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+ - OpenShot Video Editor Achieves $35k on Kickstarter, Final Goal in Reach!-> 5

Submitted by JonOomph
JonOomph (1922630) writes "The popular open source video editor, OpenShot, has less than 39 hours remaining on popular crowd-funding site, Kickstarter.com. The lead developer, Jonathan Thomas, has proposed a revolutionary new feature, which would allow users to offload CPU, memory, and disk cache to a local server (or multiple local servers), dramatically increasing the speed of previewing and rendering. The more servers added to the pool, the faster the video editing engine becomes (with the primary limitation being network bandwidth). If the final goal of $40k is reached in the remaining hours, this feature will be added to the next version of OpenShot."
Link to Original Source
Google

Google Docs Vs. Microsoft Word: an Even Matchup? 346

Posted by samzenpus
from the duke-it-out dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes "Software developer Jeff Cogswell writes: 'About a year ago, I decided to migrate my documents to Google Docs and start using it for all my professional writing. I quickly hit some problems; frankly, Google Docs wasn't as good an option as I'd initially hoped. Now I use LibreOffice on my desktop, and it works well, but I had to go through long odysseys with Google Docs and Zoho Docs to reach this point. Is Microsoft Word actually better than Google Docs and Zoho Docs? For my work, the answer is "yes," but this doesn't make me particularly happy. In the following essay, I present my problems with Google Docs and Zoho Docs (as well as some possible solutions) from my perspective as both a professional writer and a software developer.'"

Comment: Re:Because they make money from it? (Score 1) 80

by nostrad (#36616388) Attached to: How Long Will Oracle Stick With Open Source?

VirtualBox OSE has (Tight)VNC support if you run it through VBoxHeadless. I personally run it to virtualize an older windows installation tucked away on a cheap-o computer which does not do VM-extensions and it works well.

Unless you need USB2 or PXE-boot (or RDP to your virtualized display for some reason), the open source edition is really neat.

Open Source

Skype Is Working To Defeat the Reverse Engineering 169

Posted by Soulskill
from the good-luck-with-your-time-machine dept.
ndogg writes "Michael Larabel of Phoronix was emailed a response to the reverse engineering of the Skype protocol from the VP of Skype's PR company, who said that the reverse engineering was done for the use of spam/phishing, and that it's an infringement of their IP, and that they are working to defeat it."

Comment: Re:Not just for games (Score 2) 83

by nostrad (#35417720) Attached to: Gameduino Project Aims To Game-ify the Arduino

It's an FPGA on there with verilog code available. Go grab the Xilinx WebPack (free, windows/linux), get a JTAG cable (I've seen Xilinx USB-clones for less than $50 on eBay) and get cracking.

Getting to know the tools is hard, learning to think in VHDL/Verilog is hard (at least if you're not used to thinking in terms of logic gates and other hardware) but you can transform that board into pretty much any hardware you'd like and control it from the arduino. The reason for the 400x300 is probably memory limitations on the Spartan chip, some clever design/coding to optimise memory to your application should help with that.

Comment: Re:Linux (Score 2, Interesting) 105

by BadAnalogyGuy (#29745483) Attached to: Acer Launching Dual Android/Windows 7 Netbook

If you're going to propose that Moblin is somehow better than Android for non-phone devices, it would be nice to have some backup information to prove your point.

The fact of the matter is that Linux is not designed to be an embedded OS, and the efforts that Moblin and Linux are making are significant but not wholly complete. When, as you say, the OS boots faster, is transparent, and exists invisibly to users (though clearly to developers), then we will have a true "mobile Linux" distribution.

Acer seems to be tempting fate here and begging Microsoft to raise their licensing costs. If they pass their costs onto consumers, will their cheap hardware keep prices low enough to attract customers, even with the higher-priced desktop OS? I don't know, but it seems very dangerous for them to be making such claims at this point.

Comment: Re:What about the banks? (Score 1) 422

by nostrad (#29742519) Attached to: Washington Post Says Use Linux To Avoid Bank Fraud

Won't work, because first you need to authorize the account number being added, and the challenge to adding that is by inputting the account number into your token. Thus the criminal can't transfer funds into his account.
The second part is a challenge with the amount you want to transfer. Again, making it hard to fiddle, although since there are limited amount of digits on the token you can fiddle a bit with the amount, however you still can't get it to your account unless that account# has been pre-authorized to receive transactions.

Comment: Re:How do they do it? (Score 1) 145

by nostrad (#26213867) Attached to: Repair Crews Reach Vicinity of Damaged Cables In Mediterranean
You can, that's the good part about it, many times signals reflect when they hit an improperly terminated connection (impendance mismatch). This holds for both optical and electrical signals. Given the propagation time and speed, length is trivially calculated. There's special hardware to do this for you. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impedance_mismatch
Earth

Space Is Just a Little Bit Closer Than Expected 130

Posted by timothy
from the winter-shrinkage dept.
SpuriousLogic points out a BBC story which begins "The upper reaches of Earth's atmosphere are much lower than expected, a US Air Force satellite has found. Currently, the ionosphere — a layer of charged particles that envelopes the planet — is at an altitude of about 420km, some 200km lower than expected. The behaviour of the ionosphere is important because disturbances in its structure can upset satellite communications and radar."
Math

Major Advances In Knot Theory 230

Posted by kdawson
from the if-it's-not-theory-then-it-must-be-practice dept.
An anonymous reader sends us to Science News, which is running a survey of recent strides in finding an answer to the age-old question: How many ways are there to tie your shoelaces? "Mathematicians have been puzzling over that question for a century or two, and the main thing they've discovered is that the question is really, really hard. In the last decade, though, they've developed some powerful new tools inspired by physics that have pried a few answers from the universe's clutches. Even more exciting is that the new tools seem to be the tip of a much larger theory that mathematicians are just beginning to uncover. That larger mathematical theory, if it exists, may help crack some of the hardest mathematical questions there are, questions about the mathematical structure of the three- and four-dimensional space where we live. ... Revealing the full ... superstructure may be the work of a generation."
The Internet

Opera Develops Search Engine For Web Developers 31

Posted by Soulskill
from the web-devs-need-love-too dept.
nk497 writes "The Metadata Analysis and Mining Application (MAMA) doesn't index content like a standard search engine, but looks at markup, style, scripting and the technology behind pages. Based on those existing MAMA-ed pages, 80.4 per cent of sites use cascading style sheets (CSS), while the average web page has 47 markup errors and 16,400 characters. Should you want to know which country is using the AJAX component XMLHttpRequest the most, MAMA can tell you that it's Norway, with 10.2 per cent of the data set." Additional coverage is available at Computerworld, and a deeper explanation is up at Opera's Dev site.
Bug

e1000e Bug Squashed — Linux Kernel Patch Released 111

Posted by Soulskill
from the good-news-everyone dept.
ruphus13 writes "As mentioned earlier, there was a kernel bug in the alpha/beta version of the Linux kernel (up to 2.6.27 rc7), which was corrupting (and rendering useless) the EEPROM/NVM of adapters. Thankfully, a patch is now out that prevents writing to the EEPROM once the driver is loaded, and this follows a patch released by Intel earlier in the week. From the article: 'The Intel team is currently working on narrowing down the details of how and why these chipsets were affected. They also plan on releasing patches shortly to restore the EEPROM on any adapters that have been affected, via saved images using ethtool -e or from identical systems.' This is good news as we move towards a production release!"

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