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Comment Re:Frist Psot (Score 1) 323 323

http://xkcd.com/1357/

Randal Monroe pretty much has this to say about the "freedom of speech" argument: "... but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you're saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it's not literally illegal to express ."

I will never take an argument like yours seriously ever again. I will defend free speech, but I will not side with folks who use it to be jerks, which is what cyberbullying is.

Comment Re:Because it works (Score 2) 860 860

This will be one of the few times you'll hear this, but Microsoft did too good a job creating XP.

Correction: They did a good job *FIXING* Windows XP.

If you recall the "instant infection" days where you couldn't install XP and run updates without getting infected. I had a people I helped over the phone who followed the procedure:
1. Install XP
2. Download the SP2 ISO
3. Burn the ISO to disk
4. Start over because they were compromised while downloading the ISO.
5. Install XP, then SP2 via CD.

If I was able to get them a CD I would, but many of my friends where college were in different states, or even different countries, and this was quicker than waiting for a CD in the mail.

Music

Student Orchestra Performs Music With iPhones 65 65

A course at the University of Michigan ends with a live concert featuring students using iPhones as instruments. “Building a Mobile Phone Ensemble“ teaches students to code musical instruments for the iPhone, using the Apple-provided software-development kit. Georg Essl, assistant professor of computer science and music, says, "What’s interesting is we blend the whole process. We start from nothing. We teach the programming of iPhones for multimedia stuff, and then we teach students to build their own instruments.”
The Almighty Buck

EA Flip-Flops On Battlefield: Heroes Pricing, Fans Angry 221 221

An anonymous reader writes "Ben Kuchera from Ars Technica is reporting that EA/DICE has substantially changed the game model of Battlefield: Heroes, increasing the cost of weapons in Valor Points (the in-game currency that you earn by playing) to levels that even hardcore players cannot afford, and making them available in BattleFunds (the in-game currency that you buy with real money). Other consumables in the game, such as bandages to heal the players, suffered the same fate, turning the game into a subscription or pay-to-play model if players want to remain competitive. This goes against the creators' earlier stated objectives of not providing combat advantage to paying customers. Ben Cousins, from EA/DICE, argued, 'We also frankly wanted to make buying Battlefunds more appealing. We have wages to pay here in the Heroes team and in order to keep a team large enough to make new free content like maps and other game features we need to increase the amount of BF that people buy. Battlefield Heroes is a business at the end of the day and for a company like EA who recently laid off 16% of their workforce, we need to keep an eye on the accounts and make sure we are doing our bit for the company.' The official forums discussion thread is full of angry responses from upset users, who feel this change is a betrayal of the original stated objectives of the game."
Google

Submission + - Google Voice transcribed voicemail + audio leaked-> 1 1

Da w00t writes: If you search on google for site:www.google.com/voice/fm/*, you'll get a list of recorded voicemail messages from the Google Voice service. Unfortunately, there appears to be little to no security besides the expectation that the URLs wouldn't get indexed, and become public :(
Link to Original Source
Government

Diebold Admits Flaw In Voting Software 281 281

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "At a public hearing in California, Diebold's western region manager has admitted that the audit log system on current versions of Premier Election Solutions' (formerly Diebold's) electronic voting and tabulating systems — used in some 34 states across the nation — fails to record the wholesale deletion of ballots, even when ballots are deleted on the same day as an election. An election system's audit logs are meant to record all activity during the system's actual counting of ballots, so that later examiners may determine, with certainty, whether any fraudulent or mistaken activity had occurred during the count. Diebold's software fails to do that, as has recently been discovered by Election Integrity advocates in Humboldt County, CA, and then confirmed by the CA Secretary of State. The flaws, built into the system for more than a decade, are in serious violation of federal voting system certification standards."
Security

Can You Trust Anti-Virus Rankings? 258 258

Slatterz writes "It seems nobody can agree on a universal set of tests for rating anti-virus software, with Eugene Kaspersky the latest to weigh in on the topic, criticizing the well-known Virus Bulletin 100. Kaspersky is one of several big anti-virus brands to fall foul of the VB100 tests, reportedly failing to pass a recent test of security software on Windows Server 2008, along with F-Secure and Computer Associates. At Kaspersky, bloggers have pointed out that they don't focus on detecting PoCs, calling it a 'dead end,' and saying their anti-virus database focuses on 'real threats and exploits.' 'I don't want to say it's rubbish,' Kaspersky told PC Authority. 'But the security experts don't pay attention to these tests. It doesn't reflect the real level of protection.'"

It's great to be smart 'cause then you know stuff.

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