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Comment Re:I really just don't get it. (Score 0, Troll) 161

I see you dont know ANYTHING about the revolutionary war.

1776 was a bunch of rich people convincing the poor to fight for them. George washington was just pissed his riches were being taxed along with all the other "founding fathers" It was a fantastic job of convincing most oft he citizens to fight for "freedom" that only the richest men enjoyed and they shovelled that " you can be too" BS down their throats to help convince parents to send their kids to die for the rich guys.

Tea partiers don' know anything about american history other than the propaganda crap taught in high-school. It's why you guys are not taken seriously.

The biggest difference, back then the rich guys had the balls to actually be near the front lines and even on them. Today our country is ran by 100% cowards.

Cellphones

Smartphone Malware Planted In Popular Apps Pre-sale 40

An anonymous reader writes with news from The Stack that makes it a little harder to scoff at malware on phones as being largely the fruit of dodgy sideloaded software, game cracks, et cetera. They report that even phones marketed as brand new, from well-known brands like Lenovo and Xiaomi, have been tampered with and "infected prior to sale with intelligent malware disguised in popular apps such as Facebook." (To U.S. buyers, those makers may be slightly obscure as cellphone vendors; the scheme this article addresses involves handsets sold by vendors in Europe and Asia, involving more than 20 different handset types.)

Comment Re:And? (Score 1) 184

A lot of things come at no cost though. I find it amazing how many people for example will spend a fortune on their graphics card, motherboard, processor, ram, hard drives, etc... but then run it with a cheapo power supply.

Let's say that you're one of those (probably the majority) that leaves their computer on 24/7. Let's say your gaming computer's average power consumption, between idling and heavy usage, is maybe 200W. Let's say the power supply lasts an average 3 years. Let's say that the difference between a cheapo 75% efficient power supply and an excellent 95% efficient supply is $50. Then the better supply saves 40W on average, or 1051 kWh over its lifespan. At an average US electricity price of, what, 12 cents per kWh, that's a savings of $126. You not only help the environment, but you easily save yourself money.

It's not just power supplies that matter - the same logic can be applied to processors, graphics cards, and other hardware as well. Always check the power consumption - not just for the environment, but for your pocketbook as well. Often it saves money to spend more upfront.

Comment Re:Not far enough. (Score 1) 72

IMHO, countries that care about pollution should set up a Pollution-Added Tax (PAT), equivalent to VAT, replacing their current patchwork of pollution regulations. Since VAT is already clearly in compliance with WTO rules (given that it exists), PAT should be as well. Just like how VAT works by taxing products at each stage of adding value to them during manufacture, PAT would tax them by the embodied pollution in their manufacture during that stage (plus any "delayed" pollution released when the product is consumed). And like VAT, PAT goods for export would receive a full tax rebate, and goods for import from non-PAT states would be taxed on entry.

The main point is that states with weaker pollution regulations cannot gain an unfair economic advantage over states with stronger pollution regulations. Thus it encourages even non-member-states to tighten their regulations.

Comment Re:Sanctioning NSA/FBI for spying all? (Score 2) 72

Things like Stuxnet is not at all what the person was talking about. They're talking about hacks to try to embarrass people or steal corporate secrets. Stuxnet was to take down a nuclear program, which is clearly a geopolitical, not industrial, goal.

My personal opinion: countries breaking into each other's governments or trying in general to gather/use classic "spying" data for geopolitical purposes is fair game. State-sponsored industrial espionage is not. That said, even in the first case, one runs the risk of uncontrolled escalation, so it's important for all sides to keep themselves in check and mutually agree to ratchet down the activity from time to time, for everyone's sake.

Also: it probably hasn't gotten past the US that it's in an advantageous state right now. Russia hasn't been more vulnerable in a long time, and now even China's star has taken a pounding in the market. US industry is benefiting from cheap thermal energy prices due to low cost shale gas. And Europe is probably going to be on the US's side in all of this.

Comment Re:another rich asshole (Score 1) 772

How about give the fucking money to someone like ME who has lived in poverty pretty much my whole life!? I'd buy my way out of this shitty country (USA) and into Europe.

As someone that could be considered a nomad and has moved countries, you don't need much money to move. You can even move regularly if you wanted. You have to be willing to travel and move light though. It's also going to be out of your comfort zone, because you would need to go ahead with a plan that has limited visibility in the details behind it.

Then I'd invest some of the money in a permanent residence (probably in Germany)

Get a job in Germany, get a credit card, pay off your monthly expenses on the credit card, pay off the credit card every month (build up your credit rating for four years), save up for a deposit (for four years), get a mortgage for your house. These are things you can do.

'd go to college (its free there)

Wrong, it's public universities and enrolment, administrative fees are not free. That said, it would likely cost for food, rent etc. about 10,000 Euro a year. You cannot make use of the welfare system while studying. Above undergraduate qualifications, you have to meet even more conditions to avoid necessity to pay a variety of fees.

Comment Re:Work on other goals (Score 1) 772

I honestly enjoy my work, but I have shown myself that I can be even happier not working just fine for a pretty long stretch. If I could have 3 months off a year I could stop bumping into burnout so often. My real fear is that by time I can retire, or at least slow down the hamster wheel I am stuck on, I will not be able to physically do the things I really enjoy anymore.

As I prepare to take my weekly flight out for work, this is a fear that I think about every week.

Comment Re:"Denali" = anagram for "Denial" (Score 1) 382

I don't have a very clean way - I usually do egrep "^......$" /usr/share/dict/words (with the number of dots matching the length of the word) and then pipe it into a series of other greps - for example for two "r"s I'd do egrep -i "r.*r" while for one d I'd just use grep -i "d". There's probably a better way.

Comment Minecraft? Secret? Huh? (Score 1) 772

The dude was head of a company that made one of the top-selling software packages of all time. He sold the company to Microsoft.

When someone googles your name and they get "minecraft creator sells to MS for $2BN", there is no way to not tell people.

Furthermore, when you're worth that kind of money, you *have* to change your lifestyle for personal safety.

Loan-department manager: "There isn't any fine print. At these interest rates, we don't need it."

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