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Comment: Re:Taxpayer's Dilemma (Score 3, Insightful) 213

by mabu (#48494631) Attached to: Game Theory Analysis Shows How Evolution Favors Cooperation's Collapse

How much in taxes do you think you paid last year? $1k? $5k? $50k?

How much of the Interstate that you use daily will that pay for?

Maybe 1/2 an inch of the interstate.

Whine to us all about how government is raping you...

while you enjoy electricity, navigable waterways, the internet, safe food, police protection, fire protection, libraries, schools, parks, national forests, etc.

Comment: Re:Taxpayer's Dilemma (Score 2) 213

by mabu (#48494605) Attached to: Game Theory Analysis Shows How Evolution Favors Cooperation's Collapse

>You are assuming a perfect world where taxes are used efficiently, whereas most western government have rather low bang-for-the-buck. At the end of the day, what really happen is more of the realm of "Everyone pays taxes, but infrastructures still sucks".

Are you on the Internet in America right now?

If so, then the government infrastructure is working quite well. Last time I checked, we had relatively clean water and air, reliable utilities, navigable waterways, weren't being invaded by some foreign army, and have roads from one end of the country to another.

This notion that government is largely errant and irresponsible doesn't jive with reality. The exception does not prove the rule.

Comment: Re:TIt-for-tat fallacy (Score 1) 213

by mabu (#48494587) Attached to: Game Theory Analysis Shows How Evolution Favors Cooperation's Collapse

>What's unrealistic is believing one strategy is always favored by evolution. Evolution tries everything, so you get all strategies tried.

Actually if you read the study, their conclusion is, the aberrations in the cooperation between the parties is the result of their desire to "change the game" and avoid being put in scenarios where there is no clear winning choice.

Comment: Re:Chat is terrible hellscape (Score 1) 79

by gozar (#48460567) Attached to: Slack Now Letting Employers Tap Workers' Private Chats

Now we're seeing the slow death of IRC too at the hands of better but more proprietary user experiences being offered by Skype and Slack.

And it's easy to see why too. The proprietary chat tools out there like Slack are absolutely incredible user experiences.

If IRC and XMPP are ever going to be competitive with the new proprietary guys in town, it needs to get competitive on the usability front.

I think Slack is built on IRC, I use a bouncer and whatever IRC client I have handy to connect to our work Slack.

IRCCloud is putting a pretty face on IRC, if they would offer the Slack integrations they could be a real competitor.

Comment: I learned to program on PLATO (Score 3, Informative) 134

I learned to program on PLATO. It was an AMAZING system. In addition to supporting a variety of development environments, their system used a proprietary language called TUTOR. A good bit of networking technology today is derivative of this amazing system. I wasn't rich, although I noted a lot of kids who had access to PLATO tended to be children of CEOs and such. My parents worked at a college that had a grant to have the terminals available. The games on the system were also amazing.

As a programmer, PLATO was a great example of the "cloud"-type systems that will eventually become standard.. what Google is doing and Adobe is now proposing was done in the 70s at Plato, with centrally-hosted apps that routinely are updated automatically. As developers we could put in requests for program features and see them reflected in newer versions of the API. 512x512 resolution, touch sensitive screens, multi-player, real-time games between people all over the world..... in the 70s.

By the way, the original PLATO system has been ported and is running over TCP/IP. If you're willing to donate to the project, they have been known to grant access to people wanting to experience what it was like. See: http://www.cyber1.org/

By the way if anyone has the archive of the PLATO game 0drygulch.. PLEASE contact them... we've been dying to find that code and put it online.

Comment: This is really about controling the internet (Score 5, Informative) 571

by argoff (#48211713) Attached to: The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

This isn't about sexual harassment, but controlling the internet, and implicitly people in general. A lot of the powers that be have decided that, like other forms of media, they need to sanitize it in the name of control. (even with games, google gamergate) They want a name and an ID behind every post, they want to create "accountability". They gleefully ignore the fact that any woman, gay person, person of color, persecuted minority can take on an anon alias and argue their beliefs, do their work on merit alone. Seriously, how do we even know that Satoshi, the bitcoin creator, isn't a black lesbian? The internet frees productive people from race and gender in a way that before was never even remotely possible.

So maybe, just maybe, the people who want to make it an issue now, are the doing it not because of some high morality, but because they are discovering they can't compete on merit. But the issue is way deeper that that. In today's world, a lot of media and games are controlled via copyright, but copyrights by their very nature require centralized control by those who control them to work. Yet the internet is doing just the opposite, it is moving into the direction of decentralized control, threatening a lot of people, who happen to have a lot of money.

Comment: taxes are theft (Score 1) 259

by argoff (#48156637) Attached to: "Double Irish" Tax Loophole Used By US Companies To Be Closed

After reading the comments here, it's surprising how few people seem to understand that taxes are just theft. Yeah yeah yeah, I know the government provides public "services", but that's all just a pretext to justify stealing from people. It's pathetic when people think these programs are about helping them.

If the mafia went from business to business extorting money from people, and one of the business people found a way out of it via a technicality. That is not a bad thing. And neither is it getting out from under the thumb of government criminals either. It amazes me how easy it is to see all the evil and crap done by the government, yet people still want to give them money. It's like there is some kind of disconnect.

If a slave escaped from the plantation, would people go off and say that is evil because the master will just make the other slaves work harder ... yet this is the exact kind of logic people use when they see others escape taxes. The gov will take more from us! Less money for our programs! The Mexican mafia has charity programs too, do you think they're doing it just because they are nice guys?

The state is already taking the max they can, and giving back the least they can get away with to justify themselves. People escaping them will not make things worse for us, but instead create more opportunity out there for us to escape too as well.

Comment: Re:Boeing bought more politicians. (Score 1) 127

Leaving out Boeing would be budget suicide for NASA.

No one should be left out because there should be no contract. Instead, NASA should be fostering a spot market for launches. They should have a separate bid for each launch: "We want X satellite in Y orbit, and insured for Z dollars." Then give the launch to the lowest bidder. That way each company can work continuously to cut costs and improve services, knowing that if they leapfrog the competition, they can win the next launch, instead of being locked out for years.

That is not feesable. It take years to be trained to fly in a spaceship - whether the lifting body like the Shuttle or Dream Chaser, or a capsule such as Soyuz, CST-100, or Dragon V2. You have to build not only the rocket, but a tower to carry the crew to the top of the rocket along with an arm to get the astronauts into the vehicle (which is not compatible/spacecraft). Escape systems need to be installed. It's very expensive, and it would never be built without assurance that the demand is there. At this time, there is no market for launches except from NASA or ESA. Cosmonauts would ride Russian spacecraft, Indians and Chinese are developing their own systems, etc. The public demand is too little at this time. Without a long-term contract, NASA is not enough for your proposal.

Comment: Re:Not so sure it's harmless (Score 3, Informative) 251

by mabu (#47760995) Attached to: TechCentral Scams Call Center Scammers

I got a call two days ago from these people. I strung them along until they gave me a web address to go to in order to download some software and run it on my computer. Then while they were expecting me to do that, I ran a WHOIS on the host and IP, found out who was hosting them (it turned out to be an American company) and I contacted their abuse team and reported the site as being fradulent. 24 hours later, their web site was shut down.

It also helps when you contact their abuse department, that you tell them you work for an antivirus company and you're going to add the IP address of the site to your blacklist. In many cases, there are hundreds if not thousands of web sites operating from the same IP. They will take quick action rather than have one bad customer cause 900 other customer sites to not be accessible.

Comment: Different ages of development (Score 5, Insightful) 120

by mabu (#47760885) Attached to: The Grumpy Programmer has Advice for Young Computer Workers (Video)

I am not sure there's much advice us older programmers can give new developers because the industry is a lot different now.

In the old days we were often tasked with solving a problem, and we were more-often free to use whatever tools and technology were best, and we also thought of development environments as tools, which we could switch out if the application required something different. We also did all our own testing. I recently worked with a younger programmer on a project and it was miserable. He couldn't give me 20 lines of code that didn't have a bug in it, because he was dependent upon having some QA person test his work and an IDE that would hilight every mistake.

Nowadays there is so much abstraction going on in programming, people don't really seem like they're programming as much as they're using some sort of GUI development tool and plodding through innumerable amounts of API documentation and going on witch-hunts to try and figure out why something that's documented to work, doesn't actually work. I remember a big Oracle project I was on where my software wouldn't work properly and I couldn't figure out why. It took me several months of bitching on usenet to finally get a rep within Oracle contact me privately and tell me I wasn't crazy, they knew about the bug and just weren't acknowledging it. In the old days, there wasn't as much of that going on. Programming was simpler and less bureaucratic.

Comment: Re:Incredibly wise advice (Score 1) 120

by mabu (#47760811) Attached to: The Grumpy Programmer has Advice for Young Computer Workers (Video)

I think the reason there's no job security in programming is because basically, nobody's really doing any "programming" these days.

Modern programmers know less about machines and languages than they do APIs and UIs. Everything is so object-oriented and encapsulated, and there are so many square pegs developers are asked to fit into round holes, they're not really designing stuff as much as working on an assembly line sticking various parts-pieces together with no real sense of oversight of the big picture.

Comment: cheap (Score 1) 216

by gerardrj (#47637555) Attached to: NFL Fights To Save TV Blackout Rule Despite $9 Billion Revenue

So the consumers love their team so much they always want to watch the team play. They just don't want to pay for tickets or pay for the TV channel to watch.
Maybe it is time for the major league sports teams to just give in and make watching their games completely free and supported by advertising. I mean we're pretty far along already. Adverts on the screen all the time, swooshing adverts on the screen intermittently, adverts between plays, commercials, logos all over the field, etc.
Let's just for for the gusto... "Frito Lay presents the snapping the ball the quarterback, as he fades back in the team's signature Cadillac move. He Snickers tosses the ball to the wide receiver who's catch is sponsored by Taco Bell and runs to the Minute Maid mid-field where he's taken down by Office Max's linebacker.

Look.. the teams in cities and states have 0 to do with the city or state any more, the players are from all over the world, training camps are in another part of the county and they'd relocate for a deal that made them 2% more money. The stadiums are owned by the team and they sell the naming rights to the highest bidder.
Just go full out commercial with this stupid professional games stuff.

It isn't easy being the parent of a six-year-old. However, it's a pretty small price to pay for having somebody around the house who understands computers.

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