anonymous reader writes "This article has an interesting round-up of how chipmakers are handling the dwindling returns of pursuing Moore's Law. Intel's about four years ahead of the rest of the semiconductor industry with its new 3D transistors. But not everyone's convinced 3D is the answer. 'There's a simple reason everyone's contemplating a redesign: The smaller you make a CMOS transistor, the more current it leaks when it's switched off. This leakage arises from the device's geometry. A standard CMOS transistor has four parts: a source, a drain, a channel that connects the two, and a gate on top to control the channel. When the gate is turned on, it creates a conductive path that allows electrons or holes to move from the source to the drain. When the gate is switched off, this conductive path is supposed to disappear. But as engineers have shrunk the distance between the source and drain, the gate's control over the transistor channel has gotten weaker. Current sneaks through the part of the channel that's farthest from the gate and also through the underlying silicon substrate. The only way to cut down on leaks is to find a way to remove all that excess silicon.'"

Submission + - Michigan: Police Search Cell Phones During Traffic ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: The Michigan State Police have a high-tech mobile forensics device that can be used to extract information from cell phones belonging to motorists stopped for minor traffic violations. A US Department of Justice test of the CelleBrite UFED used by Michigan police found the device could grab all of the photos and video off of an iPhone within one-and-a-half minutes. The device works with 3000 different phone models and can even defeat password protections.

Submission + - Oneiric Ocelot (Ubuntu 11.10) Alpha 3 Review (

sfcrazy writes: No one reviews an alpha, but we do. The aim of this review is not to 'test' the upcoming version of Ubuntu, but to see what's new and what's improved. One of the most notable features are the changes made to the notification bar or the Indicator menu. It now shows available updates and printers connected to the PC along with bluetooth and start-up applications. Ubuntu 11.10 is using the latest verion of Gnome. It is running on current unstable version (3.1.4) and is on its way to GNOME 3.2. So, you get all the goodies of Gnome 3 with familiar and more stable Unity Shell instead of Gnome 3 shell.

Submission + - SPAM: The expense of Freedom

AgnusSungatLCwLP writes: The cost of democratic process possesses skyrocketed. By many estimations, your future 2012 political election will cost pretty much seven billion. Everything that income will likely be applyed directly into marketing prospects plus information towards United states citizens.
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"Consider a spherical bear, in simple harmonic motion..." -- Professor in the UCB physics department