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+ - Which sociological factors influence FOSS licensing decisions?->

Submitted by ectoman
ectoman (594315) writes "Can sociology shed some light on developers' decisions to adopt more permissive open source licenses? Dr. Nicolas Suzor, Research Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, summarizes two studies that seem to say so. Suzor writes that "the choice of license appears likely to be substantially determined by social norms" and programmers' sense of "social obligation" or "duty towards society." The studies also note that "intrinsic motivations (beliefs about redistribution rights or social benefits of FLOSS) have a stronger effect on license choice than extrinsic motivations (expection of reputation or economic gain). Suzor's review contains other interesting tidbits, too. For example: "Less experienced managers of free software projects, in particular, are strongly susceptible to influence from others, and the licenses chosen by similar projects has a strong influence on license choice.""
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Google

+ - Jury Rules Google Violated Java Copyright, Google Moves for Mistrial-> 1

Submitted by eldavojohn
eldavojohn (898314) writes "Details are thin but the long covered Oracle Vs Google trial has at least partially been decided in favor of Oracle against Google violating copyrights in Android when when it used Java APIs to design the system. Google moved for a mistrial after hearing the incomplete decision. The patent infringement accusations have yet to be ruled upon."
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Earth

+ - Philips releases 100W-equivalent LED bulb, runs on just 23 watts-> 1

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "The Light Fair convention kicks off in Las Vegas this week so there will be any number of related announcements coming soon. Lighting giant Philips is starting things off early with the announcement of their 100W-equivalent LED bulb, the AmbientLED 23W. The model produces 1700 lumens, putting it at a very respectable 73.9 lm/W. The unveiling comes shortly after Philips’ L Prize bulb was made available to consumers. That bulb currently sells for about $60 and is a more efficient light source, capable of 94 lm/W. The two use similar designs, for example both take advantage of remote phosphor, but the AmbientLED 23W (it will be called the EnduraLED in non-consumer applications) is brighter and lacking in some of the performance characteristics of the L Prize winner, including luminous efficiency and color accuracy. Philips’ 100W-equivalent bulb will be available some time in the fourth quarter. Pricing has yet to be announced, but it will likely be well over $30."
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Ubuntu

+ - Canonical releases Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Precise Pangolin->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "No one can accuse Canonical of sitting around during the first quarter of 2012. With no less than six different release announcements since January, it seems that everything that Mark Shuttleworth’s company has been working on for the past few years is crystallizing all at once. With the release of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS today, Canonical is looking to end the quarter on a high note by providing a stable release that is aimed directly at enterprise deployments. Precise Pangolin doesn’t offer any new functionality that fans of the Ubuntu platform haven’t already seen — but it will be the first time that enterprise users get to use the controversial Unity UI..."
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+ - international shipping->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "MarinersPlanet.com targets the possible development of new generation seafarer’s society online thus providing the great online networking occasion for seafarers, Recruiters and the perfect place for companies to advertise their products."
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Hardware

+ - DisplayPort standard no longer open->

Submitted by ShoulderOfOrion
ShoulderOfOrion (646118) writes "Open-standards advocates have heralded and championed DisplayPort as an open standard available free of charge and free from royalties. Now that DisplayPort is beginning to appear on more PCs, graphics cards and monitors, this situation quietly changed last year with no one taking notice. Has another 'open' PC standard fallen victim to corporate interests?"
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Power

+ - HP's New ARM Servers: It's All About Power->

Submitted by
snydeq
snydeq writes "HP's decision to go with ARM for its new Redstone server "platform" is a blow to Intel, but the real story is that AC power now costs more than hardware, InfoWorld reports. 'HP's new high-concept initiative, Project Moonshot, under which the Redstone project was launched ... is actually a pretty bold plan: Push the data center toward extreme low-power servers and "hyperscale" architecture (another way of referring to a large private cloud). As a proof of concept, you're supposed to be able to squeeze more than 2,800 Redstone servers in a single rack. According to HP Labs, this configuration yields 89 percent less energy, 94 percent less space, and an overall cost reduction of up to 63 percent compared to traditional server systems.'"
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Data Storage

+ - Will the Thailand floods drown the hard drive?-> 1

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "There's fresh news on the imminent hard drive shortages the IT industry is facing, and it isn't particularly good. Asus's CFO, David Chang, has warned that the company's supplies of HDDs will run out by the end of November. "Substitutes for HDD are very few, so if the situation persists, not only notebook production will be affected but also desktops, and other component shipments will also drop," Chang told Reuters. Retail prices on HDDs are already skyrocketing. The 1TB Samsung Spinpoint F3's price has risen to $79 at Newegg, up from $69 not two weeks ago. It's now the only 1TB drive south of a Benjamin. WD's Caviar Green series is now up to $109 with high performance drives like the Caviar Black all the way back to $169 for a 1TB model. At what price point will buyers start considering SSDs instead of HDDs? Will buyers perhaps buy a small SSD now, and then a larger HDD once prices drop again? Will hard drive prices drop again? Maybe this is exactly the kick SSDs need to finally overtake their plattered brethren."
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Power

+ - Apple Plans Solar Array to Support iDataCenter->

Submitted by 1sockchuck
1sockchuck (826398) writes "Apple is installing an array of solar panels near its huge data center in North Carolina. Apple joins a growing number of data center operators building on-site solar arrays to offset some of their use of utility power. Until now, solar power hasn’t been widely used in data centers because it takes a very large installation of photovoltaic solar panels to produce even a fraction of the energy required by most data centers. That's starting to change, as shown by a New Jersey project that will generate 14 megawatts of power."
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+ - The telephone celebrates its 150th birthday->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "When Johann Philipp Reis used his telephone to transmit the phrase "the horse does not eat cucumber salad" 150 years ago, the German scientist could never have guessed this sentence was about to revolutionise communications. Reis presented his invention in a lecture titled, "Concerning the reproduction of sounds over any distance by means of galvanic electricity," to the Physical Society of Frankfurt on October 26, 1861. The 27-year-old chose the unusual phrase about horses and cucumbers so that a listener could not guess the meaning of the sentence without hearing every single word."
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Wireless Networking

+ - Harness electromagnetic wave for energy-> 2

Submitted by zorazora
zorazora (2421200) writes "A team of researchers at Georgia Tech has found a way to harness electromagnetic wave for energy.
"Tentzeris and his team of researchers, including IEEE members Rushi Vyas and Vasileios Lakafosis, have created a self-powered sensor that relies on an ultrawideband antenna to capture energy from the 100 megahertz and greater frequencies generated by all those systems. The scavenged energy is converted from AC to DC, and then stored in a capacitor that gradually fills until the sensor is fully charged. The team has used the antenna to power a number of sensors, including sensors that detect heat and humidity, as well as biosensors that monitor physiological changes in humans. And Tentzeris says that as the technology advances, it has the potential to charge other devices.""

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