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Comment: Re:Some would be well suited. (Score 3, Informative) 299

by nolife (#48076913) Attached to: Why Military Personnel Make the Best IT Pros

From my experience, the "military" or command mentality is this:
Follow my orders, questioning things is a sign of subordination, obey my guidance because I am right, just do it, and you don't have enough info to make your own decisions.

We have all worked for those people.

The one thing I have found without a doubt from every person I have met that has some or all of those characteristics is a person that is not truly comfortable with what they are doing. They are afraid of people digging in deeper into the why and how because they themselves do not know or did not think or care to ask. They do not want to be questioned because it may expose their own weaknesses. It is a mechanism they use to deflect the questions and reasons hoping you will just accept them. I've seen this from both ex military non military people with no more of one than the other. I've also found that if the person really does not know what they are doing or in over their head but is playing the part, they will EVENTUALLY be exposed at some point. It's usually not long for once a few people on both sides of that supervisor or person start really digging until they are gone.

Comment: Re:Doesn't scale well (Score 1) 175

by nolife (#48016631) Attached to: When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

Why do clothes dryers and fireplaces not have a second inlet duct pulling outside air directly into the unit so you are not sucking air from the living space which is then replaced from outside air through cracks and crevices and pulled through your house somewhat defeating the purpose? I could kind of see it with a fireplace that is open because it would be difficult to get a good draw but there is no reason to not have that functionality on a clothes dryer. Maybe with the clothes dryer, it would take more heat to heat up freezing cold air from outside but at least that air is "dry" and will aid in removing moisture once heated a bit. Am I missing something?

Comment: Re:Hmmm .... (Score 1) 112

by nolife (#47929613) Attached to: A DC-10 Passenger Plane Is Perfect At Fighting Wildfires

The chain of events was
1. A cargo door not latched and dogged shut even though it appeared to be shut and its indicator indicated shut and latched.
2. Door blows off at some altitude and pressure vents off, passenger area vents slower from lack of enough vents and air pressure collapses the floor.
3. As floor is collapsing and falling into the cargo area, it breaks major hydraulic lines that are run just under the floor.
4. Pilot no has little to no control of the plane and.....

Comment: Re:I'm shocked! (Score 1) 181

by nolife (#47711683) Attached to: Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

The costs of laying wire/fiber are expensive but in the end, the people in the area can and do eventually pay for it regardless of who did it. It doesn't matter if Verizon, Comcast, Joe's Fiber Company, or the city of Whatever did the laying of the wire, the final cost for that wiring project would be the same. The problem with the franchise agreements is the people paid but they paid it to a single company that won't share it. People could have paid a third party or the local government the same amount of money in the end to run those lines and had an "open" line and then picked a carrier for their service on that line. The Verizons and Comcasts could still negotiate and run their own lines in the same area instead of providing service on the existing "public" lines but they won't. Why? Because of the competition and choice people have and they do not see money in doing it.

Comment: Re:In other words... (Score 4, Insightful) 268

Devolving talent and skills requires time. There is always new people coming in but they do not come in immediately to the higher level positions. They start lower and possibly work their way up. If your top performers are leaving soon after they reach that "top performer" level, you will have less top performers. So, you recognize their benefit to your company and provide better benefits to try to keep keep them happy or you illegally collude with your competition and peers to not offer benefits greater then you or flat out refuse to hire them away from each other at any cost. These companies chose the later method.

Comment: Re:How Can The USMS Sell These? (Score 1) 88

by nolife (#47360623) Attached to: Winners of First Seized Silk Road Bitcoin Auction Remain Anonymous

They could belong to anyone. All that person(s) has to do if file a claim and prove ownership.

Obviously no one including Ulbright himself attempted to claim them. Therefore, no claim of ownership so it goes to auction. There is a risk involved with claiming property that was involved with illegal activity. At no point were the owners of these bitcoins ever held back or hindered from officially claiming them. If you were doing nothing illegal, there is very little reason not to claim ownership.

This is standard procedure and has been this way for decades. No different then the local police confiscating stolen car stereos and iPads. If no one claims them, they are auctioned off.

Comment: Re:Speculation... (Score 1) 455

by nolife (#47274563) Attached to: NADA Is Terrified of Tesla

Wait until you get a car from a local person that turns out to not have a good title- or was in an accident and reconditioned. Talk about stress.

You look at the title before you buy it. If you bought a car with no title or a recon, that was your own fault, anyone can EASILY avoid that situation with a 5 second look at the title. Unless the person forged the title but that is another issue.

Make headway at work. Continue to let things deteriorate at home.

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