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Comment: Re:Won't work. (Score 3, Interesting) 151

by ohms (#43564955) Attached to: Kenya Police: Our Fake Bomb Detectors Are Real
Firstly, there isn't much different between believing in sympathetic magic/possession by evil spirits and the belief in a supreme being who directs our fate every day. My point? Everywhere in the world, you'll find "a people" who believe in otherworldly crap. Secondly, if you think the police spokesman firmly believes the bomb tthing works, then you're sorely mistaken. This is probably what happened (trust me, I have first hand information on this kind of stuff): 1. The British dude was able to get in contact with someone holding some Kenya government checkbook. 2. The British dude worked out a mutually beneficial trade. Say, allocate $60,000 for each dud, pay the Briton $40,000, and have the facilitator get the $20,000 kickback. 3. ?????? 4. PROFIT!!! Really, you're naïve to think that someone bought the scanner purely on its technical merits, without regard to how much money could be had from kickbacks.

Comment: Try Borderlands 2 (Score 1) 550

by ohms (#42639227) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do I Get My Spouse To Start Gaming With Me?
It has a very decent co-op mode, and adapts well to novice and hard-core gamers alike. Unlike many games, the storyline isn't repetitive/dull and is varied and engaging enough to keep at it for a while, with the main storyline missions and other optional missions to help build up cash and experience. So far, that's the only game that my girlfriend has played with me for more than 30 minutes (we play a lot of Borderlands, often at her insistence).

Comment: Re:Easier and cheaper ways to do that. (Score 1) 124

by ohms (#39752499) Attached to: Facebook, Instagram, Ben Bernanke: Thank You For the New Tech Bubble

Or you dump 1/10th of that money ($100 million) into creating your own app that does the exact same thing and is tied to Facebook.

And you've saved $900 million. Which can be used for other projects or acquisitions.

How many people have tried this strategy and succeeded. "Oh, Nimblesoft has made this awesome app, let's throw in a chunk of money at the problem, put in some really smart guys, and see if we can get something as successful". I don't even need to quote some product examples that were the brainchild of this noble, yet ill-informed idea. Facebook not so much purchased Instagram as they purchased the brand identity and its ecosystem. That imo takes way more to develop than just $100 million. So, saying that they'd have saved $900 million, without looking at the app dev time, manpower, and the risks of it not even being successful in the first place is a bit simplistic.

Comment: Re:Good for him (Score 1) 118

by ohms (#39723999) Attached to: Avian Flu Researcher Plans to Defy Dutch Ban On Publishing Paper
Your argument is a bit of a strawman. Nowhere did AdrianKemp imply that the flight pioneers were responsible for 9/11. Also, last time I heard, I thought they were trying to develop the vaccine for it before considering releasing it to the masses. In this case, the cost of releasing it without having any safeguards against its misuse in my opinion greatly outweighs the benefits of having this research in the public domain, You cannot say the same for airplanes; the CBA for each innovation is quite different.

Comment: I'd rather keep my dignity (Score 1) 1303

by ohms (#38783259) Attached to: How the US Lost Out On iPhone Work

recount the time Apple redesigned the iPhone's screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company's dormitories, and then each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames.

So, with the glee of a 8 yr old girl who just found a pony under the Christmas tree, this Apple exec gushes about how easy and flexible it was to house workers in sardine cans, rouse them from a probably short nap anyway, command them to the assembly line and order them to stand there doing repetitive, mind numbing tasks for 12 hours. Pay of the day? 31 cents an hour. But yea, competition and capitalism is good you say. If they don't want to do it, then hundreds of other Chinese, Taiwanese, other South Asian immigrants would gladly take their spot, right? Well I dunno about you, but I consider the US extremely luck in that for the most part, you don't have to be forced to sleep in barracks, be called to work at anytime your employer chooses, and be subjected to low-paying highly boring jobs. Then again, it's turning this way for some people. I'd rather save my dignity and live in relative poverty (I've already done so for a big chunk of my life, and it wasn't too intolerable) than succumb to the machinery of this misguided capitalist enterprise.

Comment: Re:Localization factor (Score 1) 383

by ohms (#38692964) Attached to: Google Caught Misbehaving By Kenyan Startup
How did this devolve from a discussion on the unethical practices perpetrated by a Google (yes, Google), to a discussion of how corrupt the system is. The stuff google did is orthogonal to the corrupt culture. Not, the blame is shifting from that behemoth to "ok Kenya is corrupt". This to me seems like some folks over here are trying to justify Google's actions, or lessen the ethical implications that they carry.

When the weight of the paperwork equals the weight of the plane, the plane will fly. -- Donald Douglas

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