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Cellphones

Porting Lemmings In 36 Hours 154

Posted by Soulskill
from the first-in-line dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Aaron Ardiri challenged himself to port his classic PalmOS version of Lemmings to the iPhone, Palm Pre, Mac, and Windows. The porting was done using his own dev environment, which creates native C versions of the game. He liveblogged the whole thing, and finished after only 36 hours with an iPhone version and a Palm Pre version awaiting submission, and free versions for Windows and Mac available on his site."

Comment: Scum! (Score 1) 965

by nudeatom (#18575163) Attached to: Best battle cry
Carlin: Where's ya tool?
  Baldy: What fuckin' tool?
  Carlin: This fuckin' tool!
  [Carlin slips bar out of his sleeve and hits Baldy with it]

Carlin: Right Banks, you bastard! I'm the daddy now, next time, I'll fucking kill ya!
Operating Systems

+ - Is Gentoo in crisis?

Submitted by
TheCoop1984
TheCoop1984 writes "A recent article on distrowatch, and an extended thread on the gentoo forums, have pointed out that gentoo is not what it used to be. Daniel Robbins came back and went again after only a few days, developer turnover is as high as ever, personal attacks on the mailing lists are common, and people are generally not happy about the current state of affairs. Is gentoo rotting from the inside, and can anything be done about it?"
Linux Business

+ - French government choose Ubuntu Linux for National

Submitted by uberspider
uberspider (1074583) writes "It's been talked about for some time, but finally the French government has finally chosen the standard operating system and applications for its National Assembly, of course its Linux not Microsoft. But more suprisingly the French didn't choose the local distro Mandriva, but instead it chose the seemingly unstoppable Ubuntu distro, according to this ZDnet article (in French) here.

The news was also picked up by Investment and Business News

"Whilst France is currently in the throws of a vicious election campaign, it seems that quietly in the background another victory has taken place. The victory isn't just for freedom, it seems that the victory is for free software."

The article goes on to indicate momentum for Linux on the desktop in France after the Peugeot deal as well

"That Linux is accelerating rapidly in the server market is not in doubt, that it is now starting to make headway on the desktop should be a strong indicator of things to come.""
Microsoft

+ - EU claim MS still not compliant

Submitted by Zo0ok
Zo0ok (209803) writes "EU is still not impressed with the way Microsoft complies with the March 2004 decision. Microsoft is given four weeks to respond and can look forward to more penalties if they fail to comply. EU FAQ available."
Censorship

+ - Dell censors IdeaStorm Linux dissent

Submitted by thefickler
thefickler (1030556) writes "It seems pointless seeking ideas and feedback if you 're going to ignore and delete the ones you don't like. That's exactly what Dell is doing with its IdeaStorm web site, which has been set up by the company to solicit ideas and feedback. It deleted a post that linked to an article that criticized its handling of the "preinstalled Linux" issue."
Software

+ - Wil Wheaton reviews Linux audio players

Submitted by ForeverFaithless
ForeverFaithless (894809) writes "Wil Wheaton has reviewed several popular audio players on Linux, including XMMS, Amarok, and Banshee. Wil comes to the conclusion that Amarok is his favorite of the bunch, stating "I have never loved a music player as much as I love Amarok, and I've never had as much fun flipping through my library and learning more about my favorite artists.""
Announcements

+ - Australia Outlaws Incandescent Lightbulb

Submitted by
passthecrackpipe
passthecrackpipe writes "The Australian Government is planning on making the incandescent ligtbulb a thing of the past. In three years time, standard lightbulbs will no longer be available for sale in the shops in Australia (expect a roaring grey market) and everybody will be forced to switch to more energy efficient Fluorescent bulbs. In this move to try and curb emissions, the incandescent bulb — which converts the majority of used energy to heat rather then light — will be phased out. Environmental groups have given this plan a lukewarm reception. They feel Australia should sign on to the Kyoto protocol first. (Article in Dutch). A similar plan was created together with Phillips, one of the worlds largest lighting manufacturers. What do other slashdotters think? Is this a move in the right direction? Will this boost the development of better fluorescent bulbs? Improve the design and lower the costs of LED lightbulbs? Will this plan make a big difference to the environment at all?"
Communications

+ - UK taps 439,000 phones and emails; wants 645 more

Submitted by JPMH
JPMH (100614) writes "With the largest density of CCTV cameras in the world, and an increasing network of automatic number-plate recognition cameras on main roads, Britain has long been a pioneer for the surveillance society. Now new official figures reveal that UK agencies monitored 439,000 telephones and email addresses in a 15 month period between 2005 and 2006. The Interception of Communications Commissioner is seeking the right for agencies to be allowed to monitor the communications of Members of Parliament as well, something which has been forbidden since the 1960s. It must be that it is bringing their numbers down: on the law of averages they should be monitoring at least 5 of the MPs."
Privacy

UK's Blair Dismisses Online Anti ID-Card Petition 377

Posted by kdawson
from the no-is-an-answer-too dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Prime Minister Tony Blair has responded personally via email to 28,000 online petitioners opposing the UK's planned identity card scheme, and has closed the online petition. The email reads: 'We live in a world in which people, money and information are more mobile than ever before. Terrorists and international criminal gangs increasingly exploit this to move undetected across borders and to disappear within countries. Terrorists routinely use multiple identities — up to 50 at a time... ID cards which contain biometric recognition details and which are linked to a National Identity Register will make this much more difficult.'"

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. -- H. L. Mencken

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