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Submission + - Top 7 Wireless Apps for Linux (madpenguin.org)

techie writes: "According to MadPenguin.org, there are a must-have Linux applications that everyone must have and they have reviewed them in quick bites. The author writes, "Assuming you have managed to find a wireless card that is working well with your Linux distribution, or perhaps you just settled for a hack-n'-hope solution with NDISWrapper, you need to settle on an application that you can use to connect to your wireless network."

Submission + - Gates: Windows 7 will "take less memory" (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: At the Windows Digital Lifestyle Consortium in Japan, Bill Gates said Windows 7 will "be lower power, take less memory, be more efficient." One Microsoft Way speculates whether Windows 7 will focus on performance, similarly to how Windows Vista focused on security.

Submission + - HP to Acquire EDS

XeviouS writes: ""According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), Hewlett-Packard (HP) is close to finalizing a deal to purchase Electronic Data Systems (EDS). If the acquisition takes place it could mean tougher competition for IBM." More info here, here and here."
Media (Apple)

Submission + - Apple settles iPod battery suit

Stony Stevenson writes: Apple has settled a lawsuit in Canada over the battery life of its iPod music player by issuing $45 store vouchers. The class-action suit was filed in June 2005 by Ines Lenzi and Bradley Waddell, who claimed that Apple had misled consumers as to the lifespan of the iPod's rechargeable battery. The judgment covers first-, second- and third-generation iPods bought before July 2004.
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Ubuntu-Powered Device Helps The Elderly

An anonymous reader writes: The guys at LinuxDevices.com have up a story on a Linux-based touch-panel device targeting elderly homecare. This product — that is named Blue Heron Network Reside@HOME — consists of a touch-based computer that at its heart runs Ubuntu Linux. This Ubuntu Linux device is controlled by the family and other caregivers where they can upload messages, pictures, and notes to guide the care receiver through their day-to-day tasks. The caregivers are able to interface with this Ubuntu box through a web-based control panel. From the article, "The goal of Reside@Home is to provide long-term independence and care for those with diminished cognitive ability, while also meeting the needs of busy unpaid care providers, says Michael Larabel, Director of Software Development at Blue Heron Network. "The system is very beneficial in keeping those with early stages of Alzheimer's and other neuro-degenerative conditions independent for as long as possible, while maintaining their traditional lifestyle and enhancing the quality of their lives," said Larabel in an email."

Submission + - Rogue Mac Application (pcpro.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: F-Secure is warning Mac users of the presence of the first "rogue application" for OS X, MacSweeper. The application purports to scan a Mac system for files that can or need to be removed, but as F-Secure notes, "it will always find something to fix/clean but the only way to do so is to buy the program". Once the software is installed, it will periodically display a popup dialog stating that the computer has been compromised and that the user needs to buy MacSweeper to remove the non-existent files.

Journal Journal: Modifying stem cell's surface steers cells where needed

Now it appears that even stem cells can come with GPS. In a groundbreaking study, Robert Sackstein, MD, PhD, and colleagues in the Department of Dermatology at the Biomedical Research Institute at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) harmlessly modified the surface of human mesenchymal stem cells (a type of adult stem cell that is the precursor of bone forming cells called osteoblasts), which directed the cel

Submission + - Techie Mistakenly Arrested on Basis of IP Address (indiatimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A Bangalore-based software engineer, Lakshmana Kailash K, was wrongly jailed for 50 days last year by the Pune police cyber cell. Lakshmana had been falsely accused of an internet crime — posting unseemly pictures on the web — and was arrested based on the internet protocol address. As it turned out, the IP address was not his. But by the time the police confirmed this and acted on it, he had already spent 50 harrowing days at the Yerwada Jail with hardened criminals, had tasted lathi beatings and was made to use one bowl to both eat and for the toilet.
United States

Submission + - Pulling Petrol Out of Thin Air (greengoldrush.org)

Dannah writes: "Pulling something out of thin air may sound like magic, but a team of scientists at New Mexico's Sandia National Laboratory are closer to atomic surgeons. They are developing a prototype which uses solar energy to recycle carbon dioxide and produce liquid solar fuel."
The Internet

Submission + - Setting up a small ISP? 1

Mike_K writes: I live in a small condo building, and at our recent meeting we discussed the idea of sharing internet between the codos. The only problem is that we would rather not expose those actually providing the service to harassment from RIAA, MPAA, etc. The best idea I can come up with to solve this is to create a small ISP for our building and give everybody a static IP. I know enough about networking to be able to set this up, but I don't know anything about actually setting up an ISP. Can anybody help me with where to start looking? Would this ever be economical? Is there a better way to go? We are located in a big city with Comcast and Verizon being choices for consumer internet, and close to some big schools with lots of bandwidth, if you think that would help.
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Amazon Kindle Hacked to Allow Encrypted Mobi Books (techluver.com)

Tech.Luver writes: "Igor Skochinsky didn't take too long to crack Amazon Kindle's DRM. On his 'Reversing Everything' blog he details the workaround to read encrypted Mobi books on Kindle, which involves two Python scripts. In his words, "Well, I've discovered the algorithm used to generate the PID and was able to use it on Fictionwise, but there was another catch. AZW files have a flag set in the DRM info which is not present in books bought from other vendors. After fixing that, I could read the book on Kindle." ( http://techluver.com/2007/12/13/amazon-kindle-hacked-to-allow-encrypted-mobi-books/ )"

Submission + - Western Digitial to cripple sharing media content.

/.Rooster writes: Over at the BBC they discuss plans by Western Digital to prevent the sharing of media files as stored on their network drives regardless of whether the content is original and not copy-protected or not. Is this the future of NAS in a world paranoid about DRM and piracy? How does this help the genuine content producers who want to share their work, and more specifically how does this affect my MythTV setup. I don't envisage it will go down terribly well in the open source community but then just how long will it take to cirumvent the measure and should we all just boycott WD drives from now on?

Journal Journal: PDF now ISO 32000

It is official. As Jim King himself blogged today, Adobe has received word that the Ballot for approval of PDF 1.7 to become the ISO 32000 Standard (DIS) has passed by a vote of 13 yes votes and only 1 negative. The report breaks down as follows:

1000 pains = 1 Megahertz