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Comment: What could possibly go wrong? (Score 2, Insightful) 160

by nukenerd (#49330401) Attached to: Energy Company Trials Computer Servers To Heat Homes
I don't know where to begin with what's wrong with this idea.

What is it they say about computer security? I remember - no system can be defended if the hacker has physical access. Real data centres have high security : guards, locked doors, and even inside the building the servers are within their own locked cages. Let me know me what hosting companies are proposing to house their servers in Joe Sixpack's basement, and I'll avoid.

Comment: Re:Gulf of Mexico ? (Score 1) 74

by nukenerd (#49327357) Attached to: World's Largest Asteroid Impacts Found In Central Australia

I'm not sure where you got that one [that the Gulf of Mexico is an impact crater]. The only credible theory related to it is the Chicxulub crater, which is on the Southern edge of the Gulf ........... What theories are you talking about?

I had heard of it, not sure how. This is Wikipedia (under Gulf of Mexico):-

In 2002 geologist Michael Stanton published a speculative essay suggesting an impact origin for the Gulf of Mexico at the close of the Permian, ...... However, Gulf Coast geologists do not regard this hypothesis as having any credibility. Instead they overwhelmingly accept plate tectonics...... This hypothesis is not to be confused with the Chicxulub Crater

I did not say I supported the theory, only that it was suggested. I am not a geologist. Clearly it is now out of favour.

Comment: Re:Airplane vs Satellite (Score 2) 103

by nukenerd (#49322805) Attached to: Finland To Fly "Open Skies" Surveillance Flight Over Russia

What is it specific that can be seen from aircraft, nut not satellite. I.......... Or something else I'm missing?

It is probably as much to do with excercising a right. Like I have a second right of way from my property which I never need to use, but I do use it at least once per year just to maintain that right.

Comment: Re:sOrRy ChArLiE WrOnG tUnA (Score 4, Insightful) 143

by nukenerd (#49307989) Attached to: Excess Time Indoors May Explain Rising Myopia Rates

You're still focusing on the mirror in both cases.

No. If you are looking at objects seen in the mirror you are focussing at the total distance of : you-mirror plus mirror-object
The mirror wraps the distance but does not reduce how far the light must travel or the object appears.

At last : all those hours I spent in school physics drawing light ray diagrams has come in useful.

Comment: Re:I can't wait for the Linus Torvalds rant over t (Score 1) 362

by nukenerd (#49307755) Attached to: OEMs Allowed To Lock Secure Boot In Windows 10 Computers

What Microsoft want is to prevent someone with such a system from trying out Linux, perhaps with a live CD, and liking it.

Oh yeah, sure. Because of the MASSIVE increase in Desktop Linux market share?

Where and how did "MASSIVE increase in Desktop Linux market share" come in to this? I never said anything about it, and never forsee such a thing happening either. WTF has it got to do with this topic?

More to the point, Microsoft are fanatical about trying to stop even a handful of people from using anything but Windows. Microsoft rate them as criminals, and are like some fat Roman emperor hearing that some people at the edge of the World are not sacrificing half their cattle and virgins twice a day in homage to him, and sending a legion there to exterminate them. Every user is "important" to Microsoft, no matter how few.

Comment: Re:I can't wait for the Linus Torvalds rant over t (Score 1) 362

by nukenerd (#49305989) Attached to: OEMs Allowed To Lock Secure Boot In Windows 10 Computers

What's in it for the OEM to do this? Why would they purposefully lock their customers out of a choice of OSes?

Rightly or wronly, perhaps they fear that their help lines will be tied up with people who have installed Linux (or are trying to) asking for help. Perhaps this happens - I do not know, but can imagine it can in some cases.

Now they will be able to say : "It can't be done, end of story, have a nice day." [Click]

Comment: Re:I can't wait for the Linus Torvalds rant over t (Score 1) 362

by nukenerd (#49305953) Attached to: OEMs Allowed To Lock Secure Boot In Windows 10 Computers

Make no mistake. This is a literal and direct attack on Linux.

This isn't about Linux. People who buy a pre-built system from one of the big OEMs have no intention of installing an alternative OS, so this is a non-issue for them.

We nearly all started with a pre-built system. What Microsoft want is to prevent someone with such a system from trying out Linux, perhaps with a live CD, and liking it.

I started with a pre-built (did not have the knowledge back then to try anything else) pe-loaded with Windows, but have built my own ever since running Linux. Microsoft wont stop me now or ever, I am a lost cause to them; but they'd love to stop others following my path. That is what this is about.

How can you work when the system's so crowded?

Working...