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Comment: Re:x/0 does not equal 0. (Score 1) 1066 1066

If you have 1 apple and no people then no division takes place. The answer is not 0 slices it's "no process completed". The answer is not "no one gets the apple" because there aren't any "ones" in the system to not get the apple, there is no solution other than to scream.
The problem is you don't understand how to properly express the real world in mathematical or algorithmic terms.

Medicine

Researchers Claim a Few Cat Videos Per Day Helps Keep the Doctor Away 59 59

bigwophh writes: A study published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior suggests that watching videos of cats may be good for your health. The study pinged nearly 7,000 people and asked them how viewing cat videos affected their moods. Of those surveyed, over a third (36 percent) described themselves as a "cat person" and nearly two-thirds (60 percent) said they have an affinity for both dogs and cats. Survey subjects noted less tendencies towards feeling anxious, sad, or annoyed after watching cat videos, including times when they viewed the videos while at work or trying to study. They also reported feeling more energetic and more positive afterwards. There may have been some guilt from putting off work or studying to watch Internet videos, but the amusement they got from seeing the antics of cats more than made up for it.

Comment: Re:oxymoron (Score 1) 424 424

The OP said he knew about literal string search and didn't want that, he wants hits in line with his context. "They try very hard to present me with what they think I'm searching for instead of what I'm actually searching for."
So he doesn't want what they think he wants and he doesn't want "everything". How does he suppose the search engine will know what he wants?

Comment: oxymoron (Score 1) 424 424

You want a search engine that knows what you meant by "2000s" and doesn't just return simple string matches, but you don't want that same engine to "think" for you. How would that look to you for any arbitrary search?
How is the search engine supposed to have any context of what you want without more information?

"Peanut butter" What do you want back, places that make it, sell it, grow the peanuts, ship it, recipes, allergies, how to make it stick to people's skin, using it to get pills down your dog's throat? Is there band called peanut butter, an album, song, artist, patinting, place?

There's no "simple" search you could use that wound't require the search engine to "think" for you. A full an complete set of search parameters is needed to get to what YOU want.

Comment: Computers got faster over ten years... (Score 1) 147 147

I don't see how they controlled for equipment getting faster. A computer in 2004 was probably a ~3Ghz Pentium 4 with a 800MHz bus and 1Gb of RAM. Now you have an i5 or i7 with an SSD that's probably 10 times faster. People just don't wait that long for their computer anymore.

(I miss the good old days when a print job got you a 15-20 minute break.)

Comment: Re:Just get rid of it (Score 1) 314 314

Why is it the "cranks" are all asking for scientific study or proof and the "sane" ones are all saying "trust we know it works, because we know" and quoting each other in support?

Do you know that for that $63,000 a year you could provide fluoride rinse or tablets to every at-risk kid in a population about 3x the size served by municipal water fluoridation? The rinses and tables have been studied and proven effective and they all use sodium fluoride.

Comment: Re:This is going to be fun (Score -1, Troll) 314 314

As with any public issue there are conspiracy theorists out there. In this particular case when you start digging you find many reasons to ban fluordation of water supplies an almost 0 evidence to support it, beyond the myths you've been told since a child.

Comment: Just get rid of it (Score 3, Informative) 314 314

Fluoride in water always sounds good to people who want "better smiles" but it's 99% a waste of the money spent:

1. The version of fluoride they put in the water (Hexafluorosilicic acid) is not shown to help with dental decay issues. Sodium Fluoride is the chemical the ADA studies and recommends for toothpaste and dental products.

2. Hexafluorosilicic acid is a product manufactured from industrial waste in the aluminum industry and is considered a toxic substance. If industry hadn't conned municipalities in to putting it in the water supply as a "fluoride source" it would cost them a good chunk of change to dispose of the stuff. (Look up ALCOA and fluoride).

3. Consumption of unfiltered tap water, I'd say, is just about zero. I know no-one that drinks any substantive quantity of tap water that the fluoride content in it would ever have any clinical effect. Almost any filter designed to remove impurities will remove the fluoride from tap water.

4. Even if people were drinking only tap water, over 95% of the water used in an average municipality is very consumed by any living thing. It washes cars, waters lawns, bathes people, flushes toilets, cools industrial equipment, etc.

5. When I had this discussion with my town a few years ago asking them to provide numbers they told my it cost $63,000 a year in product and personnel to run the fluoridation system for 29.5 million gallons of potable water. That sounds like very little, .2 cents ($.002) per thousand gallons or an average of about $.30 per family per month. Sure when you make the numbers small it doesn't look like much, but think about what $63,000 a year gets if directed an other programs in a town. Another teacher or two? Extended library hours on the weekends? A new after school program?

6. No-one, I mean I searched hard, has studied the rate of change in a community pre and post fluoridation of tap water since an initial study of Grand Rapids and Muskegon in 1945. A study that was ended prematurely but touted as a success anyway despite its very unscientific lack of compensating for outside factors not related to the study itself and the "control" changing programs during the study.

7. The Grand Rapids "study" was based upon Sodium Fluoride, which again is not what we put in the water today. So even if the result was positive the hexafluorosilicic acid used today has never been studied for prevention of tooth decay in municipal water supplies and is a very different chemical compound just like Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide are very different chemicals. Search for

8. There is no version of any type of fluoride that is indicated by the FDA for the prevention of tooth decay. The municipal water companies are adding an non-FDA approved and unregulated drug to our water supply. The other substance added to water supplies (chlorine to be simple) is approved by the FDA for water and food sanitation.

As you can see, there is simply no supporting truth to the argument that fluoride in municipal water prevents tooth decay. It does cost a significant amount of money, and almost no-one drinks the fluoridated water anyway.

Do your own research. You will come to the same conclusion: municipal water fluoridation is based on lies, it's a waste of money, it doesn't work and it may actually cause harm to public health.

Comment: These articles miss a very important point... (Score 1) 448 448

Who says a channel has to charge? TBS costs cable companies $.63 a month per subscriber, bringing in $731 million a year for 96,700 homes. ESPN is $5.75 a month per subscriber in 94,000 homes.

I'd pay $1 a month for TBS. Some channels wouldn't have to charge. QVC? That's just a big infomercial. Golf? Offer it for free.

It looks like we may get choices soon: Cable Under Fire: Plunge in Ratings Could Spell Trouble for Top Nets

Comment: Re:Taxpayer's Dilemma (Score 3, Insightful) 213 213

How much in taxes do you think you paid last year? $1k? $5k? $50k?

How much of the Interstate that you use daily will that pay for?

Maybe 1/2 an inch of the interstate.

Whine to us all about how government is raping you...

while you enjoy electricity, navigable waterways, the internet, safe food, police protection, fire protection, libraries, schools, parks, national forests, etc.

Comment: Re:Taxpayer's Dilemma (Score 2) 213 213

>You are assuming a perfect world where taxes are used efficiently, whereas most western government have rather low bang-for-the-buck. At the end of the day, what really happen is more of the realm of "Everyone pays taxes, but infrastructures still sucks".

Are you on the Internet in America right now?

If so, then the government infrastructure is working quite well. Last time I checked, we had relatively clean water and air, reliable utilities, navigable waterways, weren't being invaded by some foreign army, and have roads from one end of the country to another.

This notion that government is largely errant and irresponsible doesn't jive with reality. The exception does not prove the rule.

Comment: Re:TIt-for-tat fallacy (Score 1) 213 213

>What's unrealistic is believing one strategy is always favored by evolution. Evolution tries everything, so you get all strategies tried.

Actually if you read the study, their conclusion is, the aberrations in the cooperation between the parties is the result of their desire to "change the game" and avoid being put in scenarios where there is no clear winning choice.

Comment: Re:Chat is terrible hellscape (Score 1) 79 79

Now we're seeing the slow death of IRC too at the hands of better but more proprietary user experiences being offered by Skype and Slack.

And it's easy to see why too. The proprietary chat tools out there like Slack are absolutely incredible user experiences.

If IRC and XMPP are ever going to be competitive with the new proprietary guys in town, it needs to get competitive on the usability front.

I think Slack is built on IRC, I use a bouncer and whatever IRC client I have handy to connect to our work Slack.

IRCCloud is putting a pretty face on IRC, if they would offer the Slack integrations they could be a real competitor.

Real computer scientists don't program in assembler. They don't write in anything less portable than a number two pencil.

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