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Comment: Re:The issue is not about compliance with the law (Score 5, Informative) 94

by nusuth (#46566571) Attached to: Turkish Finance Minister Defends Twitter Ban

The situation in Turkey is not just another free speech banning law, making law maker and enforcers looking ridiculous. Not at all. There is a mindbogglingly huge corruption scandal going on. The prosecutors were removed from the case, police were ordered not to obey court orders, tens of thousands of civil servants have been relocated etc to stop the investigation. The extend and the number are both unbelievable, so I will leave it to look them up yourself (you would never believe an anonymous source on internet talking about 12 digits, would you?)

Now, when it became apparent that the prime minister had no intention to actually let courts do their job, the prosecutors (quite unlawfully) started leaking dozens of voice recordings of their evidence. So far we have learned that Mr. Prime Minister ordering newspapers what not to press, ordering his son to move hundreds of millions of dollars from his house, selling valuable land to his friendly businessmen, using tax law to crush unfriendly businessmen, ordering the police to increase tension during Gezi movement etc. Tomorrow is the big day. It is said that the PM will not be able to keep his post no matter what after the recording posted on 25th of March. The leaked tapes so far has been uncovered PM's behavior so unconstitutional and immoral that I cannot image what could possibly be so much bigger. The expectation is that either PM's ordering assassination of a opposition leader or he having sex with a minor. Whatever it is, it got PM panicked. This is what got actually twitter banned. There is a cover story, but it is so hastily constructed that *the cover story itself is unlawful.* The story is that a court banned twitter on for not complying, a court which is not authorized to do so, and a court which denies doing/trying to do so.

So whatever your ideas on different lands having different customs and laws, this is not the event to discuss them. Twitter ban in Turkey is 100% wrong.

Comment: Re:Don't go to college, it's clearly not for you (Score 1) 384

by nusuth (#45962371) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Can I Improve My Memory For Study?

In the book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell summarizes a series of research which seems to prove that while having enough intelligence for a particular task is a must to succeed in that task, having additional IQ makes next to no difference. This is true for at all levels of complexity of tasks (from winning a Nobel to keeping a daily job) inspected. Being a bright and otherwise nondescript person I am, I would love to see some research contradicting the claim. I suspect there is none.

Comment: Re:Inventor of the Lazy Gun (Score 2) 141

by nusuth (#43959783) Attached to: Iain Banks Dies of Cancer At 59

I strongly disagree. The real SF element in the book is what if we will not have access to stars? What if we improve our technology to magic like levels but fail to find new frontiers? It is probably the most insightful and most relevant SF book he has ever written. Banks puts the planetary system in isolation but having stars just 4 light years away is no guarantee that we will ever reach them. The premise is species-survival level important.

As for "magical" items, like lazy gun, they serve their purpose best when there are no plausible explanations to their inner workings. They illustrate the point of being made by much advanced technological level characters' better if they make less sense. His choice of extreme cartoonishness, rather than SF classic technobabble is a brilliant invention.

The adventure is great too. A real page turner, if you don't stop to think about implications.

Comment: Re:Neil deGrasse Tyson (Score 1) 520

by nusuth (#43072927) Attached to: Neil deGrasse Tyson On How To Stop a Meteor Hitting the Earth

Pushing gently over a long time, without any contact is the idea. For rocky asteroids known to be structurally sound, non-contacting may not be important. But pushing with exhaust without landing is a very inefficient idea. To keep spacecraft same distance from the asteroid, you have to waste half of your propellant in the opposite direction.

Comment: Re:Neil deGrasse Tyson (Score 1) 520

by nusuth (#43063407) Attached to: Neil deGrasse Tyson On How To Stop a Meteor Hitting the Earth

The escape velocities of many asteroids are very low and the exhaust velocity for high Isp engines are very high. The difference is at least 100 fold. For a net momentum change, it would be enough to not aim exhaust directly to the asteroid. The gravitational capture of propellant is impossible. No special diversion mechanisms are necessary.

Comment: Re:I don't get it. (Score 1) 1313

by nusuth (#42970689) Attached to: US CEO Says French Workers Have Three-Hour Work Day

I think the issue is when you feel that you deserve to work a couple hours a day (or week) and get paid more than other people who work for 10s of hours a week (or day) and be paid the same amount.

I own a business. I'm in the business of selling my labor. Therefore, I'm going to maximize MY profits. That means getting paid as much as I can for as little work as possible. If business owners shouldn't be stigmatized for being greedy assholes, then workers shouldn't be stigmatized for being lazy assholes.

This double standard has to go.

In business, you don't maximize profits by having less of them. Getting paid as much as you can for a particular work is a proper business goal, getting it for as little work as possible is just plain laziness.

Comment: Re:Surprise (Score 2) 468

by nusuth (#42709919) Attached to: Norwegian Study: Global Warming Less Severe Than Feared

If most scientists agreed that world was flat, and you were to somehow decide what to do on that information, the rational course of action would have been assuming the world is flat. The rational course of action does not depend on the physical reality but on the best available information. By definition, that information is judged to be better than its rivals. Whether a theory is better than its rivals is the pertinent question, whether it is actually true is not. "The truth" cannot be known as such, as is the "actual fact."

Comment: Re:The invisible hand of the market... (Score 1) 270

by nusuth (#42536935) Attached to: Worldwide Shortage of Barium

Barium is not in short supply, although medical grade barium sulphate may be. I guess the mined baryte is never used in medical procedures, regardless of its purity when it came from the ground. Making pure barium sulphate from baryte is straightforward though. Coke, dissolve in sulfuric acid, precipitate. Rinse and repeat if higher purity is desired. Of course this adds a certain cost (precipitated barium sulphate was around 700 $/ton last I checked, in 2007) but that is peanuts for medical applications. One is using a couple hundred grams for the contrast procedure.

Comment: Re:Grow a thicker skin (Score 1) 1160

by nusuth (#41660599) Attached to: Shut Up and Play Nice: How the Western World Is Limiting Free Speech

WTF does "they demand respect even when they are in the minority." mean?

Anyway, my original point is, the problem you frame as a *muslim* behavior is actually an *eastern* behavior. Mid eastern muslims' demand for respect for their values is not limited to religion. The majority of people living in the east are not muslims anyway.

Comment: Re:Grow a thicker skin (Score 1) 1160

by nusuth (#41659733) Attached to: Shut Up and Play Nice: How the Western World Is Limiting Free Speech

Eastern culture values conformity and respect to each other (especially to elders and their beliefs) a lot more than respect for different ideas. If conformity is impossible, the eastern solution to incompatible belief systems is keeping silent about them.

I am atheist living in muslim country. I find it very difficult to defend my beliefs and not offend at the same time. If I chose to defend my beliefs it is usually seen a sign of mischief (which it in a sense is! I know I will offend people, so I can't claim not meaning ot offend.)

Comment: Re:Grow a thicker skin (Score 1) 1160

by nusuth (#41657899) Attached to: Shut Up and Play Nice: How the Western World Is Limiting Free Speech

Seriously... People have been mocking religion for thousands of years, you don't see the Jews or Christians rioting and killing people every time someone pokes fun at God or Jesus. I'm not counting the middle ages here either.. just the last 200 or so years..

Part (only part) of the problem is the western people tend not to notice that the eastern concept of "respect" is quite different from western one. Eastern people are a lot less tolerant to not being respected, especially when their shared values not being respected. One is not supposed to chant "stick and stones" if he is not/his beliefs are not being respected. If he does so, he is implicitly accepting that he/his shared values are not being worthy of respect. This is a worldview I do not share, but it is as "wrong" as you might assume. It is just different. Killing people due to your prophet not being respected is, obviously, indefensible.

Comment: Re:You forget entropy (Score 1) 432

by nusuth (#40776011) Attached to: The Nuclear Approach To Climate Change

With free energy you can just use many heat pump in a cascade until at the final pump your coolant is pressurized molten metal and your heat exchanger is a mirrored dish at 5000K (or whatever.) Your heat sink is universe. If the spectrum is right, very little of the radiated energy will heat atmosphere. The only reason we don't radiate away our heat is because radiative heat transfer is very slow at low temperatures and using high temperatures is very inefficient.

Contemptuous lights flashed flashed across the computer's console. -- Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

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